Dog Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Advice needed please

Hi all. Today I was cuddling my dog when he started humping me. I know it's not his fault and he can't control that kind of thing, but I obviously wanted him off of me. I yelled "no, off" at him and he didn't listen so I pushed him and he got right back on, so I smacked his butt to get his attention and yelled "no, off".

Now, my dog loves his butt smacked lightly, I guess it feels good haha, and I always smack his butt lightly to get his attention when he isn't paying attention, but this time was a little harder. I don't think it actually hurt him, but It definitely startled him and got him off of me. I can't stop feeling bad about it though, and I just would like some advice... Is it okay to smack your dog's butt in that kind of case where you can't get his attention? Again, it was not all that hard... But harder than a normal and pleasurable butt pat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Hi all. I have a black lab with humping tendencies. Today he started jumping me and I yelled at him to get off, and he didn't... So I smacked his butt to get his attention and he got off and acted all ashamed and sad that I yelled. Now, I often smack his butt lightly to get his attention, and he loves having it patted aggressively (lol), but I'm wondering what you all think about a firm butt smack to get attention.

I have no intention of using physical force to harm my dog, but in this case it worked to alarm him and get his attention which is what I wanted.

I guess I am just looking for some advice on this topic... I am a new first time dog owner and it has been a lot to learn, and I want to do everything I can to be a good dog-dad :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,208 Posts
Hi all. Today I was cuddling my dog when he started humping me. I know it's not his fault and he can't control that kind of thing
You're totally wrong about this. It is completely his fault and he can control that kind of thing. Dogs can control their actions just like people can. Not to the same degree but they can and should employ self-control, and they have the ability to learn rude and polite behavior. This IS bad behavior and you should have corrected it and gotten him off you. However hitting the dog isn't the way to go. I wouldn't hit him again but sometimes we impulsively do things like this, so don't beat yourself up. And if your dog as big I can see the instinct to use more force even just to get him off. If this happens again and he gets right back I would recommend getting up and getting a hold of the dog's collar, or crating or tethering him for a time out for a few minutes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
254 Posts
The only time I ever physically smacked my dog was on the nose when she decided it was a good idea to bite an power cord. I think she thought it was a snake and she could just pick it up. Her normal "leave it" command was not working. It was immediate, physical danger which I could not overcome in any other way.

Corporal punishment is increasingly show to show bad behavior in children, and one can reason that dogs, with less mental capacity, would fare even worse. Hitting is never a way to deal with repeat bad behavior, it's a last-bet final one-time shove a child out of the way of a moving car sort of thing.

My dog loves rough play and one of her favorite games is when I "kick/shove" her away from the couch. And honestly, I think that's what most dogs end up thinking of anything less than abusive hitting...to them it's a game.

Dogs who are displaying an unwanted behavior need to immediately loose their greatest treasure---attention.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,820 Posts
I agree he can control that type of behavior. Humping can be sexual, but in the case of your dog it sounds like excitement, and he choose that outlet for it. You're pushing him likely made him think you were trying to play and escalated his response.

Try removing yourself from the situation if he tries it again. Humping dog causes fun human to go away. You'll need to do that every time he humps for the lesson to stick. You only need to go away for a minute or two, any longer and he's likely not to pair the humping with you're going away. If he tries targeting other dogs you can use the same method, and take him away for a time out before letting him back.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,911 Posts
Idk that I completely agree that dogs have complete control of humping in all situations...
Humping like described normally happens when a dog is either overstimulated (stressed/overwhelmed by situation or environment) or understimulated (pent of energy). Neither allows for clear thinking and decision making... often the dog has poor impulse control, little coping ability, and is overthreshold same a reactive dog barking at a trigger. Just a different behavior. I don't think they know humping is ''bad''... humping is a normal animal behavior. Inappropriate at times sure, but normal. Some behaviorists even categorize humping as a fixed action pattern (behavior animals are born with due to genetics, and triggered by environment).

That's not to say they can't learn what we do want from them. They can! They can learn some impulse control and alternative/incompatible behaviors. Anyway, just my opinion.

Henshawb, to really bring an end to the humping it's likely you'll have to manage your dog to prevent humping as well as working impulse control exercises and addressing the cause of the humping (calm/relaxation exercises and desensitization for overstimulation, exercise and mental stimulation for understimulation). As you go about training, I would handle any humping similarly to the others. I would try to avoid the smack and yell. I would likely remove myself or interrupt (likely calmly using collar to remove him from me) and then immediately redirecting to a more appropriate activity such as a chew toy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Idk that I completely agree that dogs have complete control of humping in all situations...
Humping like described normally happens when a dog is either overstimulated (stressed/overwhelmed by situation or environment) or understimulated (pent of energy). Neither allows for clear thinking and decision making... often the dog has poor impulse control, little coping ability, and is overthreshold same a reactive dog barking at a trigger. Just a different behavior. I don't think they know humping is ''bad''... humping is a normal animal behavior. Inappropriate at times sure, but normal. Some behaviorists even categorize humping as a fixed action pattern (behavior animals are born with due to genetics, and triggered by environment).

That's not to say they can't learn what we do want from them. They can! They can learn some impulse control and alternative/incompatible behaviors. Anyway, just my opinion.

Henshawb, to really bring an end to the humping it's likely you'll have to manage your dog to prevent humping as well as working impulse control exercises and addressing the cause of the humping (calm/relaxation exercises and desensitization for overstimulation, exercise and mental stimulation for understimulation). As you go about training, I would handle any humping similarly to the others. I would try to avoid the smack and yell. I would likely remove myself or interrupt (likely calmly using collar to remove him from me) and then immediately redirecting to a more appropriate activity such as a chew toy.

Could you direct me to some calm and relaxation or desensitization exercises? I think the case may be that my dog gets over excited very easily in a lot of situations, and humping is one of his responses.

He also does this with other dogs. And when people first come over to the house he is so excited he often pees on the floor and humps them, or I hold him back and he is literally flipping around and desperately clawing at the floor to get to them.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top