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My puppy Winnie, is usually by my side. I’ve had her about two weeks now and she’s a great dog but sometimes she has trouble listening. I worry that she might not be loyal.

Today I kept calling her and she didn’t come to me and just went into the neighbor’s yard so I had to go get her. It really bothers me that she sometimes doesn’t come when called. I worry that she might not be a loyal dog.

we had one dog that was like a ray of sunshine. Well she wasn’t our dog but the neighbors dog however we took her fishing with us, riding, and swimming. She was the best and would kill any snake around us. At times when a snake was around she would take her body and push us back. She was loyal and very protective.

I just hope my pup might be able to live up in her name.

To dog owners who have experience with a lot of dogs, when your dog was a puppy did you automatically know that she’d grow up to be a loyal-always-at-your-side type of dog or was she kind of a trouble maker who you always questioned on what type of dog they would become?
 

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Some dogs are more independent than others, while some are more handler focussed. What breed is she?

I think it is early to expect a reliable recall from a puppy. To work on that, coming back to you has to be far, far better than whatever else she might be doing. So at this stage, to set her up for success and teach her how great coming to you actually is, I'd start in low distraction environments and use fabulous rewards.

My dog is 9, and has always been rewarded for recall, every time. Sometimes it is food from his normal allowance, sometimes a treat, sometimes an ear rub. Switching it around apparently keeps the dog keen, it's the same principle that makes people play slot machines apparently. But that's for later; for now, for your puppy, I'd be using tiny pieces of roast chicken or frankfurter sausage.
 

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My puppy Winnie, is usually by my side. I’ve had her about two weeks now and she’s a great dog but sometimes she has trouble listening. I worry that she might not be loyal.

Today I kept calling her and she didn’t come to me and just went into the neighbor’s yard so I had to go get her. It really bothers me that she sometimes doesn’t come when called. I worry that she might not be a loyal dog.

we had one dog that was like a ray of sunshine. Well she wasn’t our dog but the neighbors dog however we took her fishing with us, riding, and swimming. She was the best and would kill any snake around us. At times when a snake was around she would take her body and push us back. She was loyal and very protective.

I just hope my pup might be able to live up in her name.

To dog owners who have experience with a lot of dogs, when your dog was a puppy did you automatically know that she’d grow up to be a loyal-always-at-your-side type of dog or was she kind of a trouble maker who you always questioned on what type of dog they would become?
Hey i wouldn't go to far as to say she is not loyal, perhaps she is not subjected to discipline try training her
My puppy Winnie, is usually by my side. I’ve had her about two weeks now and she’s a great dog but sometimes she has trouble listening. I worry that she might not be loyal.

Today I kept calling her and she didn’t come to me and just went into the neighbor’s yard so I had to go get her. It really bothers me that she sometimes doesn’t come when called. I worry that she might not be a loyal dog.

we had one dog that was like a ray of sunshine. Well she wasn’t our dog but the neighbors dog however we took her fishing with us, riding, and swimming. She was the best and would kill any snake around us. At times when a snake was around she would take her body and push us back. She was loyal and very protective.

I just hope my pup might be able to live up in her name.

To dog owners who have experience with a lot of dogs, when your dog was a puppy did you automatically know that she’d grow up to be a loyal-always-at-your-side type of dog or was she kind of a trouble maker who you always questioned on what type of dog they would become?
  1. i wouldn't say she is not loyal perhaps she had not been subjected to discipline try and see how much better her behaviour improves
 

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Well what is a loyal dog? Is it a dog that will always listen to you and do whatever you say? Even if it’s due to fear? Is it a dog that will protect you no matter what? Even when you tell him not to? Is it a dog that will show unconditional love to you? Even if they won’t listen to you?

I think we often have an unreasonable expectation on what loyalty is and how a dog should act. And we also often read the situation in favor of our ego. Even if the dog is acting due his own cause and benefit we often want it to seem like they did it because of us. For instance, are you sure that the reason for that dog killing the snake was to protecting you from the snake or did she kill the snake because of natural instincts, prey drive and to protect herself? A dog is in general a loyal animal, they want to be close to humans and we can create amazing bonds with them. But many times they will act on what is beneficial to them. If a dog comes on recall or not doesn’t necessarily have to do with loyalty. That depends on how trained or responsive the dog is. However, it also matters what kind of relationship you have with the dog, a stronger relationship often means that your dog is more likely to listen to you. Some dogs are naturally more keen to listen to us humans while others are more self-contained. What they’re more likely to be often depends on the breed but also the individual and the relationship to their owner.

