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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

I am wondering if anyone can help me get started with a raw food diet for my pup Bella. I recently switched her from Hills to Natural Balance which seems to be better. However, she is now uninterested in the food. I think raw would be the best bet for her, health wise and interest wise, however, I don't know how to feed her raw! I know there are a lot of posts about raw, but I was wondering if anyone can help me personally since my situation could differ from others.

A little bit about Bella for those of you who don't know.. She is a 2 1/2 year old black Lab and Border Collie mix and weighs 55 pounds. She has had anal gland problems (soft stool) and a few infections (ear and bladder) which I think are from a food allergy. She went from Blue Buffalo to Hills and it got worse, so I recently switched her to Natural Balance which she liked at first and is now uninterested. A few things though, she has been on Clavaseptin (antibiotic) for a week now and yesterday and today she vomited 1 time each day-not a lot but did get sick, as well, I think she is starting her heat. All of these things could be making her sick, but food, antibiotics, and heat aside, I would really like to switch her to raw because to me it would be the healthiest for her as its whole food and the most natural.

If anyone can help me figure out how to start feeding her raw food, that would be so greatly appreciated!

Thank you,
Kerri
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I should also mention that I have read a lot of reviews about raw diets and many say it is unsafe which I am a little concerned about. I really want whats best for my dog.. so I don't want to feed kibble because I feel that even though there are some high quality kibbles out there, it still isn't great. But, I also don't want to make my dog sick from raw food (parasites, etc.). So I don't know what to do!
 

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I've been raw feeding my dogs for nearly 12 years, never had a parasite issue. Your dog will not get parasites from commercially raised food. Also a dogs system is designed to handle raw meat and bone. It will probably take your dog a bit of time to completely adjust to the new diet. I've always switched my dogs over cold turkey. Start out with chicken, it's the easiest to digest. Boney pieces to start, backs and leg quarters are good. Stay away from organs at first, they can cause loose stools. You want to feed about 2-3% of your dogs ideal body weight, but all dogs are different and some need more or less. I don't weigh my guys food anymore, just eye it. And if they seem they need more I give them a bit more. They get a bit chunky and I give a bit less. Vegas is now about 65lbs, but in his younger years held about 55lbs. He eats about 10-12oz.

Feeding raw is very simple, take meat and hand it to the dog. Done. I teach everyone to eat on a mat, in my case they are towels. If you have a table or chair nearby just take a leash and tie them to it. They learn quickly to stay on their mats. Some feed in a crate, I also feed outside when it's nice out.

After your dog is doing well on chicken you can add a new protein source, I'd go with turkey or pork. Beef is a bit rich and you want to go slow with it or it could give your dog the runs. Every few weeks add a new meat in, then you can start with organs. I normally feed organs on nights they get boney meals, it helps keep everything firm.

There are risk with everything, and kibble isn't completely safe either. To me the risk is minimal and the reward is well worth it. Vegas had horrible ear infections til I switched him to raw. My mom's scottie had bad allergies, and once switched they cleared up too. My dogs don't have that doggy smell and get bathed twice a year. Petting them also doesn't leave your hands feeling oily like I notice with many kibble fed dogs. I don't use flea/tick 'meds' because they are not attractive to fleas. I do spray them with a mix I made up before going into the woods, but they rarely get any bugs on them. They have never had their teeth cleaned and they still look good, even at nearly 13 years old. As puppies none of my guys were destructive chewing on things. I don't believe I got some of the few non chewing puppies. I believe that all the chewing they do with their normal meals satisfy their need to chew.
 

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I don't feed raw right now, but wanted to chime in and say that those who say it is unsafe either don't know how a dog's digestive system works or are concerned about contamination toward humans - just follow basic food safety guidelines and you'll be just fine.
 

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I should also mention that I have read a lot of reviews about raw diets and many say it is unsafe which I am a little concerned about. I really want whats best for my dog.. so I don't want to feed kibble because I feel that even though there are some high quality kibbles out there, it still isn't great. But, I also don't want to make my dog sick from raw food (parasites, etc.). So I don't know what to do!
Raw feeding is not dangerous, its species appropriate. What do think wolves eat? Fed in variety, raw meat/bones/ organs provide all that is needed.

Parasites are in the intestines, ( with the exception of wild boar) which aren't fed anyway. The bacteria that is in all rae meat, dogs are designed by nature to eat.
http://preymodelraw.com
Kibble is man made, full of chemicals and artificial ingredients, and only been around about 60 years. Dogs, have been around thriving for thousands of years, long before people. What do you think ate? Read the link I put above. Good info, and forums of all raw feeders.
 

