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Hello everyone, I signed up to this forum because I am planning to get a dog for my family. Ever since I was a kid, my dream was to be a good family man and a good family isn't complete with out a dog.

However, I lived most of my life in the Philippines (the dogs i grew up with are Pitbulls and Dobermans) and it's easy to raise dogs in the Philippines because most people here have servants/maids (ranging around 3-4). Whenever we go to work, our servants are there so the dogs have someone watch over them, play with them, help along with the training, feed them, walk them when we can't, and just make sure they don't run out or destroy things in doors. But this is in the Philippines.

Now, I live in the New York City: I'm married, I work as a graphic designer and my wife is a Doctor of Internal Medicine. We have 2 kids, the eldest being 8 and the youngest being 6 and we now live in Riverdale - the Bronx. We've been living here for about two years now and we want a dog to complete us.

It's just I'm trying to figure out how to raise it. It seems so difficult here in the US. because unlike the Philippines, when we don't have any servants at home. My wife and I work through out the weekdays and my kids obviously go to school thus leaving the house fully unattended. So this brings me here asking advice.

How do you guys deal with this?
Do you just leave your dog alone at home alone while you work, what if your dog is a medium-large dog?


By the way, the desired dog i have is an American Pitbull but Labradors, a Boxer, and a Doberman are candidates.
 

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How the dog is raised and kept really depends on the owner. I'm disabled so I have the luxury of staying at home with my dog, back when I worked by dogs got a walk in the mornings then were by their selves anywhere from 8 to 9 hours 5 days a week, on my off days we'd go walking or to the dog park.

People who work and make enough money sometimes hire a dog walker to come take the dog out once or twice during the day while they work, others opt to send their dog to doggy day care.

Some people hire trainers to help them train the dog, others may go to a training class, and some like myself tend to watch youtube trainers like Kikopup.

My advice if you have to leave the dog alone and do not wish to either hire a dog walker, or send the dog to doggy daycare, while you work is to get a grown dog around 1 to 3 years of age or older so that it's more. Doing that the dog will be able to hold it's bladder and need less hands on attention then a puppy, you'll also skip the sleepless nights. If you want to get a puppy then be prepared to take it out to potty at least once during the night, be prepared for it to cry during the night for at least a few nights as it adjust, and make sure you constantly supervise it when you give it some freedom or it might chew something you do not want chewed or have an accident that you don't discover till hours later. Also you cannot leave a small puppy alone for 8 hours, like you can an adult dog, and not have it have at least one accident so your best bets are to come home on your lunch break, hire a dog walker, send it to puppy daycare, or use an exercise pen and set up an area where it can potty in one spot and sleep in another.

Good luck to you!
 
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uhm~ you know that most people in the Phillippines probably have no servants to care for their dogs? because a major part of the servants that care for houses and dogs there are inhabitants of the Phillipines too and these people probably don't have the money to employ people to play with their fiffy. ;)

I'm not American, so i can't tell you much about raising and having dogs...but I'm sure a big city like New York has a lot of service companies to care for, walk or supervise dogs while the owners are at work. You just have to be willing to take a few coins in your hand...like everywhere. just in some regions there's more money involved.

Without a service person, I think it depends on how much time you spend outside the house and on the kind of dog you've got.
i personally wouldn't recommend a working dog if you didn't train a dog before. training and exercising a Dobermann needs a good portion of discipline (i.e. disciplining yourself) and dedication.
Boxer, Pittie and labs are all very active dogs, that needs a lot of exercise. I don't know you and your family, but do you have enough time to spend several hours a day to exercise and train such a dog?
I think one of the smaller, calmer companion breeds could perhaps be a better fit. Or try to find an adult animal that can deal with being alone for a certain time every day.
You still have to be willing to walk, exercise and train your dog every day, or pay a person to do so.

I personally think ,a dog shouldn be without human interaction for too long...I wouldn't want my dog to be alone for longer than 4-5 hours, but this is just my personal opinion and it also depends on the the quality time you spend with your dog and the dog itself.
If you walk, train and exercise your dog every morningbe fore you go to work for a few hours it is very likely that dog will just be asleep until you come home, when it's used to it.
 