While some will say that a Golden Retriever is a typical loyal dog some could argue that they’re not since they’re likely to love every person they meet and often has a “will to please” every person and the interest to be around any person. Then you would argue that a truly loyal dog is a dog that would only have the interest in listening to you and being around you. Even though it may not be a dog that generally has a big interest in humans and might not be an “always-at-your-side” type dog.

Loyalty is interpreted in different ways but in the end it all comes down to the relationship between you and your dog. If you have a breed that is more people focused she’s more likely to have the interest in always being by your side rather than a breed that is more independent. But then loyalty depends on the bond you build between you and the dog, not just the dog itself. Coming when called can, to some extent, be a question of loyalty but at the same time it can purely be a matter of training.
 

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Two weeks? OMG she doesnt even know you yet.

Give it time build a relationship invest in training and your dog will grow to be part of your family.
You cant expect a pup to come ready made they are living breathing beings not robots.
 

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Two weeks? OMG she doesnt even know you yet.

Give it time build a relationship invest in training and your dog will grow to be part of your family.
You cant expect a pup to come ready made they are living breathing beings not robots.
I’m giving it time and I know they are not robots. Did I say they were robots? No I didn’t. I want her to be loyal and listen because I’m scared that she will get hurt if she doesn’t. I’m just looking for your advice not your judgement.
 

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Well what is a loyal dog? Is it a dog that will always listen to you and do whatever you say? Even if it’s due to fear? Is it a dog that will protect you no matter what? Even when you tell him not to? Is it a dog that will show unconditional love to you? Even if they won’t listen to you?

I think we often have an unreasonable expectation on what loyalty is and how a dog should act. And we also often read the situation in favor of our ego. Even if the dog is acting due his own cause and benefit we often want it to seem like they did it because of us. For instance, are you sure that the reason for that dog killing the snake was to protecting you from the snake or did she kill the snake because of natural instincts, prey drive and to protect herself? A dog is in general a loyal animal, they want to be close to humans and we can create amazing bonds with them. But many times they will act on what is beneficial to them. If a dog comes on recall or not doesn’t necessarily have to do with loyalty. That depends on how trained or responsive the dog is. However, it also matters what kind of relationship you have with the dog, a stronger relationship often means that your dog is more likely to listen to you. Some dogs are naturally more keen to listen to us humans while others are more self-contained. What they’re more likely to be often depends on the breed but also the individual and the relationship to their owner.

While some will say that a Golden Retriever is a typical loyal dog some could argue that they’re not since they’re likely to love every person they meet and often has a “will to please” every person and the interest to be around any person. Then you would argue that a truly loyal dog is a dog that would only have the interest in listening to you and being around you. Even though it may not be a dog that generally has a big interest in humans and might not be an “always-at-your-side” type dog.

Loyalty is interpreted in different ways but in the end it all comes down to the relationship between you and your dog. If you have a breed that is more people focused she’s more likely to have the interest in always being by your side rather than a breed that is more independent. But then loyalty depends on the bond you build between you and the dog, not just the dog itself. Coming when called can, to some extent, be a question of loyalty but at the same time it can purely be a matter of training.
My first week I’ve already trained her to sit, lay, and rollover. By loyalty I just want her to listen to me especially when I call for her. She stays around me but tends to roam and I’m scared she might go in the road or get hurt. What really scares me is sometimes my neighbors dogs get out and they are mean. They have already attacked and killed a dog. If they would get out and Winnie doesn’t listen to me I’m afraid she might get hurt. Does that make sense?
 

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She stays around me but tends to roam and I’m scared she might go in the road or get hurt.
If you have traffic, keeping her on leash is a sensible precaution.

And frankly, if your neighbour's dogs were to attack her, she probably wouldn't be able to come to you if you called her, no matter how well trained or how much she wanted to. If that is something that you think might be a real risk, you need to speak to your neighbour to keep their dogs under control or involve your animal control authorities.
 

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My first week I’ve already trained her to sit, lay, and rollover. By loyalty I just want her to listen to me especially when I call for her. She stays around me but tends to roam and I’m scared she might go in the road or get hurt. What really scares me is sometimes my neighbors dogs get out and they are mean. They have already attacked and killed a dog. If they would get out and Winnie doesn’t listen to me I’m afraid she might get hurt. Does that make sense?
Yes, that makes sense but that is a matter of training. You should never let a dog loose if you don’t have 100% recall, at least in busier areas. So until you’ve achieved that (might be never) you have to keep her safe on a leash or in a fenced area.

