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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How does this sound for 9 week puppy. It is based on it being a work day and she will come with me to my office. Side note, without moving things around the crate will only fit in front of my desk where she can hear but not see me. Is that ok?

630 wake and out
645 play
700 feed with food ball
715 out
730 half hour car ride to work
800 out then crate
Then out every 1.5 hours or less depending on her as an individual. Ill be taking a week off then I get her and writhing all pottys down so ill know.
1200 out then play
1230 feed with bowl in work crate
1245 out then crate
Out as often as necessary like earlier
530 out then play
600 car for half hour
630 out then free time in kitchen
700 hand feed supper, drink then water comes up
715 out
Out as often as needed, training, resting, play (all about her!)
1015 last out
1030 bed ( crate in room)

The just outs will be all business , apart from the praise. I work only 4 days a week, and the other days I want to follow sane schedule but hopefully I can play with her now instead of crate time , unless you think that would make it a hard change? Also when old enough I will walk her half hour in the morning, lunch, and evening.
 

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Lol good luck keeping on that

I try to remain structured and I spend more time with Cosmo than the average person would with their dog, but that's an extremely structured life, down to the very last minute. I would think it would be extremely hard to maintain that kind of schedule. It is cool that you can bring her to work, I had a job that I could bring Cosmo and it worked very well for us.

Remember as well: dogs need alone time too. You can cause a lot of anxiety (SA) if you're constantly with your dog and one day inevitably need to not be. My uncle has a Pom who will scream at the top of his lungs for literally HOURS because he's so stressed out. He paces, screams, tries to find a way out of the car or house he's left in, and once escaped and almost got hit by a car trying to find him.
 

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uhm~
would be too strict with me and too complicated for me. I'm generally not good at following schedules though.
with our dogs, when they were puppies, the day usually looked like this:
6:30-7:30: wake up and a quick walk of 15 minutes outside, afterwards food
7:30-15:00: dog follows who ever is there through the house. sometimes there playtime or short training session (2 minutes), mostly he's okay with just being together and getting cuddles from time to time. When he's tired he goes to sleep, when he's being annoying he gets send to his blanket.
around every two hours we send him in the garden.
15:-16:30: outside time. depending on the age this included a longer or short walk as well as meeting some of the dogs in the neighbourhood and learning new things like "being quiet in a café", "being nice in the bus" or simple tricks...sometimes we also just sat there and watched passbybers, training to be relaxed around strangers.
16:30-22:00 the Dog is with the family, when he annoying he's send away, when he's nice and calm, he gets cuddles or some family members do trick with him. during mealtime it has to stay on its blanket, around every 2 hours he gets send in the garden.
22:00: usually the time when it gets quiet in the house. He has another 15 minutes walk before going to bed. the first weeks they sleep in the bedroom so that you can hear when he's getting nervous. in the first week we had the alarm set for walks every 2 hours, but after ca. a week we started stretching the time first to three hours and then to once the night. Both didn't need a night walk after around a month with the family. Teo was a bit faster.

Relatively fast, they didn't need the inbetween walks anymore and after stretching the time, both were okay with their three walks, every day. in the morning and evening ~15 minutes and in in the afternoon for around 1,5-2 hours.
With Teo I was the afternoon walker and my dad had training walks with him in the morning ans evening. Sancho gets walked everyday by a different family members depending on working and school/uni times.
training session during the day are mostly really short and spontanious...just 1-2 minutes, but there are few every family member is doing during the day.
The dogs had both problems with staying alone in the house at first, but after a few months training and carefully stretching the time, they got used to it, Sancho can stay alone for ca. 4-6 hours now, which is the maximum time to left alone recommended by the animal welfare...they need to go potty after all. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Lol good luck keeping on that

I try to remain structured and I spend more time with Cosmo than the average person would with their dog, but that's an extremely structured life, down to the very last minute. I would think it would be extremely hard to maintain that kind of schedule. It is cool that you can bring her to work, I had a job that I could bring Cosmo and it worked very well for us.