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Our dog is 55lbs. I wasn't working for the first 10 months that we had her. She can be left home alone for a pretty long time but I prefer not to, so I pay someone to take her out all day. It costs $30 a day. We are in the nyc area too, there are plenty of walkers/doggie daycares. You can expect to pay 15 for a walk in the middle of the day and around 30 for all day daycare (most places offer package deals for regular care my one charges 40 if it's less than 3 times a week).
Most places offer Training classes on the weekend, and as long as you have some time to train and interact, it should be ok.
 

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As an owner of a boxer/pit/lab mix, I'd recommend consider other breeds if you are in an urban area without access to a large, safely fenced yard and the ability to provide the dog with some seriously intense exercise. I live on 7.5 acres in the country, and I still have a hard time dealing with Winston's abundant energy. My property is somewhat fenced, but he could get out if he wanted to badly enough, so he is shut up in a room in my horse barn while I'm at work (with his Aussie "brother" who is fine with this routine). That's at least 8 hours a day that he's in a fairly large room with a nice bed, big bucket of water, a companion, and some toys and items he can chew. He still comes out of that room raring to go and play every day, and wakes up every morning (at 5am) ready to play as well. His only 1.5 years old now, so I'm hopeful his energy level will subside a little as he ages, but he's without a doubt the most energetic dog I've ever owned. I also cannot leave him in the house unattended else he will destroy it. He's already chewed my door frame at the front door, a place in the wall near a window, couch cushions, and my mattress. I think separation anxiety is probably to blame, though sometimes he's done fine and hasn't destroyed things, so it could just be that he has too much energy and his only release is chewing/destroying. I'm not sure. I've bought him a crate and am slowly introducing him to it in the hopes that I can put him in it at least for times that I'm not gone all day (running to the store, out to eat, whatever). It gets very cold and very hot out in the room in the barn (not dangerously so, but still not ideal), so I'd rather have the dogs in the house nice and comfy.
I've never never found raising a dog (in America) challenging at all before this particular dog. The others were more self-sufficient, it seemed like, and stayed outside more unattended because they weren't prone to wandering off property. Winston is very athletic, intelligent, and intense, and he requires a whole new level of management on my part. I would guess that's the combination of breeds involved in his make-up, but it might also just be his individual personality. I've had labs and lab-mixes before and never had much trouble with them. My Aussie has always been a saint. But Winston? He's something else! He's a great dog though, so all the effort to keep him safe and healthy is worth it, but it definitely is much like having a young child to care for. So dependent, and SO. MUCH. ENERGY. He has to chase his frisbee for at least 30 minutes a day just to be half-way sane, and that's even after he's out with me taking care of the horses (morning and night) and chasing the neighbors down a quarter mile of pasture fence line a couple times a day. He's still always on "ready!" mode!
Choose your dog carefully. That's the moral of my story. LOL.
 

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My dad's family is from the Philippines so I know what you mean about having people who can take care of the dog.

Do you live in a house or an apartment?

Generally dogs are fine being at home all day as long as they get plenty of exercise when you guys are home.

A dog walking service is not a bad idea, if you look you can find one with bonded employees and positive reviews. You can then give them a key to your garage or if in an apartment have your doorman bring the dog out and they can take it for walks.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
uhm~ you know that most people in the Phillippines probably have no servants to care for their dogs? because a major part of the servants that care for houses and dogs there are inhabitants of the Phillipines too and these people probably don't have the money to employ people to play with their fiffy. ;)

:D But they do stay at home all day and for only $50-$100 a month they will cook, clean, laundry and babysit your kids+pets. Good thing America isn't that spoiled, to be honest, my kids never cleaned their room until we moved here.

As for the day cares and all that, I am looking into, but they are costly.

--

For the person asking if i live in a house or an apartment. I live in a single family home... regardless of it being in NYC, the neighborhood is a beautiful suburb.
 

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Just a suggestion, maybe you should rethink the breeds you're interested in. They're both high energy breeds which require a bit more exercise and commitment than a low energy breed.

