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Discussion Starter #1
I'm having a bit of trouble developing with my 1 year old rat terrier Chase, and our puppy Unna a terrier mix. She is 13 weeks and is the same size as him now, and still growing. Her feisty play is getting a bit much for him, and when he tries to 'correct' her she gets really wound up and snarly and I have to intervene. I just put her in her crate to cool off (in same room) and give Chase a chew toy. Then I let her out and redirect with a stuffed toy.
But Chase then tries to take any toy she has, and vice verca. They aren't really aggressive in trying to guard it or keep it to themselves, they are just both trying to "kill" the toy and sometimes nip or trample each other in the process. Then the offended party has a temper tantrum and they have to be separated. Doesn't matter if I use more than one toy, they both want the same one. I'd like to use the flirt pole for both of them but don't see how that cold work together. What are some ways to encourage peaceful or cooperative play between them? I get them both to sit and stay for treats at the same time, goes really well when treats are involved, and they will eat and drink together from the same bowl. It's just toys. Even long ones...they both want the same end. Will this competition end as they get older? Unna is clearly going to be bigger, stronger, and more 'dominant' than her older brother.
 

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For higher excitement level playtime, I usually separate my dogs, as they, like your guys, tend to be less than careful with their teeth when they're really "up", and an accidental nip or both grabbing the same toy is a pretty sure way to start a brawl. Sometimes, I could take them out and get one focused on one toy, then let the other off lead/out and give them their own, but if they both value the same toy, that is a no-go. Or, if you can find some way to ensure that both aren't getting to the same toy at the same time, particularly after racing each other to get to it, that might work. I could throw a ball up onto our patio roof and let it roll down for my two- because neither knew where it was going to come down, they couldn't really get too competitive unless it fell right between them. If they did have a tussle during play, I'd separate them and end play, unless one didn't participate, in which case they got to continue. Or I would take several balls (4+), and throw a ball for one in one direction, and the other the opposite. If you have a dog who likes to "covet" one toy and obsess over it, this won't work- and it helps if the toys aren't of the absolute highest value.

Flirtpole could be hit or miss for you, and I would play with both dogs separately to see what their play style is before you even think about trying to do it together. My two could chase together, but if both grabbed the lure, it became a game of tug, which 99% of the time meant an impending fight. So, flirtpole with two dogs became more about keeping the toy out of their mouths, lol. For that reason, I prefer to do it one dog at a time. Also, they can collide midair, or one can land on/run into the other, which can be a problem. Overall, I would generally recommend playing this game separately.

In the house, when one has a toy and the other is trying to take it/get involved, I verbally correct and redirect them to other toys. If they are insistent, they get leashed and/or put in a stay away from the other dog. I have had dogs (and in fact, one of my current brawlers was one of them, but with another very placid dog) which could share toys nicely, play together without conflict, etc, but my current two are/were (one is now 18, and doesn't do much playing anymore) very toy driven and not particularly tolerant of other dogs around their stuff.

Re: her getting wound up when he corrects her, I would try to intervene before he needs to correct her, and send both to settle/take a break for a few. Hopefully they'll learn to keep their play toned down a bit, but you should watch for signs of escalation, and separate/remove toys if you have any concern that someone may get hurt. It's a pain in the butt, but the fewer opportunities they have to practice that sort of behavior, the better off you will be in the long run.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
She is getting pretty relentless in her attacks on him. Redirecting her only works for a few moments before she loses interest in the toy or game and goes back to harassing Chase. It's the first thing she does when we let her out of the crate. He is into it too though and often instigates chases and wrestling and steals her stuff but when he has enough and wants to get away she won't back down. She has also latched onto his face a couple of times and he couldn't get her off, I had to, no damage but that is still worrying.
 
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