Remember as well: dogs need alone time too. You can cause a lot of anxiety (SA) if you're constantly with your dog and one day inevitably need to not be. My uncle has a Pom who will scream at the top of his lungs for literally HOURS because he's so stressed out. He paces, screams, tries to find a way out of the car or house he's left in, and once escaped and almost got hit by a car trying to find him.
I plan to keep the meals 100% on schedule to help with house training but the rest is likely more rough than anything and will also depend a lot on her. And yes, in the long run I do plan to leave her at home but until she is old enough to hold it till lunch I will bring her to work. I only work 4 days a week, and the other ones in the time that she would normally be crated at work I will work on crate games and training. Slowly leaving for small times that get longer. Also I'm in and out of my office all day because I manage the attached business. I'm going to spend the week off on the crate too , so that she has the best shot of being ok with her crate.
 

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puppy raising is not rocket science.
they need to eat, drink, sleep, do their business and learn that their human is awesome.
don't overstress and plan too much, wait 'til the puppy is there and then look how you can fit both of your needs together.

But don't expect your puppy to have read some kind of "how to bring up your puppy perfectly"-book.
don't expect anything for the first weeks and be happy about every little step they make towards doggy-adulthood ...especially don't expect it will be okay to be in the crate for hours after one week. ;)
 
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Puppies have their own agenda and often scupper our plans, but it’s a good idea to have a framework to work to.

There are a few of things that caught my eye

1) Rigid feeding schedule, I prefer to be flexible so that my dogs become flexible. If your dog gets used to being fed the dot, so to speak, what happens when you are late coming home? Your dog might get stressed, howl the place down, rearrange the kitchen etc. My friends Great Dane cross will scream if her food is not given precisely at 5 o’clock. She’ll pick up her dish and try to take it to her owners, banging against door frames and furniture, if the dish isn’t on the floor, she’ll pick up her water bowl and carry it to her owners, spilling the water everywhere, she will jump at them and pull their clothing until she gets her food. Not a behaviour I would tolerate in my dogs

2) I have been indoctrinated :D to feed young puppies four meals a day at a very young age, you only mention 3

3) 6 hours is, in my opinion, and experience, too long for a young puppy to go without a toilet break in the night, which brings me to the item below, the one that concerns me most

4) 700 hand feed supper, drink, then water comes up. What do you mean? Is your puppy not going to have access to water after 7 o’clock? Until what time? What will you feed? Judging by the statement that you will feed by hand I assume you will feed dry dog food. Why would you stop your puppy drinking when her body tells her to drink? Is it so that you don’t have to get up in the night? Are you aware that stopping your puppy drinking could cause health issues? Puppyhood lasts a few months, her health problems could last a lifetime. Can you think back to when you were last really, really thirsty? Horrible, wasn’t it? Do you want your puppy to suffer like that? I’m sure, there are people who withdraw water from dogs without ill effects, personally, I wouldn’t risk it. I hope I misunderstood your intentions, if I haven’t, please reconsider.

In the UK the Animal Welfare Act 2006 states that animals need fresh drinking water at all times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Puppies have their own agenda and often scupper our plans, but it’s a good idea to have a framework to work to.

There are a few of things that caught my eye

1) Rigid feeding schedule, I prefer to be flexible so that my dogs become flexible. If your dog gets used to being fed the dot, so to speak, what happens when you are late coming home? Your dog might get stressed, howl the place down, rearrange the kitchen etc. My friends Great Dane cross will scream if her food is not given precisely at 5 o’clock. She’ll pick up her dish and try to take it to her owners, banging against door frames and furniture, if the dish isn’t on the floor, she’ll pick up her water bowl and carry it to her owners, spilling the water everywhere, she will jump at them and pull their clothing until she gets her food. Not a behaviour I would tolerate in my dogs

2) I have been indoctrinated :D to feed young puppies four meals a day at a very young age, you only mention 3

3) 6 hours is, in my opinion, and experience, too long for a young puppy to go without a toilet break in the night, which brings me to the item below, the one that concerns me most

4) 700 hand feed supper, drink, then water comes up. What do you mean? Is your puppy not going to have access to water after 7 o’clock? Until what time? What will you feed? Judging by the statement that you will feed by hand I assume you will feed dry dog food. Why would you stop your puppy drinking when her body tells her to drink? Is it so that you don’t have to get up in the night? Are you aware that stopping your puppy drinking could cause health issues? Puppyhood lasts a few months, her health problems could last a lifetime. Can you think back to when you were last really, really thirsty? Horrible, wasn’t it? Do you want your puppy to suffer like that? I’m sure, there are people who withdraw water from dogs without ill effects, personally, I wouldn’t risk it. I hope I misunderstood your intentions, if I haven’t, please reconsider.

