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This would be a interesting thread.

Just tell me how you call back your dog when you're walking him/her with a leash.
Or after a long off leash time, you want to recall him/her.

What's you unique recall command?
Or helpful tricks to recall dogs?
And how do you manage it?:eyeroll:
 

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I make a whiittt kind of sound to get him back to a heel position if he is ahead while on leash.

Off leash I call his name or say "come on then" in a high pitched voice.

A good recall is largely dependent on a strong attraction to handler, stronger than all the distractions out in the world. To get a good recall I worked on increasing attraction and flow. I am always extremely pleased to see him when he comes when called!
 

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Maybe I just read it wrong but how would recall on a leash? aren't they already with you? unless you mean heel?.

I don't currently let my dogs off leash because were still working on a good recall and both have a pretty good prey drive. But it would be interesting to see if people have unique phrases/noises/cues for recall.
Generally for recall the goal is for coming to you to be a even better thing then going off on their own or chasing after something and so on. By managing it, do you mean continuing to have good recall?
 

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If they aren't too far out of heel position, I give a little "here" reminder. If they've gone to the end of their leash, I stop walking and wait for them to come back into position.

Off-leash, they have their standard "Come" recall and then they have their emergency recall. The standard means come over here, but I don't particularly care about the speed. I'd prefer a run (which they normally do anyway), but a walk or trot is acceptable. The emergency recall cue "Ici" (which is just French for "Here") is only ever used is extremely dire circumstances (if I see a dog fight is going to break out, or if they hypothetically ran away). I have never actually had to use my emergency recall, but we practice the cue once a week or so.

The trick to recall is to start small. Small distances, zero distractions. So many people take their three month old puppy to the dog park, and expect him to come. Like @Gnostic Dog I also believe a good relationship is fundamental to a good recall. If my dog for some reason wouldn't come the first time, but eventually sauntered over I would still praise him. It's crazy the amount of people you see screaming "Come. Come! COME!" and then when the dog comes, they get punished. Why would they want to come back?
 

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When we hike, it's almost always off leash. If she's just getting a little too far away, I say, "eh eh too far"... and she knows to wait for me. If I want her completely back to me, I say, "Aspen, come".
 

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On the regular leash it's "no pull", but that isn't a "come back", just to slow down and give the leash a slack.

On the long leash it's "stay close", which basically also is not a "come back, but to not go too far out or fall too far behind (also used off leash).

Off leash (well, on long leash, but not in my hand) it's "Come" when it's supposed to be a fast one or "Bribri" (her name is Bri, but she tends to listen to the double a bit better) when I want her to come to me but don't care too much about the speed.
 

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My guys just have a single recall cue (''come'') on leash or off.
Each direct, speedy recall (my dogs either come and sit or stand close to me facing me) is rewarded with play, a training game, or multiple treats one after another.

Indirect, slower recalls get some praise and perhaps some petting, but not the awesome rewards they get for speedy and direct responses. I also tend to take note of the situation and do similar setups in a more formal setting to train the response I want.

Exception is my blind dog. Her recall used to be the above, but now I only require she try to find me. I repeat myself to help her and often meet her half way. As long as she starts trying to find me when I start calling her and continues until she reaches me, she still gets similar awesome rewards like multiple treats one after the other.

If I know my dogs aren't likely to respond, then I don't call them. I go get them.

All of my dogs know ''let's go''. I don't consider it a recall, but could be what you're looking for. Just means ''walk with me''. I frequently use sniffing and exploring as a reward so ''let's go'' is my trained cue to get them back with me as we continue walking.

I can also call 2 of my dogs into a formal, focused heel on both sides of my body ("heel" and "strut").
 

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I did "Look at That!" training (google LAT) and it leads to a handy recall around dogs. It involves clicker training with treats. Dog learns that he can 'have his cake and eat it too', as in, he gets to Look at the Interesting Thing, gets a treat, and gets to Look at the Interesting Thing again. It has turned him into a dog that will come when called around dogs.

I also play "Let's Go!", which is to call your dog and RUN the other way.
I also play "this way" on a long line, which is to say 'this way' and run a random direction.
These games work because my dog enjoys chasing me. If I was seriously athletic, I could have him awesome perfect in the woods, but alas, I tire long before he does.

Another game I play with the longline, if he runs to the end of the longline jonesing for squirrels/coyotes/deer, whatever it is he's trying to get to, I stop moving, even go slowly backwards and don't move forward in the direction he wants to go until he comes all the way back and circles around me, then I move forward with him. In this scenario, he is often completely uninterested in treats or toys, and I just don't have the energy for the 'chase me' games he likes to play.

