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Discussion Starter #1
I'm not quite ready to find a dog, but I'd like to at least be aware of some potential places to look when the time does come.

I'd like to either do an ovary sparing spay or a late spay on my puppy when I do find her. I'd also like to get a mixed breed dog that's expected to be (can't know for sure with a mutt!) mid-sized and intelligent. The trouble I'm running into is that shelters and rescues tend to rip out the sex organs as soon as they can put the puppy under anesthesia. I've seen 2 month old puppies for sale/adoption that were marked as having been spayed/neutered! That's craziness... anyway, Where can I look and how can I find a puppy that hasn't been desexed? I also do have definite breed preferences that may or may not change by the time I get a dog. I don't want just any random dog.
 

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I'm not sure about Oregon, however in Florida it is illegal to adopt out a dog that has not been fixed. So a lot of younger dogs get fixed early so they have a better chance of being adopted while they are still very young which is something a lot of people look for.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I had considered a breeder, but as I browse Petfinder.com, I find that there are many dogs on there I wouldn't mind having. The only issue is the spay/neuter thing. Then there's also the cost difference... a few hundred tops versus 1000+. There's also the aspect of not contributing to the overpopulation problem.
 

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I think you will find it extremely difficult, if not impossible to get an intact dog from a shelter. Since so many dogs come in and out, they tend to get neutered very quickly.
 

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The only thing I can think is maybe finding a smaller private rescue. Sometimes I've seen they will adopt out dogs with spay/neuter contracts to save the shelter money.
 

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Honestly makes sense from a shelter pov to alter early. Need to make sure their animals aren't leaving and later reproducing. Even with contracts, spay/neuter vouchers, refundable deposits, and other systems many animals leave and aren't actually altered. Then there's the added work (additional records, needing to track down people to verify altering, etc.) to already overworked employees...

Anyway, in my area some rescue groups will adopt out puppies with a spay/neuter contract (normally requiring at approx. 6 months) and purchase of a voucher or deposit (refunded with proof of spay/neuter).

Otherwise for a mixed breed puppy you're probably looking at a private rehome...
Someone rehoming a puppy due to a move, allergies, landlord saying no, etc.
Maybe a genuine ''oops litter'' or perhaps a litter by an unclaimed female being helped by a good citizen. In cases like these, personally I would expect a low fee (maybe $50) and if it were me I would probably ask that I pay a vet directly and the funds be used to alter the mom and/or dad. Maybe a donation to a rescue or shelter of the original owners choice. Something like that...
 

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@sullyrules - I believe the OP plans to spay, just later in the puppy's life, and it looks like they would prefer to do an OSS.
 

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Yes, that is wise...it generally good wait until after puberty and when the pup is finished growing, to alter, if one alters at all. Dogs need their hormones to develop their joints and bones properly, not to mention develop their personality. When I lived in Scandinavia, it is actually considered cruel to fix a dog (but then again, there is no overpopulation problem there either).

I got our unfixed 10 week old puppy from Big Dogs Huge Paws rescue. Because the dogs there are extra large/ giant breeds, they know that dogs should not be fixed until older. They are based in Colorado, but I've seen them adopt out to Oregon.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Why is it important for you to have an unaltered puppy?
I would like a puppy and I would like my dog to develop properly and have a properly balanced endocrine system, hence my search for an intact puppy. I would also like to have a female dog. In terms of today's gonadectomy-happy culture, that is very difficult unless buying directly from a breeder... which I'm actually strongly considering at this point. In terms of being a "responsible" pet owner," I will keep my dog from male dogs during her heat and I also plan to have an ovary-sparing spay done on her as a "back up." ... Also, it means not having to worry about the blood or other health concerns that go along with an intact female such as pyometra.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm strongly considering this breeder: Home - Shiba Country - Where Shiba Inus Rule!

It's close to me, so I can go check it out and meet the dogs. When I was previously in contact with the breeder, she said that if I contact them about 6 months before I'm ready for a dog and let them know what I'm interested in, they'll see what they can do in terms of who is ready to breed and what litters they have planned. I tried to see what non-breeder options there are, but I'm getting a bit discouraged... Still have time to find something else though! If I can't find anything reasonable from a non-breeder, I'll likely go with this breeder or an australian shepherd.
 

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I would like a puppy and I would like my dog to develop properly and have a properly balanced endocrine system, hence my search for an intact puppy. I would also like to have a female dog. In terms of today's gonadectomy-happy culture, that is very difficult unless buying directly from a breeder... which I'm actually strongly considering at this point. In terms of being a "responsible" pet owner," I will keep my dog from male dogs during her heat and I also plan to have an ovary-sparing spay done on her as a "back up." ... Also, it means not having to worry about the blood or other health concerns that go along with an intact female such as pyometra.
I'm strongly considering this breeder: Home - Shiba Country - Where Shiba Inus Rule!