In the UK the Animal Welfare Act 2006 states that animals need fresh drinking water at all times.
If she wants out at night I will not be ignoring her. She will be beside my bed so I can hear if she is wake. I am a very light sleeper.
Every place I have read on the internet has said to pull up the water at 7 or 8 pm, and I will be letting her drink what she needs during and after supper. Will be taking it up when she is done with it around 715 or 30 depending , I wrote it after that as its an approx time. As other have mentioned, it would not be easy to be strict on the schedule, its mostly a rough idea.
I will have to look into meals, I assumed it was three as I had saw it mentioned but I have no researched it enough to be confident.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That being said one thing I was wondering about when I posted this was weather to push supper back to 8 or not , which would push back wafter too.
 

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That being said one thing I was wondering about when I posted this was weather to push supper back to 8 or not , which would push back wafter too.
just leave your bedroom door open, so that the dog can go drink water if it wants to. :)
or have a water bowl in your bedroom.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
She is crate training, in crate training literature it says don t provide water at night or they will have accidents in crate which is counter productive to house training. She won't be loose at night.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Have you considered pet insurance for your puppy?
Not needed, if she needs medical attention I have a large emergency fund account for such an occasion.

Also the vet and my positive reinforcement trainer both are happy with crate training. The vet first recommended it and the trainer, who works at a vet as her day job, told me to pick up water with out me asking.
 

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Not needed, if she needs medical attention I have a large emergency fund account for such an occasion.

Also the vet and my positive reinforcement trainer both are happy with crate training. The vet first recommended it and the trainer, who works at a vet as her day job, told me to pick up water with out me asking.
i still don't get why'd you want all that planned out before even knowing how the dog will be like when it's at home and make several threads about it?
why don't you just wait until the dog is there, before you plan all these rules and schedules? You'll probably have to change the plans anyway to fit the need of your dog.
Don't get me wrong, a bit of planning is necessary when you want to give a new dog a home, but you need to stay flexible enough to change everything if you notice the plan doesn't fit your pet.
Everything seems so strictly reglemented...raising is a puppy is meant to be tiring, annoying, involving and fun, not like doing your taxes.
It also takes a bit of the "honeymoon"-charme of the first weeks away in my opinion. ;)

Regardless of all that, depriving an animal of water isn't very nice in my opinion. Especially as long as it's still growing.
 

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I have a bit of a different take on this thread than many of the DF regulars who are posting here. I think it's GREAT, AWESOME, FANTASTIC that dreamraidder is doing research, asking questions, and making plans before bringing home a puppy. :thumbsup:

Yes, of course, that initial schedule is a bit too rigid, and I'm sure that dreamraidder will adjust it a few times down the road, with the help of his/her trainer and vet. Maybe we can all ease up a bit on the criticism and encourage more questions. I like to think that this forum is indeed a welcoming, friendly forum for all dog owners, both experienced, and more importantly, novice. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have a bit of a different take on this thread than many of the DF regulars who are posting here. I think it's GREAT, AWESOME, FANTASTIC that dreamraidder is doing research, asking questions, and making plans before bringing home a puppy. :thumbsup:

Yes, of course, that initial schedule is a bit too rigid, and I'm sure that dreamraidder will adjust it a few times down the road, with the help of his/her trainer and vet. Maybe we can all ease up a bit on the criticism and encourage more questions. I like to think that this forum is indeed a welcoming, friendly forum for all dog owners, both experienced, and more importantly, novice. :)
Yes, I hope to learn what I can ahead of time and I fully expect to be changing and adapting! I'm sure she will keep me on my toes :)
 
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