All of these are variations on the theme of "you can have your cake and eat it too". Any of these games get my dogs attention and focus on me, and give me the ability to grab him, or do a full recall if I must, but always allow him to just carry on with what he was doing, so he's more than happy to comply.

The only caveat is that this does not work in the woods with wildlife (coyote trails esp.), as he completely loses interest in everything else (hence, the long line).

My dog's part border collie; most of these games exploit his herding instincts in some way.

All dogs are different, by breed, bloodlines, and the individual. It's good to search around for what works.
 

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On leash: Why would I call my dog? She is likely already where she is supposed to be. I do not require heeling or anything, just walking loosely, not wrapping the leash around my legs nor sailing across the road/path.

Well, sometimes I want to hurry up or change direction and then I can call her by name or make a smacking sound by my tongue. I usually direct her with leash pressure. She walks naturally on the loose leash and when it tightens she loosens it again by walking where it is pulling.

Off-leash: Alva knows several come commands. I usually say 'here'. She also knows a whistle and a hand signal. Or I can just rattle her leash/collar. I call her if someone is approaching us or she is approaching an area I consider off-limits. She usually does not come very quickly but as far as her movement is consistent I'll agree. I envy a bit those who can blurt out half the command and the dog is already dashing towards them no matter how many doggie friends and other distractions around and does not stop or slow down before almost bumping into the owner while sitting down.

If Alva has to stay close, I can call her every time she exceeds the distance I've set, or I can tell her to be near (we have not practiced this command much), or I can order her to heel but that would be our obedience trial heeling.

Alva is a rough collie, bred to be someone's right hand, so she is very interested to follow me and easy to train. Even off-leash, she rarely wanders too far from me. We have had little to no problems with recall. She actually already knew it when I picked her up because the breeder had called the puppies every time she fed them. Alva was a bit too interested in other dogs when she was a puppy, but that I solved by a long-line and superjummy treats.

On dog I used to tell to stop before calling her to me. It was easier for her to give up whatever was ahead when she was no more approaching it and a stop did not sound as harsh as turning away and coming to me. She was obeying and still got to observe the distraction. Then she was called away and did not mind it at all.

And I have been looking after some dogs who had problems coming in from their garden. No problem catching them out in the woods but at home... I did long-lined calls and obedience exercises in the garden. I spent time there with the dogs so they would get bored there. I called them with no reason and just gave them treats. I gave them a treat on the porch and once inside the door they got more. Not only when they had been off-leash but every time, even after leashed walks. Nowadays I have no problems getting them in although their owners may still have. Now there is a nuisance puppy who likes to play-attack her elders and their recalls relapsed a bit (not nice to get jumped on when you are trying to obey a command). Leash the puppy before calling or taking the others in and they'll come.
 

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Whenever I'm too lazy and let Bandit go potty off-leash in the yard (we live in a secluded rural area) and he strays a little too far it's always been habit to go "Excuse you!" and he comes back. I know it's a little odd but that's just stuck!
 

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I use his name to get his attention, "Komm!" for when he should come with me but we're not in a hurry (he's a lazy dog and sometimes he's basically moving in snail speed) and a certain whistle when he needs to come fast.
i don't want to use my "come fast"-recall for normal "we should get going so stop sniffing at the same spot for 5 minutes"-recall, since I'm sure he'd start coming slowly then too and sometimes I need him to move fast because of safety reasons or just to be polite with other dog owners.
 

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I use a mobility Scooter so a heel position isn't used as she walks slightly in front and either on the right or the left of my front tire. She adjusts herself to my speed and I adjust myself to hers . If I think she is going too fast a simple "wait Molly" slows her gait. If I want her at my feet (on the scooter) I say "Get up" and when I let her off leash in an open area she never strays too far away and always checks to see where I am. Her recall is a simple "Come Molly" or "Let's Go!" where she then returns to me and will jump on the scooter unless I say "Ok" which is her release cue.... I never 'formally' trained her to do these things but the repetition of doing/ saying the same thing over and over. and our bond, has made her a very well mannered dog! Oh, She also has a "MOLLY, STOP!" command where she stops and stays til I get to her.
 

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I whistle to get my dog's attention, or in the off case that my dog's wandered off too far and can't see me, I whistle as a way of demonstrating where I am so I can be found again. Usually my dog comes back right away once I use the whistle.
 
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