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I have a 5 year old miniature dachshund, Kylie. She grew up with a variety of dog breeds. She thinks she is very big and will often chase the bigger dogs in my apartment complex, but will never come in physical contact with them (she will run up and bark but keep her distance). When it comes to other dogs coming into her house, she is not dominant at all - she will growl if they get near her food, but other than that they are free to roam without bothering her. She will snap if another dog is trying to play with her and she makes it clear that she doesn't want to play. She can easily live with another dog without instigating problems unless she is being bothered by the other dog. She has lived with me in college and gone through a cocker spaniel puppy, a chorkie, and a golden retriever - all of whom came into OUR apartment after we had already been living there and she did great with, and even eventually began playing with them. I am moving into a new apartment with a friend who has a 2 year old miniature dachshund named Honey. I have already noticed that Honey will do the same chasing of other dogs in the complex, but she will actually become physical and try to bite the other dog.

When Honey and Kylie are outside they are fine together - Honey can become a little aggressive at times, but she hasn't hurt Kylie while we were outside. When I just took Kylie over to look at the apartment (after 2 or 3 times of the dogs meeting outside on neutral territory) I immediately noticed that Honey becomes very territorial and dominant in her house, which I wasn't surprised about because she has never lived with another dog before. Kylie is a generally quiet dog, she just wants to sniff around and she will eventually become comfortable enough to lay down on the floor. Honey has already bit her once when Kylie tried to approach her owner, the rest of the times she has tried to express her dominance, her owner caught her before she could actually hurt Kylie.

I am not moving in until August, and we live in the same apartment complex, so getting the dogs together as often as possible from now until I move into the apartment, will be one good way to get them used to each other, but I was wondering if anyone else had any ideas or suggestions to get passed this dominance issue. Kylie has never nor shows any current attitude of wanting to be the dominant dog over Honey, but I don't want Kylie to get hurt.

Please let me have any suggestions on how to make this transition easier!!
 

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Hi,
First please know that the whole "dominance" theory has been thoroughly debunked over the last 10 years, notwithstanding some TV personalities. Your little girl is scared, not dominant: all her behavior indicates insecurity and the barking/chasing/growling etc., is her trying to keep all the other dogs away.

Honey, on the other hand, sounds like she is resource guarding - her home, her owner, whatever it is.

I'm sure you'll get lots of additional advice from people, but please read the information in these links:
https://apdt.com/pet-owners/choosing-a-trainer/dominance/
The Dominance Controversy | Philosophy | Dr. Sophia Yin, DVM, MS
Why Won't Dominance Die? | Association of Pet Behaviour Counsellors
http://behavior.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/local-assets/pdfs/AVSAB_Dominance_Statement.pdf
De-Bunking the "Alpha Dog" Theory - Whole Dog Journal Article

Once you've stopped interpreting your dogs behavior through dominance, you'll have a much better time at actually seeing what's going on, and be able to address it much more effectively.
 

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This isn't dominance, this is antisocial behavior. If this is how the leader of every dog 'pack' acted... Well, there wouldn't be much safety in numbers now, would there?!

Both dogs sound fearful, and especially around resources (like food, or an owner) or when in an enclosed space. Before moving in, you may want to purchase some baby-gates so that they can learn that sharing the house with each other does not mean going about their day constantly looking over their shoulder.

Fearful, reactive dogs are in a constant danger of setting each other off because they both expect the worst in dogs, and then go on the offensive (which, from a dog's point of view, is always the best defense!).

Once you have them partitioned, you have control over what sort of experiences they have with each other, and whether they are positive or negative. Positive is the obvious preference! Even if it means, for a while, that they are only visiting each other when there are no 'valuables' (food, toys, chews) lying around. Even if they are only freely interacting with each other during excursions outside. Walking is a great way to mend bridges between dogs because neither has much of an opportunity to confront/slight/harass the other.

Here are some articles that can help you monitor and control those situations for the best possible outcome:

http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/calming-signals-10084/
http://www.dogforum.com/training-be...y-leash-aggression-barrier-frustration-12538/
http://www.dogforum.com/training-behavior-stickies/dogs-social-behaviour-13482/
 
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