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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just looking for advice from others on how you punish your dog. My baby has been PERFECT but lately she thinks she is in control and has been a lil hard headed and not listening (doesn't get off couch when I tell her, doesn't go to her bed when I tell her, not coming inside when I call her). I've been putting her in her cage when she doesn't listen but she doesn't seem to care. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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I don't. I teach what I want them to know, reward good choices, and manage so that the bad stuff doesn't happen (very often at least).

I've actually found that even verbal punishment can cause a bit of a shutdown that comes across as stubbornness. My dad was always a fan of scolding our terrier mix and her "stubborn" behavior just got worse - but really she's just confused and nervous to even try. I'm working on building her confidence back up.

For your dog, try reteaching the commands and reward heavily for awhile. How old is she?
 

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I'm also curious how old your dog is - sounds like teenage behavior!

I really really try not to even give verbal corrections. One of my favourite trainers says that if your dog keeps making mistakes it is showing you where your training has failed. If my dog fails twice in a row I know I've pushed far beyond what he knows, or there is something different about the training aspect that is confusing him.
 

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I don't.

It's not productive. I reward her when she does things that I want her to do and ignore the bad things until they go away.

Dog wants to pull on the leash? Okay, but our walk won't continue until you can walk nicely. I don't yell or pull on her. I stand completely still until she comes back to me.

Dog wants to jump on people? Okay, but you won't get any pets, treats or playing until you stop.

Dog won't get off of the couch? She probably doesn't know the command "off" yet. Teach her the command and reward heavily when she complies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
She's 2. I guess I just expect too much from her because overall she really is PERFECT and a very chill dog. She's not destructive or aggressive its just "her wanting to do what she wants to do"
 

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I don't. Dogs are never wrong, they are merely reflecting back to us our feelings and emotions, and their "problems" are a great way to examine our denied feelings and emotions and work on those.

For example, there are certain people who I feel I don't want to be judged lacking by, and they make me nervous to be around. My dog picks up on this and always acts jerky around them. I know to fix that kind of behavior I need to address my fears around being judged. My dog is not behaving badly, just tuning into my feelings and emotions and acting on them in a way I am not able to do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you everyone for the advice. I guess I have been approaching this the wrong way. I'm so used to seeing people verbally scowl their dog and I've even seen a few get hit with a newspaper. I didn't realize that "yelling" at her could actually do more bad than good. Thank you guys again!!!
 
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How much damage "punishment" does depends on the dog. I've used punishment in the past before I knew any better and the training class I took encouraged it, yelling, leash pops, swatting, and luckily my dog at the time had a hard temperament so it didn't do any real damage, BUT it really didn't do any good either, he did not learn what to do, and the behavior I was trying to correct always came back.

My dog now would likely completely shut down with punishment, it would also likely teach him to fear me when I worked my butt off to build a relationship with him, and luckily before I got him I had found this found this forum. With him I redirect from what he's not supposed to do. I work to teach him what he should do and proof the commands by training them everywhere. I've learned to use treats appropriately so I haven't wound up with a dog that will only obey if he sees a treat. If he's not obeying commands I try and figure out why, is he overwhelmed, does he know what I'm trying to get him to do, is there to many distraction are some questions I ask myself.

The one thing I do with him is make sure bad behavior is not rewarded. That means I manage things as much as possible so that he is not rewarded, on walks if he pulls I do not let him move forward. If he decides to sit in the window and bark at everyone I will close the blinds, if he keeps it up I'll remove him from the room with the window, I do not holler at him or anything when I do so. Stuff like that is the extent of how I correct bad behavior.
 

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Old habits can be hard to break. I also grew up with teaching dogs through force and punishments. My two boys were taught that way in the beginning. But after I got them I did research and found other, better ways to train. I've been training Freyja without forcing. She is learning quickly and is mostly good. The worse I do is ignore her if she is acting up, sometimes I have to remove her or Vegas when she starts jumping on him. Just keep working on training, if she isn't listening it's likely she doesn't know what you want of her.
 
