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We have an older rescue (5/6 years old boxer mix) and our rescue puppy (estimated 10//11 months old, appears to be husky shiba inu mix).

The husky pup is in a large crate and exercise pen in the living room while we are working with a trainer to integrate her into the house.

They play/are in the yard together for 1-4 hours a day weather depending, and have a great time. They have minimum 1 hour walks a day, they seem like happy dogs. The dog training recently meant that she is learning her place as 2nd dog, and she didn't seem to like it. We were told husky's don't always take to this very well at first. We experienced some sulking, laying with her back to us.

The puppy all of a sudden stopped leaping around when I take her food into the pen, and refuses to eat. Then if I go back in the pen and give her some attention she'll eat for a while. This can go on for 4 or 5 times till she has finished.

The obvious link would seem like the training is causing her to go through some sort of emotions, but can anyone throw any light on this?

She has to be shown her place as 2nd dog as the boxer mix is very dominant and has obviously been in the family/house for a lot longer.

Thank you!
Thomas
 

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What does the training involve to ”show her her place”? And how long have you had her?
 

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How long ago did her appetite change? Could she simply be ill?

Hierarchy in a multi-dog household is much more fluid and complex than used to be thought - one may take precedence when it comes to toys, the other to beds - and if one dog does 'take command', that may well involve allowing the other one to take liberties. They usually sort this out between themselves without any need for aggression or coercion - aggression is a high-risk strategy for dogs so they use peaceful means such as body language. Humans meddle with this at their peril.
 

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What does the training involve to ”show her her place”? And how long have you had her?
We've had her for about 3 months. This trainer has been working with us for 1 month.

Showing her her place is when we have her out of her pen, the boxer has privileges such as being allowed on the furniture and the husky isn't.

And when the boxer is on one of the two dog beds, the husky is not allowed to get on there with her. We thought this was "cute" when we first saw it but the boxer eventually put her in her place with a loud bark, so now the husky is now not allowed to try. That is the extent of "showing her her place" not as strict as I made that sentence sound.

She is just being a normal naughty puppy, goes behind the sofa when we're not looking to try and get round to the boxer's bed and things like that.

I know dog training methods vary greatly from person to person, and there are many different views and opinions for each method. But once we implemented these rules (boxer only allowed on sofa, husky not allowed to get on bed with boxer) the boxer seems so much happier in the house, she simply seems to not want the annoying puppy around her all the time in the house! Whereas the back garden is the 'play area' and the boxer tolerates all the puppy play she has to offer.

But this is it, it was the exact day we implemented this latest training method that the husky started sulking. I just wondered if anyone had any experience of this and if and when it passes?

My main aim is to obviously have two happy dogs. I don't like that she seems upset, but going back to before this training seems to make the boxer upset!
 

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How long ago did her appetite change? Could she simply be ill?

Hierarchy in a multi-dog household is much more fluid and complex than used to be thought - one may take precedence when it comes to toys, the other to beds - and if one dog does 'take command', that may well involve allowing the other one to take liberties. They usually sort this out between themselves without any need for aggression or coercion - aggression is a high-risk strategy for dogs so they use peaceful means such as body language. Humans meddle with this at their peril.
That's very interesting thanks Judy.

Her appetite changed the day we implemented this most recent training step (please see my reply to JoanneF on this thread). She doesn't seem to be ill in the slightest in any other way, it seems emotional. (Although we will certainly get her checked if it persists, once our vet is re-open after all this Corona blows over).

It certainly seems complex and fluid having two dogs, especially two rescues with big personalities. They do really seem to enjoy each other when we are in the back garden, on walks, on hikes, it's just in the house in the evenings is the final kinks in the hierarchy to sort out, and hopefully they will both be happy at the end of it?
 

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I completely understand the wish to have them use their own beds, and to give the older one space from the pup but to be honest I think allowing one on the furniture and the other not won't be seen as ”privileges” - it will more likely just be a bit confusing.

How have you been told to go about asking her to stay off the furniture/ use her own bed?
 

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I personally think that dogs will easily accept that one gets to go on the sofa and the other doesn't - they don't overthink it, it's just how it is. I don't think though that it means that the one without sofa privileges will assume from that that she is lower in the hierarchy (for the reasons I mentioned above). IMO it will only relate to who gets to go on the sofa, and won't have any effect on any other part of their relationship. But if it helps your boxer relax after having to accept the newcomer, then that's good.
 
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