It's close to me, so I can go check it out and meet the dogs. When I was previously in contact with the breeder, she said that if I contact them about 6 months before I'm ready for a dog and let them know what I'm interested in, they'll see what they can do in terms of who is ready to breed and what litters they have planned. I tried to see what non-breeder options there are, but I'm getting a bit discouraged... Still have time to find something else though! If I can't find anything reasonable from a non-breeder, I'll likely go with this breeder or an australian shepherd.
There aren't going to be any respectable rescues that will give you an intact female. If you find one that will, run fast in the other direction, something is definitely off about them. While there are risks involved with early spay/neuter, it is nothing compared with millions of dogs being euthanized every year because of accidents, irresponsibility, or indifference.
 

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There aren't going to be any respectable rescues that will give you an intact female. If you find one that will, run fast in the other direction, something is definitely off about them. While there are risks involved with early spay/neuter, it is nothing compared with millions of dogs being euthanized every year because of accidents, irresponsibility, or indifference.
Not entirely true, depends on the age the pups are adopted out. Working in rescues, there are many large breed/ giant breed rescues that don't want someone to alter the dog until it is 6 months old, or sometimes the pup is at least one year. I've seen it in many large breed rescues. The adopter signs a contract saying they will alter the pup by the age of x months (could be 6 months or 1 year old, depending on policy)

Having an altered dog is all about training, management, and not letting your dog just roam. Police dogs are usually left unaltered.
 

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@HelloToYou - Let me preface this by saying I have two, purebred dogs, both from breeders.

I am BEGGING you, not to get a dog from this breeder.
 

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@HelloToYou

This puppy is available for adoption and is not fixed. This is a reputable rescue that I have previously adopted from and sometimes volunteer for. However, do know that they prefer applicants who have previous extra-large dog experience, but I know they have adopted out to people with no big dog experience who pleaded their case. Their application process is very thorough, and this is just one of the things that make the rescue great.

Giggles - Great Dane/Hound Mix Puppy | Big Dogs Huge Paws, Inc

Their official policy is that you must fix the puppy by the age of 6 months and provide proof, but they are somewhat flexible with this if you need an extension (like, up to a year) for the dog to do more growing.
 

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I'm strongly considering this breeder: Home - Shiba Country - Where Shiba Inus Rule!

It's close to me, so I can go check it out and meet the dogs. When I was previously in contact with the breeder, she said that if I contact them about 6 months before I'm ready for a dog and let them know what I'm interested in, they'll see what they can do in terms of who is ready to breed and what litters they have planned. I tried to see what non-breeder options there are, but I'm getting a bit discouraged... Still have time to find something else though! If I can't find anything reasonable from a non-breeder, I'll likely go with this breeder or an australian shepherd.
I have a puppy from what turned out to be a backyard breeder, the litter was left in a laundry with a bit of newspaper strewn around, I suspect they had never been exposed to anywhere else. We were told she was the "calm one", she was horrendously ill with parasites. She has been difficult because she didn't have enough active time with siblings to develop bite inhibition and toilet training has been a bit of a nightmare. She came close to dying less than 24 hours after we brought her home. The vet thinks her poor start left her vulnerable to other issues. She has cost us over $3000 in vet treatments so far.

The site is a little worrying, there are a lot of litters planned at one time and they make no assurances on past health or temperament of their dogs. The thing that concerns me most is that they are particular to note that they take no responsibility for any parasites the puppy comes with. To me this suggests they could have an environment that harbors something, look out for stained covered concrete when you check out the premises because if they don't allow time and UV exposure between litters there is just going to be a never ending cycle of parasites, bleach alone won't clear them out of concrete because it is porous.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
@HelloToYou

This puppy is available for adoption and is not fixed. This is a reputable rescue that I have previously adopted from and sometimes volunteer for. However, do know that they prefer applicants who have previous extra-large dog experience, but I know they have adopted out to people with no big dog experience who pleaded their case. Their application process is very thorough, and this is just one of the things that make the rescue great.

Giggles - Great Dane/Hound Mix Puppy | Big Dogs Huge Paws, Inc

Their official policy is that you must fix the puppy by the age of 6 months and provide proof, but they are somewhat flexible with this if you need an extension (like, up to a year) for the dog to do more growing.
I appreciate the link; however, I'm not interested in extra big dogs.
 
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