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Everyone is hesitant to convert to raw, but you get used to it quickly - and so will your dog. We feed both raw and cooked, the dog enjoys both. He's not one for raw organs, and i'm tired of having to slice and freeze liver for him so he gets it at least semi cooked.

More and more i'm meeting raw feeders, not hard to tell by looking at the dog.

I will never personally feed another dog kibble.
 

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I feed organs frozen, Vegas and Shorty will not eat thawed organs even though liver is Vegas's favorite. I think it's the texture. But since I freeze everything anyway it's no big deal to just pull that out right before feeding. Freyja is a garbage disposal and will eat anything so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hey everyone!

Thanks for giving me the info! I too believe a dog should be fine since that is what its ancestors ate. I just wasn't sure if it is safer to cook it than feed strictly raw. Since we have had so many issues with Bella and her food (i.e., allergies like ear infections, bladder infections and anal gland problems, as well as being uninterested in kibble), I really want to switch to raw whole food. I just have a few more questions:

1. Do you recommend feeding raw, or slightly cooking it?
2. How many times do you feed your dogs?
3. How much food do you feed PER meal? (Bella is a 55 pound lab and border collie mix)
4. What protein do you think is the best? Are there any safer proteins? I am not sure I like the idea of pork since I don't personally eat it. And, I think she is allergic to both chicken and salmon after eating it so long...
5. Should I include veggies/fruit? If so what kind?

I think these are the only other questions I have unless I think of some more :) Again, thank you all so much for your input and help!!

Have a great day and talk soon!
Kerri
 

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1) Slightly cooking it is typically to make sure you dog will eat the organs. Sometimes dogs don't like the texture, so you can sear the sides (not cook) and they will eat it. I prefer grinding it into a mix at first, but Aayla eats it just normal now.

2) I feed Aayla once a day. Thats best for digestion, typically towards the end of the day. Cause a single meal that is too heavy in bone or organ can cause digestive issues. Its hard to make equal meals for multiple times a day.

3) Typically about 2-3% of their ideal body weight. So if you dog is in great shape at 55 lbs then you would feed about 17.5 oz per day.

4) You should be feeding a rotation of at least 4 different meats. So Aayla right now has meals prepped using chicken, turkey, beef, pork and lamb. Pork is a great, cheaper meat to get. So we always have pork in our meals.

5) I feed prey model, so no fruits of veggies are needed. The diet is essentially (when you get your pup used to all the meats) 80% meat, 10% bone, 5% liver and 5% other organs. I give fruit and veggies sometimes as treats but not for her meals. Though if you are doing eats that are not grass fed you should add oily fish (mackeral, sardines or fish oil).
 

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Kerri, we switches to full raw in December 2014 and fed strictly raw for a year for health reasons as well, still believe it was the best choice for him. Don't get too caught up in measures and portions or contents of each meal. Generally as long as they get the right amounts over the course of say a week, all good.

Poop, get used to it, tells the tale of how your dog is doing. If the dog is getting fat, cut back or vice versa. There is no magic recipe to raw.



All that said, when we switched vets in December past, she wanted us to try a "cooked" food trial with some veg. Little bugger loves it cooked, we'll make a soup using meat and organs, veg etc. We feed both raw and cooked now, the dog "soup" makes it easy to get probiotics and any other stuff he needs into him. Generally, we feed one raw meal, one cooked meal and we don't see issues - other than the increase in poop of course. Not proposing cooked meals, but it is what it is.

Many dogs as said have issue with the texture of organs. Raw liver, he'll pick it up and fling it - frozen strips he will gorge on. You'll get used to what your dogs wants or doesn't.

Good luck - you've made a wonderful choice in feeding :) i'll never lay another bowl of kibble for dog.
 

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Hey everyone!

Thanks for giving me the info! I too believe a dog should be fine since that is what its ancestors ate. I just wasn't sure if it is safer to cook it than feed strictly raw. Since we have had so many issues with Bella and her food (i.e., allergies like ear infections, bladder infections and anal gland problems, as well as being uninterested in kibble), I really want to switch to raw whole food. I just have a few more questions:

1. Do you recommend feeding raw, or slightly cooking it?
2. How many times do you feed your dogs?
3. How much food do you feed PER meal? (Bella is a 55 pound lab and border collie mix)
4. What protein do you think is the best? Are there any safer proteins? I am not sure I like the idea of pork since I don't personally eat it. And, I think she is allergic to both chicken and salmon after eating it so long...
5. Should I include veggies/fruit? If so what kind?

