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I'm genuinely not sure. The dogs in our family have either had it or hadn't. The tendency to stay close to home that is. My parents keep their dog on a stake when she's outside because she does most definitely not have that tendency, my dog, on the other hand, is very well behaved loose on the property, as was the dog I grew up w.
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When they're supervised, you can train them to stay close. But unsupervised it's all on the dogs personality. Some stay really close and never wander, some stay close but occasionally wander, and some go way too far all the time. It's not something you can really train.
 

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I think it also depends on the dog breed. My golden retriever is an outdoor dog and she is immensely loyal to me, so she rarely wanders. Back when she was two she got lost for about a week, and I think that took the fire out of her. I would imagine dogs like spitzes and other independent, high energy dogs may lean more towards the wandering side of things. If you teach them to always stay beside you and you are around them as much as I am with my pup(read: a lot), they would be more likely to stay near. If you are busy and don't give them a lot of reason to stay beside the house, I would expect them to get bored, especially if they are the type to need to work. More chill dogs are much more likely to be homebodies.
 

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Honestly I think many rural people just trust their dog will return on its own, like with outdoor cats. And really, many do but it is a risk.
 

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Honestly I think many rural people just trust their dog will return on its own, like with outdoor cats. And really, many do but it is a risk.
It's not just a risk to the dog, it's also extremely inconsiderate to surrounding humans to let your dog wander around unchecked. I've been chased on horseback, bum rushed on foot, had my car chased. I can't even walk my reactive dog around here for fear of other people's wandering dogs. Seriously, people, keep your dogs where they belong...
 

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Dogs get a 'feel' from the owner for what territory is theirs by being with the owner has he is out and about. You call him back when he's someplace he shouldn't be, and he learns. It's like how a dog learns so much other stuff without being directly trained, like what his name is, what your daily routine is, etc.
 

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If someone were to buy a farm and get a dog, I'd assume that the boundaries are marked by a fence. It may be an old fence with wires that sag so far down they are all but hidden in the grass, but it's pretty rare to not find any fence demarking land boundaries...except in the case where at one time a farmer had a big piece of land and then divided off and sold a smaller bit of it. If there is no fence, you need to put one up IMHO, entirely irrelevant to having a dog, but marking boundaries is important in agricultural areas. Existing fence-lines have a higher claim LEGALLY demarking borders and defining whose land is whose land than the best GPS survey results.

Anyways, walk that fenceline daily, or if its too big, walk a section of it daily. Have your dog accompany you on leash or off leash once his recall is good. Let him frolic and play and sniff and dig etc, but when he crosses over give him a command like 'back on this side buddy'. Initially combine it with calling him all the way back to you, but after a few days, you can cal him 'back on this side buddy' and then turn around and keep on walking, or doing whatever you are doing (like fixing the fence) and he'll soon get the idea that 'back on this side' means he doesn't have to necessarily run all the way back to you, just come close past some imaginary boundary. Pretty soon he'll start to connect what boundaries he crosses that triggers the call, and what boundaries triggers you going back do doing your own thing

Oh, and the best thing for teaching a farm dog about boundaries, or how to move cattle, or the day to day routine...is another farm dog.
 

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If someone were to buy a farm and get a dog, I'd assume that the boundaries are marked by a fence. It may be an old fence with wires that sag so far down they are all but hidden in the grass, but it's pretty rare to not find any fence demarking land boundaries...except in the case where at one time a farmer had a big piece of land and then divided off and sold a smaller bit of it. If there is no fence, you need to put one up IMHO, entirely irrelevant to having a dog, but marking boundaries is important in agricultural areas. Existing fence-lines have a higher claim LEGALLY demarking borders and defining whose land is whose land than the best GPS survey results.

Anyways, walk that fenceline daily, or if its too big, walk a section of it daily. Have your dog accompany you on leash or off leash once his recall is good. Let him frolic and play and sniff and dig etc, but when he crosses over give him a command like 'back on this side buddy'. Initially combine it with calling him all the way back to you, but after a few days, you can cal him 'back on this side buddy' and then turn around and keep on walking, or doing whatever you are doing (like fixing the fence) and he'll soon get the idea that 'back on this side' means he doesn't have to necessarily run all the way back to you, just come close past some imaginary boundary. Pretty soon he'll start to connect what boundaries he crosses that triggers the call, and what boundaries triggers you going back do doing your own thing

Oh, and the best thing for teaching a farm dog about boundaries, or how to move cattle, or the day to day routine...is another farm dog.
Good advice... but there are some dogs who wont even after that - stay inside the boundaries.

Ella for an example. My family has a big country side property and yeah, she`ll stick around for the first 10 minutes. Then after everything is sniffed and checked, she`ll head out to check the rest of the village.....
I might be tangling a raw piece of meat between my teeth and she still doesn`t care. She`s an explorer. After the "village-round" she comes back (about 15min later) and starts to guard... and where? About 50 m from our property lines, right smack in the middle of a village road in front of a neighbour`s house.

She is tethered now when we are there and is taken on 2 daily off-leash walks.

I have tried after all this tethered time to see if she has a better clue about the property lines/boundaries .. nope. Still goes sits smack in the middle of that public road, lol.

She also will investigate when someone unusual is out and about. So it`s either fence or chain with her.
 
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