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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone!

So, I've been noticing that Heidi is a bit of a resource guarder when it comes to treats (bully sticks) and regular sticks. Not at all with me, but with Levi, and other dogs.

I've started noticing it when our Bark Box came last night and there was a bully stick. I gave it to Levi and gave Heidi the treat dispensing toy stuffed with some treats. Well, Heidi decided she wanted the Bully stick so she went and barked/snapped at Levi. Well, Levi is as far from a RG as it gets, so he instantly drops it, and Heidi picked it up and happily trotted away. I was annoyed, so I asked for her to drop it, which she did, and I gave it back to Levi, who moved further away this time. I put Heidi on leash, and the whole time she was straining and barking to get the stick. Every time she barked, my big baby of an Aussie would drop the stick. In the end I broke it in two pieces so they each got one.

She also does the freeze and snap with certain dogs when we have play dates, but NOT with Levi, he can take a stick and they run around and play and chase with it.

Currently they are both happily chewing on the same large Nylabone. They also share antlers, stuffies, and eat side by side 3 times a day with zero issues.

I'm not sure how to address it, since it seems to be limited to only a few items, should we just avoid Bully Sticks, or is there something I can do to discourage this behaviour?
 

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I know this is probably not the right answer, but I just avoid the things that make Roxie guard. I try to run interference if they do have something they are feeling like guarding, but really I just avoid the treats that cause issue (Raw bones for Roxie)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm thinking we might just forgo the bully sticks. If they can chew on everything else and those are the only problems, well then it's a quick fix. :p
 
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Yea it's SO hard to work on RG between the dogs, IMO. Because you can't control factors like timing and gradually changing thresholds when you can't politely explain to the other dog what you want him/her to do. :p

So I generally just manage chews and food. If it's just a little growling and lip lifting and everyone respects those signals, honestly I don't even care. Pip is my only one who will seriously RG and he is just kept separate for chew time. The youngsters will tell each other to stay away but they all respect each other's signals and there aren't any real problems among them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
@sassafras - Agreed, I think I underestimated the RG between dogs, since they are so happy to drop what they have for me.

Levi quickly picks up on the fact she wants what he has, and quickly leaves her alone. I think he forgets he's much bigger and could take it if he wanted. He's too sweet for his own good sometimes. ;P
 

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I'd just separate them when they have certain treats. *shrug*
 

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I took a different approach with Pax...at the first sign of RG with anything, he instantly lost that item and it was taken away. That is counter intuitive to conventional training as they are fearful that they will lose the item, but Pax was smart enough to learn real fast that any signs of RG were not gonna result in good things for him. He figured it out real fast!
 

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You can train your dog not to take the other dogs toys or treats but if you have a constantly changing supply of toys and treats I'm not sure how to do that.

Maybe draw an imaginary boundary and treats and toys in onside belong to one dog and can't be touched by the other.
 

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I took a different approach with Pax...at the first sign of RG with anything, he instantly lost that item and it was taken away. That is counter intuitive to conventional training as they are fearful that they will lose the item, but Pax was smart enough to learn real fast that any signs of RG were not gonna result in good things for him. He figured it out real fast!
It's not counter intuitive at all actually, it makes perfect sense but there are problems with implementation. I'm not sure if you have two dogs or not, if you do the problem is that it requires you to be there at all times. If you just have one dog, it's not really effective because resource guarding with other dogs is completely different from resource guarding with humans.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So, RG has amped up a little bit, so I could use some more advice. We were at puppy class yesterday, and as soon as another puppy came close while I was giving Heidi treats, she would growl/bark/snap to get them away.

For example, we were working on recalls, and if she came and was sitting, I would feed her, and if another puppy came over to investigate, she would chase him away.

Meh, now I'm nervous about it. Thoughts?
 
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