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Hi there, I'm new here. I'm posing this question here as I just can't seem to find a good enough answer online. I have a 5 year old chocolate labrador and my husband is going on a 26 mile walk/hike in a couple days and wondering if he should take our dog. It's going to be 12 miles of walking & temperatures may be in the 70's or low 80's. He's fairly athletic but as we live in the city it's not often he goes on really long walks but he gets to run off leash every day at the park. My husband recently did a 9 mile run with him and his paw pad was rubbed raw. It's healed now but can that sort of thing happen again from a long walk? My husband is going camping with friends, it'd be really nice if our dog could go with him but I don't want him to if it's going to be too much. What do you think? What would you do?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
That should read 12 HOURS of walking. So 26 miles and will take 12 hours. I think my husband has decided against it though. But I'm still interested in what everyone else would do?
 

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The 9mi run, what sort of surfaces was that on? Pavement/asphalt/gravel? That would explain why his paws became raw. Is the walk/hike on forest trails mostly? I think as long as the majority of it is forest trails, sure why not? And walking would be just fine. I'd do it. But Raider is pretty athletic, and a year and a half, so I don't question.
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Is the trail rocky or gravel covered at all? If it is, I'd skip it. I think I'd only take the dog if he will be on soft ground and if the dog is in good shape.
 

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Plus you can buy little doggie shoes to help protect the paws.

If you do decide to take the dog, make sure you bring lots of water and are able to take breaks for him to regenerate. A Lab is kind of genetically built for travelling long distances... you also might want to call and ask your vet what they'd recommend also.
 

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The answer totally depends on the dog, terrain and weather.

26 miles in a day is not an issue what so ever for a young, fit dog. If the terrain is nor abrasive or rough, not a big deal. Weather is a factor, so you have to consider water supply and availability, depending on temp. The dog is likely to be running around as the owner hikes, so they are likely to cover more distance than the person and require more water than when they are just walking, unless the dog is leashed.

My dog will have frequent days where he'll cover 25+ miles in a day without an issue. On those days, I up his food intake slightly as well, to provide the needed nutrients and calories.
 

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My dog (GSD/Husky mix) is not much of a long distance athlete. We recently run 6.2 miles (temps in the 80s), but that was the furthest she ever went.
Currently I can not see her do much more.

However when the winter comes we will see...

I might need to get her shoes though, as she prefers to walk on concrete over the grass surface.
 

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Just like a human, the dog needs to build up stamina. You should monitor closely and I would get nervous of any dog with medium hair being that active for that long in the 80s.

If you continue to run or walk your dog this much, I would look into musher's secret. I don't do 12 miles a day with my dog, but I still use it to protect his paws for bike rides, runs, and long walks.
 
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