I think these are the only other questions I have unless I think of some more :) Again, thank you all so much for your input and help!!

Have a great day and talk soon!
Kerri
1)Totally raw. The more you cook, the more nutrients you lose. You can temporarily sear very lightly organs just to get them to eat if it helps, but back off the searing as they begin to eat them.

2)mine are all adult, or close enough that they eat once per day. You can feed twice if you prefer.

3)I feed according to each dogs body condition and activity level. Percentages can get to complicated.

4)Red meats are the most nutritious, but all the proteins you can add the better.

5)No veggies or fruits. Dogs have no biological need, and actually don't digest them very well. What little is in them, is also in raw meat/bones/organs in a much more usable form for the dogs body.
 

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1. Do you recommend feeding raw, or slightly cooking it?
2. How many times do you feed your dogs?
3. How much food do you feed PER meal? (Bella is a 55 pound lab and border collie mix)
4. What protein do you think is the best? Are there any safer proteins? I am not sure I like the idea of pork since I don't personally eat it. And, I think she is allergic to both chicken and salmon after eating it so long...
5. Should I include veggies/fruit? If so what kind?


Kerri
1. Raw, no need to cook it. This goes to number 4 too, but some dogs that are allergic to a cooked protein do just fine with raw. Cooking changes the molecule makeup of the protein.

2. Freyja gets fed twice because of Dane's risk of bloating. Otherwise I would feed her once a day like the boys. I don't like splitting the meals up, I'd rather give one big piece that the dogs have to work at rather than cut it up and have them be done in half a minute.

3. Amounts vary on activities and even time of year. I don't weigh the food out, I'm pretty good at eyeing by now. The guide is to feed about 2-3% of your dogs ideal body weight. I'll also feed a bit more one day and then feed a bit less the next sometimes. Vegas is about the same weight as your dog, he eats about 10oz/day. But he is also nearly 13 now and had put on a bit of weight and I cut him back to get him back into shape.

4. There is no 'best' proteins, variety is key. Chicken is normally best to start with, but if you dog has issues with that I'd try turkey. Pork is a great protein, with great edible bones that keep most dogs busy for a bit. I feed a lot of pork, it's also cheap. I also feed a lot of mackerel and sardines, both are cheaper than salmon but have a good amount of omega 3 fatty acids. Pork makes up a good part of my dogs diet, followed by chicken and turkey, oily fish, some beef, veal, lamb and when I can find it goat. Plus the odd duck, rabbit and anything else I can find.

5. I started out feeding veggies, but soon dropped it. The dogs didn't like them so it was always a fight and I did more research and now follow prey model raw. I haven't feed veggies for a very long time and my guys seem just fine without them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
1. Raw, no need to cook it. This goes to number 4 too, but some dogs that are allergic to a cooked protein do just fine with raw. Cooking changes the molecule makeup of the protein.

2. Freyja gets fed twice because of Dane's risk of bloating. Otherwise I would feed her once a day like the boys. I don't like splitting the meals up, I'd rather give one big piece that the dogs have to work at rather than cut it up and have them be done in half a minute.

3. Amounts vary on activities and even time of year. I don't weigh the food out, I'm pretty good at eyeing by now. The guide is to feed about 2-3% of your dogs ideal body weight. I'll also feed a bit more one day and then feed a bit less the next sometimes. Vegas is about the same weight as your dog, he eats about 10oz/day. But he is also nearly 13 now and had put on a bit of weight and I cut him back to get him back into shape.

4. There is no 'best' proteins, variety is key. Chicken is normally best to start with, but if you dog has issues with that I'd try turkey. Pork is a great protein, with great edible bones that keep most dogs busy for a bit. I feed a lot of pork, it's also cheap. I also feed a lot of mackerel and sardines, both are cheaper than salmon but have a good amount of omega 3 fatty acids. Pork makes up a good part of my dogs diet, followed by chicken and turkey, oily fish, some beef, veal, lamb and when I can find it goat. Plus the odd duck, rabbit and anything else I can find.

