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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited by Moderator)
Hi, I am looking for a good four leg family member. I have searched and found some of the top breeds. But I am little confuse as I don't have any experience of a dog. Please let me know which breeds will be perfect for my family? Which of these dogs have the good reputation as a family dog? Please let me know your thoughts.
 

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I have removed the link to the blog, as driving traffic away from this forum is not permitted under our rules.

If you are looking for a dog, and not just promoting another site, why not tell us a bit more about what you are looking for in terms of size, exercise needs, grooming needs and trainability so we can try to help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Oh!! Thanks for your interest. I just need a small size dog breed, which is easy to groom and don't take much time of me.
 

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Oh!! Thanks for your interest. I just need a small size dog breed, which is easy to groom and don't take much time of me.
what would you class as a small size dog? 3kg? 6kg? 12kg? different people call different things small. How much time can you spend with the dog? low shedding or do you not mind? There is a lot more we would need to know to help you find a breed
 

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A few things:
  • There is no breed that will always turn up perfect for families, so that term is very generic. For example, a Lab or a Beagle could become one of the worst family dogs that you could ever have, or a Chihuahua or a Yorkie could be one of the best. My suggestion is to get a rescue dog that is old enough for you to know if it's a good family dog.
  • All dogs take a certain amount of time, although an adult would take less time than a puppy. So, if you want a dog that won't take as much time as others, get an adult. Puppies take a tremendous amount of time, so do not get one if that's what you are looking for. But no dog will take a tiny amount of time. None.
  • @berryncherry, I'm pretty sure all the breeds you suggested require quite a bit of grooming, with maybe the exception of the Havanese. But correct me if I'm wrong.
All in all, I think that you should look for an adult dog at a rescue or shelter, because then you know if they are a good family dog, what size they'll be when they grow up (since they are already grown up), and they won't take as much time as a puppy. You could also get one that is already trained, for even less time needed.
Hopefully this was helpful!
 

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Maltese, Havenese, and Bichon Frise are all relatively small dog breeds that don't shed much you can consider.:)
However, they need to be groomed regularly and you have to pay a professional to do that, so they are not "easy to groom" I do my own grooming of a fluffy dog, and believe me it is not what I would call "easy".
 

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Oh!! Thanks for your interest. I just need a small size dog breed, which is easy to groom and don't take much time of me.
It would help us if we had more information. For example;

How much time can you commit per day to exercise, training, grooming, playing, etc?
What's your environment like - example, urban/rural/suburban, size of the house and garden? Is the garden secure?
How long will the dog be left alone per day/week?
Any deal breakers - things you absolutely cannot tolerate in a dog?
Any children or other pets? (This will be your first dog I believe, but what about other pets - cats, birds, fish, rodents, reptiles? Etc). How young are the kids?


A few things:
  • There is no breed that will always turn up perfect for families, so that term is very generic. For example, a Lab or a Beagle could become one of the worst family dogs that you could ever have, or a Chihuahua or a Yorkie could be one of the best. My suggestion is to get a rescue dog that is old enough for you to know if it's a good family dog.
  • All dogs take a certain amount of time, although an adult would take less time than a puppy. So, if you want a dog that won't take as much time as others, get an adult. Puppies take a tremendous amount of time, so do not get one if that's what you are looking for. But no dog will take a tiny amount of time. None.
  • @berryncherry, I'm pretty sure all the breeds you suggested require quite a bit of grooming, with maybe the exception of the Havanese. But correct me if I'm wrong.
All in all, I think that you should look for an adult dog at a rescue or shelter, because then you know if they are a good family dog, what size they'll be when they grow up (since they are already grown up), and they won't take as much time as a puppy. You could also get one that is already trained, for even less time needed.
Hopefully this was helpful!
The reason the tiny breeds such as Chihuahuas are not good family dogs is because their bones are so fragile that they can easily break (happened to my own in her previous house) and fragile dogs and boisterous, possibly clumsy kids don't mix.

That and the fact that Chis are known to have feisty (ie horrid) temperments and young kids have a tendency to treat them like dolls. (Again, talking from experience).

I would recommend a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. They tend to be good family dogs, fairly small, not much grooming, handler focussed, robust enough that any young kids aren't going to break them.

Breed traits do count. There's a reason you don't use a greyhound to flush out game, or trust a spaniel to chase a motorised rabbit around a race track, and it's an unwise owner who expects a Patterdale Terrier to be a lapdog. ;)

However, dogs are individuals, just like us, so even within the breed it's possible to get a dog who acts differently - a low energy patterdale, for example (unlikely, but theoretically possible).

Rescue centres don't necessarily know which dogs are great for families either. The best dog to go for would be a dog that is, or has been, fostered, and therefore assessed in the family environment.

However, I do agree that puppies are absolutely not what you're looking for, unless you're prepared to put the work in .
 

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Oh!! Thanks for your interest. I just need a small size dog breed, which is easy to groom and don't take much time of me.
different people mean different things if they say "doesn't take much time". So, how much time do you want to spend every day taking acre of, and exercising, playing with and training your dog?

All dogs need time and attention and energy. Even if you get an adult dog, it will need to be trained to your specific home; it will not come already trained to be your perfect dog. An adult dog may take every bit as much time as a puppy to train even if you do not have to house train the dog, because where the dog lived previously probably had different rules from what you have in your home.
Maybe the adult dog was allowed on furniture, and you don't want that. Maybe it doesn't understand small children or cats, and you have those. And so on.

If you want a dog who doesn't take much of your time, may I respectfully ask why you want a dog at all?

they all take time.....and usually when someone wants a dog it is because they want to have a dog with whom to spend their time.
 

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I would recommend a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. They tend to be good family dogs, fairly small, not much grooming, handler focussed, robust enough that any young kids aren't going to break them.
All true about Staffordshires, and they are really great family dogs. But they are also very energetic and need a lot of exercise.....so, I would ask Ivanbey, if a dog like that appeals to you, how much time are you willing to spend daily on exercising the dog more than just a quick walk around the block...?

(again, for one person "don't take much time" means a half hour a few days out of the week, and for another it means not more than four hours a day....so hard to tell without more details.)
 

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Maybe just look for regular Poms? Teacup breeds are 'trending' meaning that it is very hard to find a place to get them that isn't a puppy mill or a BYB.
 

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I second (or third) the warning about getting a "teacup" anything. Dogs bred for tiny size are almost always bred by back yard breeders and puppy mills, because since it is not recognized as an actual size for the breed they are not bred by the good breeders, who are choosing their breeding pairs based on health checks and conformation.

Regular pomeranians are pretty small already.
Dogs bred down to "teacup" size very often have serious and/or multiple health issues because they have only been chosen to breed for their tiny size and other faults in the breeding dog's makeup are over looked. Often when you buy a badly bred dog you will end up with a lot of vet bills.
 

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Yeah... Maybe just look for a regular Pom? Even better, look for them in shelters and rescues!
 

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I get the feeling that you got your dog from a puppy mill… Responsible breeders usually have long wait lists and rescues and shelters take some time to discover who is the best match for who.
 
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