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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So not going to lie, I just deleted a three paragraph long post explaining details, then realized I didn't need them.

Rescues can be weird about some things, we all know that. We also all know they are necessary and do incredible things for the lives of dogs everywhere.

But have you all ever been in a situation where a rescue didn't like you because of something you knew way more about, and could give a lot more research and facts on than they could? Has a rescue ever written you off over something petty, that really wouldn't have been a deal breaker if they'd understood your level of knowledge of dog behavior? Not that I know that much, but sometimes I'm shocked at how little other people seem to know vs. how easily they ascribe to popular theories.

Also, a rescue that is put off because you ask a lot of questions right off the bat about the dog, it's past, it's behavior, it's preferences, why they have it listed as a certain breed...would anyone else think it's a red flag to be annoyed by this, or is it just me?

(Before I give all my private information to a rescue, friend them on facebook, have a home visit, and send them gallons of paperwork, etc I want to know I like this dog...they seem to think that's weird)

Thanks! Hoping some people more rescue-savvy about private rescues than I am will lend opinions :)
 

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I don't seek to adopt from rescues that I know I'm incompatible with, which saves us all a lot of hassle. Whether it's problematic policies, irreconcilable differences, or just difficult people, I'd rather not get involved! But I certainly adopted my current dog from a group with less knowledge (collective or individually) about behavior, and different ideas about training...doesn't bug me, provided I'm not expected to agree to anything problematic. E.g. they said my dog would need plenty of "firm corrections," and I politely said I emphasize progressive reinforcement in my training and would be delighted demonstrate or answer further questions, and everyone was perfectly happy without any need to argue over it. I think they were just thrilled that I promised to do any training at all.

But as far as being reluctant to answer a lot of questions, I can sympathize with things from the rescue angle, and don't tend to see it as a red flag. Answering questions takes time and resources, and often turns out to be pointless (because they never hear from the person again, or because the person isn't at all appropriate for the dog they're asking about), so I've known plenty of private rescue people who get burned out on answering questions from window-shoppers. Requiring an application cuts down the less-seriously-interested inquiries, and filling out an application is a really good way to signal to a rescue that you value their time as highly as your own.

I can't recall ever being rejected by a rescue over something petty, but I also rarely run into issues that can't be solved with clear communication, so maybe the missing details in your post would help me give a better answer on that one. Generally speaking, if I'm contacting rescues, it's with the specific aim of finding out if I want to apply for an animal...educating the rescue, changing their policies, or arguing over dog training/husbandry are not really priorities for me in that situation.
 

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Yeah, I have found that there are some rescues that have outdated information on training and behavior. More than that though, I find some rescues have...well, sugarcoated ideas of dog behavior, and what a dog's potential is. Like they want the animals to get adopted and they think if they tell them all the issues they have, then that will hurt their chances. But not properly educating people enough about the animal isn't helping anyone.

I remember last year when we had to return Sophie the Beagle because she kept fighting with Stella over some intense resource guarding or because she randomly decided she didn't want to play anymore. The adoption counselor kept saying we should try more (it had been 3 weeks), and that it's normal for dogs to fight that much. She then told me that she has 4 dogs who fight all the time, and one of them, a Pit she's hand raised since 4 weeks, once took a huge chunk out of her GSD's back. I was rather horrified and speechless. It appalled me that someone would keep an animal who consistently behaved like that with their other dogs, no matter how much they loved them. I felt so guilty and confused after that I consulted many other dog people and multi-dog owners and most agreed that it's dangerous and insane to keep such a chaotic household.

I do think there are a lot of good hearted people out there, but not all informed. I consider there being a difference between dog lover--someone who just loves dogs but isn't very educated about them, and a dog person, someone like a trainer, groomer, vet/vet tech, sports handler, that knows a lot about dog behavior, psychology, health, etc. It's usually easy to see the difference just how people talk about dogs.
 

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I don't seek to adopt from rescues that I know I'm incompatible with, which saves us all a lot of hassle. Whether it's problematic policies, irreconcilable differences, or just difficult people, I'd rather not get involved! But I certainly adopted my current dog from a group with less knowledge (collective or individually) about behavior, and different ideas about training...doesn't bug me, provided I'm not expected to agree to anything problematic. E.g. they said my dog would need plenty of "firm corrections," and I politely said I emphasize progressive reinforcement in my training and would be delighted demonstrate or answer further questions, and everyone was perfectly happy without any need to argue over it. I think they were just thrilled that I promised to do any training at all.

But as far as being reluctant to answer a lot of questions, I can sympathize with things from the rescue angle, and don't tend to see it as a red flag. Answering questions takes time and resources, and often turns out to be pointless (because they never hear from the person again, or because the person isn't at all appropriate for the dog they're asking about), so I've known plenty of private rescue people who get burned out on answering questions from window-shoppers. Requiring an application cuts down the less-seriously-interested inquiries, and filling out an application is a really good way to signal to a rescue that you value their time as highly as your own.