5. I started out feeding veggies, but soon dropped it. The dogs didn't like them so it was always a fight and I did more research and now follow prey model raw. I haven't feed veggies for a very long time and my guys seem just fine without them.
I am headed to the grocery store right now. Bella was sick a little bit this morning again and so I am so through with Kibble!! So off to the grocery store now to get some meat.

Thank you to everyone who gave me all of this information. I was thinking about starting with turkey since chicken has been a problem with Bella. Is turkey different than chicken allergy wise? I don't want to feed pork really and have heard beef is the highest allergy with chicken as the second.

I am so sorry but I still don't understand how to give my dog 80% meat, and the rest bone and organ. For instance, if I go to the grocery store and buy a turkey breast, where do I get the bones and organ? What kind of bones do I feed? Is there a chance of choking??? Also, do I essentially just give her a slab of raw meat, bones and organ and put it in her dish? This is all soooo new to me!

Thanks again everyone!!
Kerri
 

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When we started feeding raw, we tried to give the percentages per meal - doesn't work very well. It's a bit nerve wracking starting off, but you're feeding a dog, not putting a man on the moon.

Look at feedings over the course of a week. Our dog is small and easy to feed. He wouldn't touch organs that were raw, it's the texture, but he wouldn't hesitate to eat them frozen. As long as your dog is getting what they need over the course of a week, then you're golden.

Avoid organ meats for the first couple of weeks, they are rich and can cause diarrhea if introduced too quickly.
Make sure your dog chews and swallows, some dogs will gulp the meals.
If you feed straight meat for one meal, give a bone in meal for the other.

Check the poop, that tells the tale of how your dog is doing. Stool too loose generally needs more bone. Too hard, let up on the bone.

Good luck.
 

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You can start out with turkey if you'd like. I would still try chicken at some point because many dogs are fine with the meat raw, even if they are allergic to it cooked or in kibble. You want to start out a little heavy on the bone at first, helps to keep poops firmer. The percentage is a guide, just feed mostly meat with a little bone and organs. You do not need to feed organ daily, I do weekly most of the time. Raw feeding is about balance over time. As for bone each dog is different and you will get a feel for what you dog needs.

Pork is a great protein, but if you don't want to feed it then that is up to you. You don't want to depend on poultry though, so you're left with beef, lamb/mutton, goat and venison.

Turkey is completely different than chicken, just because your dog has a chicken allergy doesn't mean she'll have a problem with turkey.

Feeding, I just hand my dogs their meals and they eat either on a mat in the kitchen or out back depending on weather. If you buy a turkey breast it should have the breast bone on it. I would buy a whole turkey, it's cheaper per pound. But it might be a bit much to tackle at first. If you feed a turkey leg or thigh it has the bone in it. I can easily find beef, pork and chicken organs locally. The others I have to order online if I want them. When I feed organs I feed a boney piece of meat, like a turkey neck or chicken back.

I don't normally buy just bone, I get whatever bone is in the meat. Beef bones aren't really edible, they are more for chewing. Pork bones are edible and I use them a lot along with chicken and turkey.

RE choking. There is always a chance of choking, whether it be bone, raw meat, kibble, biscuits or other treats. A good rule is to either feed in large pieces your dog can not swallow whole or cut it up into smaller pieces. You'll get to know your dog and if she is a gulper or not. I also worried about choking when I first started, now not so much. I still keep an eye on everyone at meal time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Hello everyone,

Thanks again for helping me and giving me so much information! I will definitely try raw chicken. However, with poultry, do I have to be concerned about making Bella sick with salmonella?

Just to verify I understand what everyone is suggesting:

-Veggies are not required because it does very little for the dog.
-Bella's meal should be 2-3% of her weight, which is 1.65lbs of meat a day?
-80% meat, 20% bone and 10% organ?
-Don't start organ until a few weeks of raw meat/bones to get her used to it.
-Feed organs weekly, not daily?
-Essentially, give her a raw piece of meat with bone in and let her eat it all.

Today I bought 2 turkey breasts with no bones (not thinking). Is this ok to start and the next time I buy meat I can buy with bone. Would you recommend slow transition with cooked brown rice? She has been sick lately (not sure if this is from Natural Balance or antibiotics) and so am a little concerned about switching her cold turkey (no pun intended LOL) again.

What cut is recommended with bone? Thighs? And its ok for me to give her the whole thigh with bone in and she can eat the whole thing? Bone and all-all bones are safe besides beef? I heard that chicken bones aren't safe to give because they can get stuck in their intestines and cause huge problems. I am so sorry but I want to be 100% sure I am doing what I am supposed to.

