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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,
I was just visiting local shelter where I adopted my little Irka, and a certain dog catched my eye. He was a doge argentine mix (looks a lot like pitbull), he is not yet available for adoption and he is deaf. I am seriusly considering adoption. There are some obsticles and I made up my mind if he is still available after everything I will adopt him. But until then I will visit and walk him in shelter. But I have no idea how to deal with a deaf dog. Does anyone has any advice or experiance? He didn't seem agressive and was in a box with yorkie mix. He licked my hand when I came to see (just like Irka, that's why he walked right into my heart). Please, any advice would be welcome.
 

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I think @HaydenK could probably offer you a lot of advice, I know she has a deaf dog and one that is deaf and blind.
 

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Owning a deaf dog isn't that different than owning a hearing dog. The main difference is in the way that you communicate. The keys of training are the same -repeat and reward, repeat and reward - but instead of saying the command you sign it.

For me the part of this dog that sticks out most is not that it is deaf, but that it is a Dogo. I would seriously read up on the breed before you make a commitment to him. They are a large, intelligent, working breed bred to hunt wild boar and can be a lot to handle for people who don't have a lot of experience with working dogs - regardless of their hearing status.

If you decide to adopt this dog I absolutely recommend that you find a local trainer with deafie experience and commit to solid obedience training, particularly focusing on developing a strong recall and teaching the dog to "check in" with you periodically. In my experience recall is really the only major functional difference between deaf and hearing dogs - for a deaf dog you have to be in their sight line to call them back to you, which can be difficult if your dog has a strong prey or working drive.

If you have any specific questions, I am always here and happy to help, and I don't know if I am allowed to advertise it here but I do have a blog about raising and training my deaf and deafblind dogs. :)
 

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Training with hand signals is not that hard...I do both verbal and hand signals with all my training and Pax actually responds better with the visual cues than the verbal cues. He can do everything he has been trained to do without saying a word.

We spend a lot of time down at the beach and he constantly knows to check in with me and responds to a hand wave if I need him to come and is out of verbal range due to the surf and wind.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Just an update, it seems that he won't be up for adoption for a while, he seems to have some problem that shelter wants to deal with before they find him a home. They said it may be months. :) Thank you for all your stories. I am much more comfortable now and I will not shy away from a challenge. :D It feels me up with hope. Thank you.
 
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