Exhibit A, image left:

ADHD affected high energy, high drive dog. Must chase tenis ball for hours or is likely to substitute a prized possession for said tenis ball

On the right we have Exhibit B, the worlds largest couch potato. Will not chase a tenis ball if covered in peanut butter. Favorite activity: taking naps. Can be left alone in a room full of china with no problem.
 

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I agree, energy is a big consideration. Our dog is mid energy, she can go for a long walk, and she does need some exercise, but if she doesn't get a long walk on a particular day it is not the end of the world.

With that said, I chose daycare because if I am too tired when I get in from work to walk her it is not a big issue as she has already been exercising most of the day.

Sounds like you need a lazy dog!
 

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Well, first of all you need to see if where you're living allows your desired breeds. I work in a shelter in NYC and MANY Pit Bulls and other large breeds get surrendered because Pit Bulls and large dogs are not allowed in many apartment complexes or even neighborhoods. But if you feel you are dog-savvy enough, getting a Pit Bull would be excellent. I work in an animal shelter in NYC and Pit Bulls are the most common breed we have and last adopted, so we love it when people seek them out! I disagree with the person who said you definitely need a smaller breed, because there are many large breed dogs who live happily in NYC when given the proper exercise and attention.

I would recommend getting an adult dog, because your family doesn't have time for a puppy. Since you come from a family having lots of servants and what not I will assume you have some money. It would be good to hire a dog walker to walk your dog while you're at work. Some people also put their dogs into daycare, or just hire someone to spend an hour or two with them. This is typically sufficient to keep them happy. Also, you should find a training class or dog trainer who can help you train your dog as well. If you want to feel free to message me as I am familiar with not only available dogs in the area, but dog trainers, daycares and other resources.
 

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:D But they do stay at home all day and for only $50-$100 a month they will cook, clean, laundry and babysit your kids+pets. Good thing America isn't that spoiled, to be honest, my kids never cleaned their room until we moved here.
Maybe.....just maybe.....paying poverty wages to your help is not a point to brag about.

When I was younger, I participated in a summer-long, home stay program in the Philippines. I lived with a wealthy family in a gated community in Metro-Manila. Because all of the family members were busy at work or at school, I mostly spent my days alone in their palatial home. I ended up getting to know the family's servants quite well, those servants who made the equivalent of $50-$100 a month.

The servants in that home weren't badly treated, but they spent most of their lives living apart from their families who resided in the provinces or in the Middle East. The family's driver only saw his wife and three children once a year and slept on a reclining lawn chair with a rolled up jacket for his pillow. The family had given him a t-shirt for Christmas! The maid who spoke the most English had attended college for two years with the hopes of becoming a teacher, but she had to quit to support her ailing mother and other family members, also in the provinces. She would never be able to fulfill her dreams, not at the equivalent of $50-100 a month cleaning up after that family.

Unlike the family's spoiled children, I couldn't close my eyes to the impoverished conditions around me or take for granted anymore the privilege of my own fortunate birth to a middle-class American family. This had a profound effect on my choice of a college major and my profession.

Good luck on finding a dog that works for your family, and I wouldn't have written all this had you just mentioned that you were from the Philippines or even that you had servants there. But, maybe you can be more sensitive in boasting about your privilege and your ability to pay poverty-level wages to your servants.
 

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@SusanLynn

The fact that in America the reality of the world is comfortable tucked away from your eyes doesn't mean that that reality isn't present in every cup of coffee you drink, mango you eat, or clothes you put on, from the 5 dollar t-shirt you wear to the 100 acid washed jeans.
 

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@SusanLynn

The fact that in America the reality of the world is comfortable tucked away from your eyes doesn't mean that that reality isn't present in every cup of coffee you drink, mango you eat, or clothes you put on, from the 5 dollar t-shirt you wear to the 100 acid washed jeans.
Esand - I'm really quite aware of that. My experiences in the Philippines led me to major in economics as an university student with an emphasis on economic development. I spent another year living in Central America as well as several more in East Asia. Now, I teach ESL to immigrants in the heart of Los Angeles. My students hail from all parts of the world and from all socio-economic backgrounds. I know that I'm very privileged.
 

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Well, to get back to the subject of dogs, I'd like to suggest that you consider adopting a two to four year old from a rescue group that fosters dogs in home settings. Besides breed, two very important considerations are: a) energy level and b) separation anxiety.