Also, do you recommend switching the protein every so often? If so, how often?

I know once I get this down, Bella will be healthier in the long run! I am going to look into local butchers to get some cuts cheaper :) I am taking her in to have her rechecked to make sure her bladder infection is gone in the morning. I just KNOW my vet will not recommend feeding her raw but I am so sick of her having so many health issues!! Hoping raw will help me fix that for her.

Just want to make sure she won't get sick or have worse health issues (especially with bacteria and bones getting stuck).

Thanks again everyone and look forward to hearing from you!
Kerri
 

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Turkey is probably fine to start off with, but chicken is probably better. No, you're not going to give your dog salmonella and chicken bones are fine when raw. Just try to ensure your dog isn't a gulper and swallows food whole. They can and will eat chicken bone and all, the minpin will destroy a drumstick in minutes when he's hungry.

Allergies? Kibble is different from whole raw meats. The may be something in the kibble your dog is reacting to, it's not necessarily the chicken itself. Bear in mind that much chicken out there is "enhanced" meaning there's extra sodium that a dog doesn't need.


You might want to check out preymodelraw.com as well, some great writeups on starting out - and lots of people in common. Helped out greatly when I started the dog on raw.

With organs, bone, meats - as naturalfed said above - don't get too wrapped up in percentages. Every dog is different - highly active dogs will require more food, others less. Plan for the average percentage over the course of a week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Turkey is probably fine to start off with, but chicken is probably better. No, you're not going to give your dog salmonella and chicken bones are fine when raw. Just try to ensure your dog isn't a gulper and swallows food whole. They can and will eat chicken bone and all, the minpin will destroy a drumstick in minutes when he's hungry.

Allergies? Kibble is different from whole raw meats. The may be something in the kibble your dog is reacting to, it's not necessarily the chicken itself. Bear in mind that much chicken out there is "enhanced" meaning there's extra sodium that a dog doesn't need.


You might want to check out preymodelraw.com as well, some great writeups on starting out - and lots of people in common. Helped out greatly when I started the dog on raw.

With organs, bone, meats - as naturalfed said above - don't get too wrapped up in percentages. Every dog is different - highly active dogs will require more food, others less. Plan for the average percentage over the course of a week.
Hey there!

I will feed her the turkey and see how it goes! I will also try chicken.

I went to preymodelraw.com and it has a lot of advice, but I see a lot of concerns/problems that people have had? Most notable that concerned me is bloody stool :S I'm afraid to end up with a dog who has to have a bone removed! :S
 

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You do not need to be concerned about salmonella and your dog. First a dogs digestive tract is able to handle it if it were to be present in the chicken. A dogs GI track is shorter then our own, so it would pass through before it had a chance to set up. Their stomachs are also very acidic.

-No veggies is fine. They can not break them down and will gain very little from them. They have the short GI track of a carnivore.
-2% of 55lbs(I think that is what you said she weighed) is 1.1lb per day. So say 1lb. That would be too much for Vegas who weighs about the same. But it's a good starting point. If she starts to gain too much weight you can always cut it back some.
-The break down is 80% meat, 10%bone, 10%organs with half that being liver. Think of it as mostly meat, a little bone and a little organs. In the beginning you may need to feed a bit more bone.
-You don't need to worry about feeding organs for a few weeks to a couple of months. Wait until she is doing well on the meat/bone then add in, slowly.
-You can feed organs daily if you want, but I don't. Weekly works fine. Remember, it's balance over time. It doesn't have to be exact every day.
-Exactly. Hand her the meat and let her go to town.

How has she been sick?
I wouldn't start on boneless meat, you really want the bone to help keep her stools firm and not give her the runs. Though some dogs handle it better then others. I would not add rice but if you feel better switching her slowly you could add a small piece of the boneless turkey you have in with her normal food. Say a small one by one inch square. then the next day add two and keep increasing it.
If she has been on antibiotics I'd give her some probiotics to help her gut flora repopulate.

Any cut of meat is fine, raw feeding is very flexible. Thighs, legs, backs, leg quarters(chicken, turkey leg quarters would be huge) necks with added meat, like breast. I'd stay with bone in pieces to start. It depends on the size of the thigh if she can eat the whole thing. I sometimes have to cut a little meat off it. But yes, she can eat the whole thing, no problem.

