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Discussion Starter #1
Today the vet said my 13 week old puppy's ribs are too prominent. I was already a little concerned because he eats less than a cup of kibble a day and the bag suggests almost two cups. He's almost 10 pounds, and he's growing, so know he's not starving. But I would like him to eat more. Maybe he just doesn't like his food? He's eating taste of the wild prairie puppy food. He seemed to love it for the first couple weeks...
Anyway, I'd love suggestions. I've tried softening with warm water, mixing peanut butter in, mixing wet food in, hiding treats in it, allowing all day access to his food, and making it a game by putting it in his Kong.
 

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What breed puppy is he? If he's a larger breed you don't want him to heavy on growing joints. How many times a day are you feeding? The guide on the bag is just a guide, some puppies will eat more or less and you should adjust accordingly to your puppy. Could be just feeding too much for him, and maybe back off a feeding. A healthy dog/puppy won't starve themselves. They will wean themselves off of some feedings as they grow.

If it's pickiness starting up, then the more you "sugar coat" with peanut butter etc, the less he will eat. As long as he is healthy, he will eat.
 

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Samantha is a picky eater, and gets tired of the same food. We buy food for her from a kitchen that cooks only for dogs, and they offer a variety, so we change her food virtually every week. She gets food that is turkey based, lamb based, venison based, and more, but all has ground organ meat and carrots, and or sweet potato, squash, berries and more. So far her favorite is the venison based, but the variety seems to keep her more interested. I also feel her nutrition needs are much better met, than feeding processed kibble, or really any processed dog food. Since we switched her food, she is a more energetic dog than she was, so there must be something nutritionally good happening.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
We've now tried taste of the wild, fromm, and orijen. I thought the orijen was a winner but after a couple days he's refusing that too.
And yes, he's a poodle Australian Shepherd mix. Sorry I didn't say that sooner!
Vet says he's perfectly healthy other than being too skinny...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Samantha is a picky eater, and gets tired of the same food. We buy food for her from a kitchen that cooks only for dogs, and they offer a variety, so we change her food virtually every week. She gets food that is turkey based, lamb based, venison based, and more, but all has ground organ meat and carrots, and or sweet potato, squash, berries and more. So far her favorite is the venison based, but the variety seems to keep her more interested. I also feel her nutrition needs are much better met, than feeding processed kibble, or really any processed dog food. Since we switched her food, she is a more energetic dog than she was, so there must be something nutritionally good happening.
How would I go about finding something similar in my area?? Or is it available online?
 

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Focus fats and protein levels in the diet

Have a look at the fats, protein and nutrition levels on the products. Because puppies grow so quickly these levels will all be much higher then they are for other life stages.

Have a look lower on this page, gives you a good idea of ideal levels (based on how much you should be feeding your dog)

Glow Australian Chicken Puppy Food - Australian Made & Owned

The taste is a huge factor as well, but this is hard to determine as some dogs are very picky and change tastes.
 

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Your puppy may be teething and, that can make eating hard, dry kibble uncomfortable for her. My 13 week old is in that phase. Try soaking the kibble or, even mixing it with a salt free gravy or broth - you can use canned food and warm water to make a gravy if you like.

By about 7 months that teething is over and, it's time to reduce the water in the food and, get back to dry kibble. A dog won't starve themselves to death, they will eat if food is available before they harm themselves but, it doesn't hurt to consider what the dog might be experiencing that could make it reluctant to eat a certain food or, certain type of food.
 

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Your puppy may be teething and, that can make eating hard, dry kibble uncomfortable for her. My 13 week old is in that phase. Try soaking the kibble or, even mixing it with a salt free gravy or broth - you can use canned food and warm water to make a gravy if you like.

By about 7 months that teething is over and, it's time to reduce the water in the food and, get back to dry kibble. A dog won't starve themselves to death, they will eat if food is available before they harm themselves but, it doesn't hurt to consider what the dog might be experiencing that could make it reluctant to eat a certain food or, certain type of food.
 
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