But I’m still concerned about the other dogs, having Winnie on the leash won’t protect her from the other dogs. Have you talked to your neighbor about that? It’s a very serious situation.
 

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My first week I’ve already trained her to sit, lay, and rollover. By loyalty I just want her to listen to me especially when I call for her. She stays around me but tends to roam and I’m scared she might go in the road or get hurt. What really scares me is sometimes my neighbors dogs get out and they are mean. They have already attacked and killed a dog. If they would get out and Winnie doesn’t listen to me I’m afraid she might get hurt. Does that make sense?
How old is Winnie, and what breed or breeds? All of that matters when it comes to training and recall. If she's a young puppy she will go through different stages, including fear stages where she will want to cling more to you, and the dreaded teenage stage (around 8 months old) where she'll want to blow off everything you taught her in favor of doing what she wants to do, when she wants to do it.

She may sit, lay, and rollover, but did you proof the command, in other words will she do so everywhere? The proofing is the important part, and what is likely missing in your training. If she'll obey you everywhere in the house, then it's time to move out to the yard and start training her there. Once she's good there it's time to take her to the park, or maybe a quiet hardware, or pet store. With recall it's the same thing, you need to practice everywhere.

I had a dog, Jersey (Chow Chow x herding breed x who knows what else), that was very reliable off leash so long as I kept in view of her. I could recall her off of rabbits, I could call her back to me if she was 100 yards away down the dirt road, BUT there was a hitch. I would be standing talking to my neighbor by his house and I'd keeping an eye on her. She'd get up and slowly start to edge her way to the front corner of his house, glancing back at me every now and then to see if I'd noticed her. I'd generally let her get within a couple feet of the corner before calling her back because if she got around the corner she'd disappear and no amount of calling her would get her to come back till she was ready. My terrier mix, Shadow, had lousy recall and nothing I could tempt him with was good enough to get him to come back to me if he was off leash, so his off leash privileges were revoked. My current dog, Zody (Chi x Dach), is doing very well with recall, but we are still proofing it. All 3 of my dogs were loyal to me, but they were / are living beings that had their own interest and quirks, all 3 were / are as different from one another as night and day.

Keep practicing with your Winnie, and hopefully she'll develop a rock solid interest, whether or not she'll ever be a dog that is completely reliable off leash and that you could let loose and have her go hiking, camping, and fishing without a lead only time will tell.
 

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I’m giving it time and I know they are not robots. Did I say they were robots? No I didn’t. I want her to be loyal and listen because I’m scared that she will get hurt if she doesn’t. I’m just looking for your advice not your judgement.
Oh Im so sorry you feel offended :cautious:... Heres the advice ..Keep your dog on a lead until you have built a relationship and taught proper recall. This pup will not automatically be loyal from day one because it hasnt been taught and loyalty is not pre programmed.
Do not expect a young pup you have only had a short time to compare to a dog you once had years ago, its not fair on the pup.
If you invest time and training in this pup it will be loyal but loyalty and respect are two way streets..
 

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How old is Winnie, and what breed or breeds? All of that matters when it comes to training and recall. If she's a young puppy she will go through different stages, including fear stages where she will want to cling more to you, and the dreaded teenage stage (around 8 months old) where she'll want to blow off everything you taught her in favor of doing what she wants to do, when she wants to do it.

She may sit, lay, and rollover, but did you proof the command, in other words will she do so everywhere? The proofing is the important part, and what is likely missing in your training. If she'll obey you everywhere in the house, then it's time to move out to the yard and start training her there. Once she's good there it's time to take her to the park, or maybe a quiet hardware, or pet store. With recall it's the same thing, you need to practice everywhere.

I had a dog, Jersey (Chow Chow x herding breed x who knows what else), that was very reliable off leash so long as I kept in view of her. I could recall her off of rabbits, I could call her back to me if she was 100 yards away down the dirt road, BUT there was a hitch. I would be standing talking to my neighbor by his house and I'd keeping an eye on her. She'd get up and slowly start to edge her way to the front corner of his house, glancing back at me every now and then to see if I'd noticed her. I'd generally let her get within a couple feet of the corner before calling her back because if she got around the corner she'd disappear and no amount of calling her would get her to come back till she was ready. My terrier mix, Shadow, had lousy recall and nothing I could tempt him with was good enough to get him to come back to me if he was off leash, so his off leash privileges were revoked. My current dog, Zody (Chi x Dach), is doing very well with recall, but we are still proofing it. All 3 of my dogs were loyal to me, but they were / are living beings that had their own interest and quirks, all 3 were / are as different from one another as night and day.