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I'm more concerned about this thread having read your other one than I would have been about either on its own.

Time outs, or putting her in her cage, are almost completely ineffective as punishment. A verbal "no" is far more effective since it can be timed more accurately.
 

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I would go back and work on reinforcing the behaviors you want. Turn what you want her to do into something SHE wants to do, and then you'll both be on the same page.
 

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I would not put her in her crate for bad behavior. It teaches her that it's a place to dread, and I think a crate should be more of a safe haven.

If she doesn't want to get off the couch when you tell her, make her. She probably isn't getting off the couch because she doesn't feel like she has to. Don't hurt her or be too forceful, just let her know that she has to listen to you every time.
 

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Dogs won't even associate being put in a crate as punishment for the behavior they did 30 seconds ago. There's no point. Even if you scold them during the bad behavior, they will start seeing you as an evil thing. Then your dog really won't want to come to you when called. Go back and relearn the behavior. Dogs don't generalize well. If you teach them to come in one place, on the side of the house next to the blue car, they might understand, but you will still have to teach them the come command outside in front of the house, with the distraction of barking dogs across the street. It's not that they're not listening, they just don't know or you have to train with bigger distractions.

Stay pawsitive. :)
 

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Punishment never decreases the motivation :) It just makes the dog to invent new ways to get what she wants and may ruin your contact with her.

Being stubborn is perfectly normal for some breeds (that makes wonderful working dogs as they NEED to make decisions themselves) and it's very often seen in 1-2 years old dogs.

Work on improving your contact with her. Decide what you want her to do and encourage her to do it by positive reinforcement and proper guidance. Think of other reasons that may cause your dog to avoid doing what you want (is it connected with some discomfort for her perhaps?)
 

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I'm more concerned about this thread having read your other one than I would have been about either on its own.

Time outs, or putting her in her cage, are almost completely ineffective as punishment. A verbal "no" is far more effective since it can be timed more accurately.
I agree with using a verbal no, but then followed up by verbal praise when desired behavior is achieved, and again with that all important timing.
 

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The best technique to use is positive reinforcement, combined with a LITTLE negative reinforcement. Now by negative reinforcement, I mean a loud "AH" or other noise to startle them. NEVER hit your dog. Reward good behaviour, MILDY punish the bad, and like I said, only use negative voice commands.
 

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I don't want to punish my dog but some situations feel like punishment to him. Just now, we were In a dog park and a bitch In heat was present. Being a teenager, my dog want crazy. Pulling, jumping in her direction, the works. Since he is a very big guy, the only way to hold him back was a couple of very, very hard yanks. As in, my full body weight. I feel very bad when that happens but sometimes there is just no other safe way to handle a situation. Poor guy. (Spaying and neutering is very uncommon in my country and I'm trying to get my husband to agree to it - it doesn't look promising)
 

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I don't need to punish my rescue girl (nor would I want to). We used her trained cues to manage her behavior issues until they are resolved.

Here's an example: https://youtu.be/i_QQ1K2vzP8

The crate is used, but not as punishment. Just to manage her energy and arousal. You can see she's in it maybe a few seconds (door is not closed at all) and she's golden.
 

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I don't. Dogs are never wrong, they are merely reflecting back to us our feelings and emotions, and their "problems" are a great way to examine our denied feelings and emotions and work on those.

For example, there are certain people who I feel I don't want to be judged lacking by, and they make me nervous to be around. My dog picks up on this and always acts jerky around them. I know to fix that kind of behavior I need to address my fears around being judged. My dog is not behaving badly, just tuning into my feelings and emotions and acting on them in a way I am not able to do.
That`s very interesting idea...

What would you say about my dog only liking small black dogs and going dinosaur Rex on almost all other? :D

She`s perfect with people.
 
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