All bones are fine, some are just not edible. They would be considered recreational. Most beef bones are recreational. But stay away from leg/femur/knuckle bones of cattle and other large animals. They can break teeth if your dog is a strong chewer. But beef rib bones, fed in a slab of three or more make a good meal.

COOKED bones are not safe, any cooked bones. They can splinter. Raw bones are soft and safe to feed. My guys have been eating chicken bones for 12 years without an issue.

Variety is key, you don't want to feed just one type of meat. I always have at least chicken, fish and pork in my freezer. I don't plan meals, just reach in and grab whatever. So yes, you want to always have variety. Though there have been times I've fed chicken or pork for a few weeks at a time before adding something else in. Right now I have a good variety in the freezer. Pork, beef, chicken, turkey, sardines, rabbit, duck, green tripe. But basically they get whatever is on sale at the time.

Many vets do not recommend raw feeding. But they have very little training in nutrition, unless they decide to learn more. I tend not to bring it up. I love my vet now, they are all for raw feeding, minimal vax and a more natural approach to health and healing.

I understand your worrying. I use to worry I was doing it wrong or it wasn't the right thing to do. But I see the benefits and how great they are doing. There is an adjustment period in the beginning. You just have to ride it out. Once Bella adjust to the new diet I think she will do great. I've seen it help dogs with health issues.
 
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Hello everyone,

Thanks again for helping me and giving me so much information! I will definitely try raw chicken. However, with poultry, do I have to be concerned about making Bella sick with salmonella?

Just to verify I understand what everyone is suggesting:

-Veggies are not required because it does very little for the dog.
-Bella's meal should be 2-3% of her weight, which is 1.65lbs of meat a day?
-80% meat, 20% bone and 10% organ?
-Don't start organ until a few weeks of raw meat/bones to get her used to it.
-Feed organs weekly, not daily?
-Essentially, give her a raw piece of meat with bone in and let her eat it all.

Today I bought 2 turkey breasts with no bones (not thinking). Is this ok to start and the next time I buy meat I can buy with bone. Would you recommend slow transition with cooked brown rice? She has been sick lately (not sure if this is from Natural Balance or antibiotics) and so am a little concerned about switching her cold turkey (no pun intended LOL) again.

What cut is recommended with bone? Thighs? And its ok for me to give her the whole thigh with bone in and she can eat the whole thing? Bone and all-all bones are safe besides beef? I heard that chicken bones aren't safe to give because they can get stuck in their intestines and cause huge problems. I am so sorry but I want to be 100% sure I am doing what I am supposed to.

Also, do you recommend switching the protein every so often? If so, how often?

I know once I get this down, Bella will be healthier in the long run! I am going to look into local butchers to get some cuts cheaper :) I am taking her in to have her rechecked to make sure her bladder infection is gone in the morning. I just KNOW my vet will not recommend feeding her raw but I am so sick of her having so many health issues!! Hoping raw will help me fix that for her.

Just want to make sure she won't get sick or have worse health issues (especially with bacteria and bones getting stuck).

Thanks again everyone and look forward to hearing from you!
Kerri
No, you won't make your dog sick with raw chicken. Dogs are designed to be able to handle all the bacteria in raw. Salmonella isn't an issue.

Don't stress over the percentages. Those are nothing but guidelines, and all dogs are different and one will need more or less of something than another dog. Prey model is designed to be as similar as possible to eating in the wild, and there are no percentages there. They eat what they have that day to eat.

You can feed small amounts of organs daily, or a full meal weekly. Either is fine.

Yes, let her eat the whole piece of meat with bone too.

I would give the boneless turkey you bought, but give it with something with bone. Or save it until after you have transitioned all the way and feed it as a boneless meal. Either way will work. Just in the beginning during your transition through proteins, give bone in each meal involving a new protein. No rice or grains needed at all. They don't need them, and can't digest them well. Switching "cold turkey" is the best way to go to raw. The more you add otherwise, the more you risk digestive upset.

All chicken bones are safe, as long as they are fed raw. Turkey as well, turkey bones are just denser except for the necks. Turkey necks are the easiest of the bones to chew through.

During the transition, stay with one protein for at least a week at a time. after transitioned through all proteins feed all the variety daily that you can. For instance, something different everyday like pork one day, beef one day, the next venison, then another turkey etc....The more variety the better.

Bones won't get stuck as long as you feed large enough cuts that they have to chew, not gulp. Edible bone is fully digestable.
 
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