My dog is a shelter dog, but shelter dogs come with lots of unknowns. Although rescue groups can sometimes seem a bit overly picky with home visits and lots of questions, I think you'd benefit from working with a group that has fosters their dogs in family homes and can tell you about the personalities, habits, needs, and quirks of the dogs you're considering.
 

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I think it depends on the commitment you put into the dog. I know of a Great Dane that lives in a high rise apartment in Calgary and is perfectly happy. His owner has a dog walker, he goes to daycare on some days and his owner dotes on him constantly.

My own personal dog lives in a small house with a backyard with me and my mom (she has medical needs that requires she lives with someone but is independent enough to not need a full time home worker, so we're mother-daughter roomies :)).

Tessa is a 32 kg lab/bc/aussie? mix, she stays in my room when I'm at work. I work 8 hours a day, but come home at lunch so she's only home 4 hours and 4 hours. I have very little social life that doesn't involve my dog, and if I'm unable to take her out I have a cheap dog walker in my neighbour's 14 year old. We are always outside or doing something. If it's not hiking in the coulees, then we're at a family friend acreage working on their sheep, or playing off leash in the field with their border collies (code name: the posse). My mom works part time at a job to keep herself busy on some days, so some days Tessa has her at home all day and some days it's the 4 and 4 day.

I'm sure she'd be very happy if I was home, or her "nana" was at home, all day every day, but she's quite happy the way it is. So long as you take care of your dogs exercise needs, mental requirements, training needs, and companion needs then you'll have a happy, healthy dog.
 

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Maybe.....just maybe.....paying poverty wages to your help is not a point to brag about.

When I was younger, I participated in a summer-long, home stay program in the Philippines. I lived with a wealthy family in a gated community in Metro-Manila. Because all of the family members were busy at work or at school, I mostly spent my days alone in their palatial home. I ended up getting to know the family's servants quite well, those servants who made the equivalent of $50-$100 a month.

The servants in that home weren't badly treated, but they spent most of their lives living apart from their families who resided in the provinces or in the Middle East. The family's driver only saw his wife and three children once a year and slept on a reclining lawn chair with a rolled up jacket for his pillow. The family had given him a t-shirt for Christmas! The maid who spoke the most English had attended college for two years with the hopes of becoming a teacher, but she had to quit to support her ailing mother and other family members, also in the provinces. She would never be able to fulfill her dreams, not at the equivalent of $50-100 a month cleaning up after that family.

Unlike the family's spoiled children, I couldn't close my eyes to the impoverished conditions around me or take for granted anymore the privilege of my own fortunate birth to a middle-class American family. This had a profound effect on my choice of a college major and my profession.

Good luck on finding a dog that works for your family, and I wouldn't have written all this had you just mentioned that you were from the Philippines or even that you had servants there. But, maybe you can be more sensitive in boasting about your privilege and your ability to pay poverty-level wages to your servants.
If you knew how things are in the Philippines and how different the value of dollars are to Pesos, you wouldn't see anything wrong with. I see kids here getting paid about $ 1,000 a month which is WAY more than any kid their age in the Philippines who is working even a good entry level job like 100,000. Not even 5+ year professionals make 100,000+ a month.
 

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Well, first of all you need to see if where you're living allows your desired breeds. I work in a shelter in NYC and MANY Pit Bulls and other large breeds get surrendered because Pit Bulls and large dogs are not allowed in many apartment complexes or even neighborhoods. But if you feel you are dog-savvy enough, getting a Pit Bull would be excellent. I work in an animal shelter in NYC and Pit Bulls are the most common breed we have and last adopted, so we love it when people seek them out! I disagree with the person who said you definitely need a smaller breed, because there are many large breed dogs who live happily in NYC when given the proper exercise and attention.

