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Hi. I previously had a cat, Ares. We think she was Russian blue mix. We got her in 2000 before we had kids. Then when my son was about 5 we had him tested and found out he was allergic to cats and around that time my husband also found out he was allergic. We kept our cat and were just meticulous on cleaning our house, got rid of carpet and kept her out of our bedrooms. She was a low allergen cat because whenever my son when to another person's house with cats he was horrible. Sadly, Ares passed away in April at almost 16. I miss her terribly and want to get another cat. But in order to do that I need to get a hypoallergenic one so my husband and kid doesn't suffer. Any suggestions on a good breed to get? I don't want a hairless one. Thank you!
 

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It's not really the overall cat that people are allergic to. It could be the fur, the dander, or proteins in their saliva etc that's causing the flare ups.

Siamese breeds - like your russian blue - tend to be fairly safe. I love siamese anything personally, personality all their own. Probably best to find someone that has a breed and have your family be around it.

Used to have a pure blue point, nothing quite like the siamese caterwaul.
 

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Good idea on finding someone that owns a certain breed to see my family's reaction. Thanks!
 

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My husband is an allergist and says his major pet-peeve is the claim of "hypoallergenic" cats and dogs. There is no such thing. The Siberian breed of cat claims to be hypoallergenic, if you want to research that breed. My friend who is VERY allergic to cats got one, and though she still reacts to him, it is far less than "regular" cats. She does not allow him in her bedroom, has an air purifier with HEPA filter in every room, takes a zyrtec daily, etc. What I would suggest is finding a breeder and then visiting to see how you react. You'll know within 20 minutes. My husband recommends that to all his patients when they are considering a hypoallergenic breed of cat or dog.
 

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I suggest another round of allergy testing, as allergies are not static and can progress to more serious symptoms. If there is progression, as has been pointed out it can be the saliva and dander that can trigger an allergic reaction, meaning that even the most meticulous housekeeping will not help.
 

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the primary trigger for allergies to cats is the microdebris of saliva flakes...

... which is so light & fine, it FLOATS everywhere, & can be found on ceilings & walls, as well as inside the heating / cooling vents, between the fibers of upholstery, -inside- pillows beneath the fabric covering, etc, etc.

"cleaning" cannot possibly eliminate it all - cats deposit a thin wrapper of saliva on every hair as they dutifully groom, combing with their tongues, & the saliva when dry shatters & flakes off.
And then it travels - on every faint air-current, when a door is opened, when someone walks by, when air pressure changes with barometric change, &
so on.

A cat who causes minimal reactions in a sensitive person is very individualistic -
it can be breed or even the individual cat & what proteins s/he secretes in saliva.

Avoiding upholstered furniture - use washable cushions.
Wrapping the mattress, bedspring & all pillows in MITE PROOF zippered covers.
Putting a well-sealed HEPA filter over the whole-house air return, to remove microdebris before it enters the vents.
Discarding the HEPA filter every 90-days.
Having a well-reputed professional company clean all the vents, without using chemicals - non-toxic cleaners or steam only.
Remove all wall-to-wall or large carpets & use only washable area rugs, or hoseable fibers such as coir, grass mats, & similar.
Tile, hardwood, or other well-sealed, easily cleaned floors.
Keeping the cat OUT of the sufferer's bedroom! - absolutely banned, no kitty.
Close the vents that enter the sufferer's bedroom; cover the louvers with fine closed-cell foam, as filters.
Give them a personal heater for winter such as Dyson fanless, & a window-AC unit for summer, just for their room.
Washing bedding including all blankets, throws, duvets, mattress pads, etc,
regularly.

Those can all help, as can a low-dose antihistamine, but even with those precautions & extras, there is no guarantee that the allergic person will be able to cope with a cat in the house. :(
Good luck.
- terry
 

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Hi, I would also suggest Russian blue in that case. Just to make it clear, I always rather support adopting an abandoned cat (of no particular breed) than buying a cat from a breeder, but this is one of the rare cases when breed actually matters.
Anyway, unlike your husband and son who found out about the allergy once you have already got the cat, my boyfriend and I had the opposite situation. He has always known that he was allergic and getting a cat wasn't an option even though we love them sooo much. However, one evening we found an abandoned small kitten in front of our flat and we couldn't let him spend a night there. It was a domestic cat, no breed, no pedigree :D we decided to take it inside only for a night and to look for a shelter the day after and we hoped that my boyfriend won't have an overwhelming allergic reaction. Surprisingly, he didn't react at all and we decided to keep it for another night and another ... When we went to see a vet, he said that it's probably a Russian blue mix even though you couldn't say that for sure based on her appearance. Anyways, that's how we got our caaat <3 Most of the time, it's all perfect regarding allergies, my boyfriend does feel some symptoms only in rare cases when we skip a cleaning routine (due to other obligations) but as long as we keep our home tidy and clean - no problems. Another important thing is a good air purifier with HEPA filter like MHDDOG2016 said. If you need to learn more about it, here you can find the information on how to find the best air purifier for allergies.
 
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