I can't recall ever being rejected by a rescue over something petty, but I also rarely run into issues that can't be solved with clear communication, so maybe the missing details in your post would help me give a better answer on that one. Generally speaking, if I'm contacting rescues, it's with the specific aim of finding out if I want to apply for an animal...educating the rescue, changing their policies, or arguing over dog training/husbandry are not really priorities for me in that situation.
^^This. Rescues are volunteer run. Many have their own families, pets, jobs to take care of on top of devoting time to the rescue. Sometimes people can come off too strong or condescending when they try to educate others on dogs. Not saying you did, but there could have been miscommunication along the lines with you and the rescue. The amount of knowledge a person has is very subjective as well. One person may think another is amazing and another may think the opposite.

Providing your info gives the rescue the opportunity to sort through potential good homes and which would not be suitable for the dog. They don't always have the time or resources to go through every single application with a fine-tooth comb from the get-go. They do that with the application they feel would best suit the dog; hence the ref/vet checks, in-homes, etc. That is a reason why the application helps tremendously with this and shows commitment from the applicant. If you don't feel comfortable with that, perhaps you can tell them what area you live in instead of the exact house number.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Here's the thing--I filled out an application, a long one. I felt like after that I did deserve to know more about the dog before I was required to drive two hours and meet him.
 

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Here's the thing--I filled out an application, a long one. I felt like after that I did deserve to know more about the dog before I was required to drive two hours and meet him.
I agree with that. If you filled out the app and they wanted to move forward with the adoptions, more info should be provided to you about the dog at this point. With the rescue I volunteer for, after the app is submitted and ref checks and in-home are done, the foster home calls the person to talk in more detail about the dog and set up a meet-n-greet. Sometimes if they are really far from one another, they meet half-way or the applicant just wants to adopt the dog and goes and picks him/her up. Some people don't mind long distance drives to meet the dog first. It all goes case by case.
 

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I actually encountered something slightly similar with Chisum's rescue. In that case, it wasn't so much that she wouldn't tell me about the dog in particular (she's very adamant that dogs get matched with appropriate homes so is usually fairly forthcoming about behavior) but rather that she doesn't often share a lot about where the dogs came from - a point she emphasizes on her site. Granted, sometimes she doesn't know and when I asked about him she was happy to tell me where he'd come from, but I just thought it was a weird thing to include in his description.

And, of course, some of what she told me was downright wrong. She said he was social and good with other dogs because he currently lived with a LOT of them - turns out, that really just added to his problems.

Personally, I think it's a red flag if a rescue doesn't want to talk to you about a particular dog. I'd think it would be a GOOD thing to have someone want to know if they are a good home for the dog or if is really a dog they are interested in. But, maybe they think that THEY should be authority on such things. Who knows?

Seems like some dog people in general believe all others with dogs or an interest in dogs are clueless. It's not totally incorrect - many are - but not all. Both consults I've had with vets regarding Chisum (my regular vet as well as a vet who specializes in behavior cases - but not a true vet behaviorist) seemed to assume that I was clueless and that was frustrating. Not to say I know it all!! But to let them know I've worked with a trainer, that I've done the CC/DS, LAT, some BAT - and be told that I've either been doing it wrong or, as my regular vet claimed, my dog was just "protective" and I should be happy about it -- was disheartening.
 

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Y'all know I am the king of disabled dogs, and that my mom has a wiener sanctuary, so we deal with all sorts of rescue situations and have experience with dogs of all breed, temperament, and ability level.

I have been in so many arguments with rescues about dogs that I am always hesitant to work with them and would probably not go through one to adopt again. Undisclosed behavior problems, ignorance or straight-up lying about breeds and ages, insisting that my knowledge of behavior is wrong (How can the dog be mad? His tail is wagging!), that they know the dog's disability or plan of care better than me because they read something online (we're treating this KCS with coconut oil and that's final!)(Deaf dogs don't bark)...

Don't get me wrong, I am FAR from a dog expert. If someone is able to show me that I am wrong about something or they genuinely know the topic better than I do, great! I love working with those people because they make me a better dog person. But there are some topics I really do know best. Honestly, if I am asked to foster or pull and a rescue won't listen to something I know I know more about than they do, my answer now is "Okay. Thank you for your time." and I leave. There are hundreds of rescues and thousands of dogs that could use my help. If a rescue is going to belittle my time and expertise (particularly when they contact me!) I just have to walk away. I get that lots of rescues are volunteer based and that not everyone has the time, money, or willingness to spend learning about dogs like we do, but I can't waste my time disagreeing when I could be helping another dog.
 

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my mom has a wiener sanctuary
o/t, but I totally turned into a 12 year old boy and did a 5 minute Bevis/Butthead gigglefest over this. ;)
 
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