Keep practicing with your Winnie, and hopefully she'll develop a rock solid interest, whether or not she'll ever be a dog that is completely reliable off leash and that you could let loose and have her go hiking, camping, and fishing without a lead only time will tell.
She’s a German Shepard mixed. Someone dropped her off and I’m not sure of her age but she seems to be around 10-14 weeks maybe. We are taking her to the vet this week so hopefully they’ll be able to tell me more.
 

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Oh Im so sorry you feel offended :cautious:... Heres the advice ..Keep your dog on a lead until you have built a relationship and taught proper recall. This pup will not automatically be loyal from day one because it hasnt been taught and loyalty is not pre programmed.
Do not expect a young pup you have only had a short time to compare to a dog you once had years ago, its not fair on the pup.
If you invest time and training in this pup it will be loyal but loyalty and respect are two way streets..
Wow thank you for giving actual advice and not being judgements I didn’t know you could do that.
 

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Yes, that makes sense but that is a matter of training. You should never let a dog loose if you don’t have 100% recall, at least in busier areas. So until you’ve achieved that (might be never) you have to keep her safe on a leash or in a fenced area.

But I’m still concerned about the other dogs, having Winnie on the leash won’t protect her from the other dogs. Have you talked to your neighbor about that? It’s a very serious situation.
Everyone in my hollow has confronted her but she claims they’re her “guard dogs/babies and there’s nothing she can do,” but honestly they’re just assholes. The dog they killed had been a member of their family for years it probably even watched them grow up. The dog or dogs that did kill it were German Shepards and it was an elderly cocker spaniel. I didn’t see it but they said the cocker spaniel was literary shredded. It didn’t stand a chance. It was a good dog and I’d always play with it. The German Shepard’s though when they get out my siblings are not allowed outside when they get loose because my family are afraid of them. I understand German Shepards are territorial and that’s why I’m so keen on training Winnie. I introduce her to everyone, and my neighbor has a collie puppy that I introduce to Winnie when we go on our walks. She loves dogs she doesn’t like cats that much but when I introduced her to my cat she was happily wagging her tail. My cat, Mischief didn’t really like her. It was the first dog she had ever been introduced to. My grandpa’s hollow is full of cats and Winnie barks at them so I don’t know if she likes them or dislikes them.
Also I practiced with my dog yesterday with a 25 foot leash. I see a big improvement with her already.
 

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Hello, Winnie. I think Sunflower and Rain gave some really good advice so not much more to add. The key takeaways are always be patient and give it some time, especially with a new young pup. I think as humans sometimes we fall into the trap of comparing and expecting a new relationship to be similar to something previous that we hold fond memories for. I am no different so I can understand.

Certain breeds can have innate characteristics that we can expect but more so I look at each dogs personality individually. For me, the amazing part of having a dog is going through that journey and building that relationship over time as you both get to know each other. I always try to see each of my dogs for who they are and respect those boundaries. Respect will lead to your dog trusting you which will strengthen your bond and relationship. The recall will become natural for them as they grow up because dogs are drawn to leadership and strength.

My 15 pd toy fox terrier is the runt of the litter and he has fear aggression around new dogs, however, he is bold and fearless when he feels unsafe or protective. For him I need to respect his personality and not put him in situations where he feels unsafe. I also need to show him I have control of situations. He’s not the type of dog a person can just run up to and smother with hugs/kisses. I need to give him space, let him get adjusted on his terms but at the same time let him know what I expect from him. When I adopted him they warned me he ran away twice from his previous owners. Now he’s like attached to my hip no matter where we are outside. He feels the safest around me and so recall becomes natural for him, no treats or training needed. This is just an example of understanding what type of personality you have irrespective of breed and being the type of leader that they need.

My 75 pd american stafforshire terrier is very independent and social around any new person or dog. For him I need to give him freedom to roam and investigate but be more firm when needed. The more freedom I give him to investigate while being there to guide him, the stronger our bond becomes. My relationship with him is totally different but still built with respect and trust over time. He also has great recall without using treats or training.

Anyhow, good luck with your new pup! Take the time to get to learn who he is and what he needs and the bond/loyolty will come naturally.
 
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