I would recommend getting an adult dog, because your family doesn't have time for a puppy. Since you come from a family having lots of servants and what not I will assume you have some money. It would be good to hire a dog walker to walk your dog while you're at work. Some people also put their dogs into daycare, or just hire someone to spend an hour or two with them. This is typically sufficient to keep them happy. Also, you should find a training class or dog trainer who can help you train your dog as well. If you want to feel free to message me as I am familiar with not only available dogs in the area, but dog trainers, daycares and other resources.
I'm not so sure about Adult dogs, especially with breeds such as Pitbulls.. i want my kids to grow well with the dog and vise versa. I want the dog to stay long in the family. I'm thinking of day care that can handle a puppy but i'm having difficulty finding on that is on the way to work (like a good place in the bronx because i usually take the subways to Manhattan).

Do you guys have any other mid-size breeds in mind? How about a Cur?
 

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If you knew how things are in the Philippines and how different the value of dollars are to Pesos, you wouldn't see anything wrong with. I see kids here getting paid about $ 1,000 a month which is WAY more than any kid their age in the Philippines who is working even a good entry level job like 100,000. Not even 5+ year professionals make 100,000+ a month.
We can certainly agree that the spending power of a dollar in the U.S. compared to the Philippines cannot be compared, and I realize that many servants in the Philippines receive room and board as part of their wages. However, a $50 to $100 monthly salary is still considered poverty level if you're trying to support a family on it.

Latest Statistics on Philippine Poverty - The Borgen Project

Having lived in various countries, I don't begrudge that you had servants, and for someone who needs to support his or her family, it's certainly better to be a servant than to be homeless and starving. However, the way you presented your lifestyle there reminded me greatly of the servants my host family had. They were good, kind people, and it pained me to know that they would always live with dreams deferred because they could never hope for more than $50-100 a month. I don't know you or your family, and clearly, as Esand points out, we have all benefited from the circumstances of our birth. I, too, have been fortunate.

Anyways, enough said. I hope that we can go back to finding the perfect dog for your family.
 

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I'm not so sure about Adult dogs, especially with breeds such as Pitbulls.. i want my kids to grow well with the dog and vise versa. I want the dog to stay long in the family. I'm thinking of day care that can handle a puppy but i'm having difficulty finding on that is on the way to work (like a good place in the bronx because i usually take the subways to Manhattan).

Do you guys have any other mid-size breeds in mind? How about a Cur?

Please consider carefully before deciding to get a puppy, they are a lot of hands on work, need tons of supervision, and need to be taken out every 30 min to an hour when they are awake to avoid potty accidents for at least the first 2 or so months of ownership (depends on how old they are when the owner brings the puppy home). There is also a reason we say that some are cute furry little landsharks cleverly disguised as a puppy, some are very nippy and require a huge amount of training to convince that humans are not overly large chew toys. Teething and a need to chew on whatever is within reach can also be a real problem. I truly think that puppies are cute as a defense mechanism, if they weren't owners would likely be abandoning them left and right. Are you and your family ready to take on all of that?

Out of my 3 dogs I only had one from the time he was a puppy. That was Shadow and he was a brat as a puppy. It took me 8 months to housetrain him, he had his picture by hyper in the dictionary, I had people tell me that I should give him valium to slow him down, he had 0 bite control and I had the bruises to prove it, I had him for 17 years and 8 months. Jersey I adopted when she was around 2 or 3 years old. She was a dream to own, she only had 1 accident in the house, was settled when I got her, never destroyed my stuff, she LOVED kids and had me wanting to adopt a couple for her. I had her for 10 years. Zody is my current dog, I got him when he was a year and 2 months and have had him for nearly 2 years (where'd the time go????) He was also settled when I got him, has never destroyed my stuff and the only time he's had potty accidents was when he was sick. Yes I sometimes wonder what it would have been like to have watched Jersey and Zody grow up, to have had their puppy pictures. I wonder if Zody would be as people aggressive had I had a chance to properly socialize him. That's fleeting though, I just go read these two forums Puppy Help , Housetraining and I'm reminded of why I do not do puppies, but stick to dogs 1 year and older :p
 
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Ugh, forgot that you asked about breeds...

How active are you and your family?
How much training and how much exercise can you honestly give the dog? Letting the dog run about by itself in the backyard does not count as exercise.
How much grooming are you willing to do?
Any breed restrictions in either your home owners insurance if you own the house or on your lease if you are renting?
What's the weight range you are wanting?
 
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