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So my partner and I both work as seasonal workers in national parks. During our in-between seasons, we stay at their parents' house and stay in the garage so we have space to ourselves. Our new dog Ranger, a Catahoula, gets out to the dog park regularly and runs in the backyard with the other dogs in the house as well. However, whenever we're in the garage together, he gets extremely territorial and growls at anyone who tries to come in to do laundry. At this point, the only people who are allowed to come in and out of the garage without problems are my partner's mom, my partner, and me. He's also begun chewing on things, which he had never done before now. He has had a couple of toys, but he destroys them in a matter of minutes, so he gets bored and finds other things to chew on.
Thanks to anyone who can help.
 

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You need to claim that area back.

When my current dog started claiming the sofa at about 1 year we spent a few days teaching him "get down" and "go to your bed". After a short time when he saw that someone was going to sit on the sofa he would get down and go to his bed without hearing the command.

After a while it started to relax again and he was allowed on the sofa when people were sitting there. If he started getting in the way or growling because people were moving around then he was told to get down and go to his bed.

After a month or so it was over and he now lays quietly on the couch when other people are there. We also taught him to "scoot over" if someone wants to sit where he is laying. It's this point is peaceful and cozy.

In your context I would remove the dog from the garage entirely. I would teach him get out or to go in a crate on command. You will need to spend time on this and do a thorough job of conditioning this because he's not going to want to cooperate, especially at first. If you're not sure how to approach this then hire a trainer for a day. It will be well worth your money.

Once you have him conditioned to leave or go to a crate on command then you can slowly allow him to be in the space a long as there is no sign whatsoever of claiming behaviour. Any sign of claiming; a growl, snarl, bark or even just standing at attention and holding his ground should result in him being told to leave or go to his crate (whichever you decide to do... personally I would train both options).

Make any sense?
 

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Having a dog at home is both amazing and unpleasant at the same time, but they can make a mess, enter the kitchen, chew on your valuable furniture or jump on every dog or person they see. Most people fail to teach their dog to behave, simply because they don’t understand how a dog’s mind works.

In order to have the perfect dog, you must win your dog’s mind. If you don’t achieve this first, then you will be struggling the all the way. When I talk about winning your dog’s mind what I really mean is that your dog looks to you for all the decisions. If you know what to do, you can simply teach your dog manners in less than a day. For example, you can stop your dog from entering the kitchen area by drawing a line on the floor with a tape and whenever your dog crosses that line, force him/her to go back and give them a treat when they listen. Doing this few times can make your dog not to enter your kitchen area.
 
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