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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Heya!

My anxiety about the new puppy is getting better and being replaced with excitement the closer I get to the day my boyfriend and I bring her home (just another couple of weeks!). Thanks so much to those who replied to my last post about that anxiety. It feels good to know I'm not alone in that "Omg! what if I'm a terrible dog mum!" fear :D

Anyhow, I've been doing a lot of research on housebreaking and I'm having a little worry about accomplishing this training in a high rise apartment. I know it CAN be done. There are plenty of dogs in my building who were raised in highrises. I'm just concerned that taking Gerdy out to do her business every hour or so isn't going to be easy from the 16th floor and am wondering if the use of puppy pads doesn't add confusion to the training. I grew up having dogs in the family for a good 20 years, but all of them were "out door only" dogs (always hated that), so housebreaking isn't something I'm too familiar with... but it does seem like it should be pretty straight forward? Heck, I've read so many conflicting methods online, I'm just worried my approach will screw up my dog and I'll have a forever-poop-on-the-floor scenario. LOL!

Basically my plan is to be keeping her strictly indoors until she's had all of her shots. So she'll be using pads in a designated area and we'll be working on crate training as well. Lots of praise and treats, obviously no scolding or "rubbing her nose in her mistakes" (this was my grandparents' oldschool method... ugh). Once she's ready to safely go outside with other dogs, I'll be bringing along a soiled pad so she knows that the grass is where to go, and of course lavish her with praise and a treat whenever she goes appropriately. Then I guess as time goes on and her self control gets stronger, I'll slowly use less and less pads indoors until she's exclusively able to hold on until we get her outside.

Another point I should add: I'll be taking a few weeks off of work once I bring her home, but after that, she'll be coming into the studio with me daily. Would this be confusing at all to her potty training? My job is such that I CAN work from home if I so choose, but the studio environment is easiest in case someone needs to talk to me in person. I'd be using puppy pads at work, too, and it's easy access to outside if need be. It'd be great for her socialization and training as well.

Please let me know if I'm missing anything or if you have any tips to add! I'm super keen to hear any experiences anyone has had with raising a puppy in an apartment.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
By the way, I'm really sorry if this post is idiotic. I'm still a bit paranoid of screwing up, I guess :/
 

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Heya!

My anxiety about the new puppy is getting better and being replaced with excitement the closer I get to the day my boyfriend and I bring her home (just another couple of weeks!). Thanks so much to those who replied to my last post about that anxiety. It feels good to know I'm not alone in that "Omg! what if I'm a terrible dog mum!" fear :D

Anyhow, I've been doing a lot of research on housebreaking and I'm having a little worry about accomplishing this training in a high rise apartment. I know it CAN be done. There are plenty of dogs in my building who were raised in highrises. I'm just concerned that taking Gerdy out to do her business every hour or so isn't going to be easy from the 16th floor and am wondering if the use of puppy pads doesn't add confusion to the training. I grew up having dogs in the family for a good 20 years, but all of them were "out door only" dogs (always hated that), so housebreaking isn't something I'm too familiar with... but it does seem like it should be pretty straight forward? Heck, I've read so many conflicting methods online, I'm just worried my approach will screw up my dog and I'll have a forever-poop-on-the-floor scenario. LOL!

Basically my plan is to be keeping her strictly indoors until she's had all of her shots. So she'll be using pads in a designated area and we'll be working on crate training as well. Lots of praise and treats, obviously no scolding or "rubbing her nose in her mistakes" (this was my grandparents' oldschool method... ugh). Once she's ready to safely go outside with other dogs, I'll be bringing along a soiled pad so she knows that the grass is where to go, and of course lavish her with praise and a treat whenever she goes appropriately. Then I guess as time goes on and her self control gets stronger, I'll slowly use less and less pads indoors until she's exclusively able to hold on until we get her outside.

Another point I should add: I'll be taking a few weeks off of work once I bring her home, but after that, she'll be coming into the studio with me daily. Would this be confusing at all to her potty training? My job is such that I CAN work from home if I so choose, but the studio environment is easiest in case someone needs to talk to me in person. I'd be using puppy pads at work, too, and it's easy access to outside if need be. It'd be great for her socialization and training as well.

Please let me know if I'm missing anything or if you have any tips to add! I'm super keen to hear any experiences anyone has had with raising a puppy in an apartment.

Thanks!

I don't have a lot of tips about highrise potty training. In general if you can avoid the puppy pads it's easiest (I couldn't because of my work schedule, pup is 95% of the way house trained at just shy of 8 months old now)

Just a couple thoughts though - As long as your pup has there first set of shots you don't need to keep them completely separated from other dogs. If there is an area outside or nearby that other dogs don't frequent it should be fairly safe to take her to that area to do her business. You can talk to your vet about this they will be able to better guild you on the dangers in your particular area. Also playing with any pups that you know to be up to date on their shots is a fine play mate.

You should start looking into puppy socialization classes... theses are SUPER helpful and your pup can start as early as 8 weeks old (provided they have their first set of shots, look for places that use positive reinforcement)

You're going to want to get your pup used to the elevator quickly. Keep lots of high value treats with you any time you're in or around the elevator until she's comfortable. And make sure she's clearing the gap at the door and not being rushed. When you're making 15 trips outside everyday with your pup the last thing you want is a dog that goes bonkers in the elevator.

The housetraining sticky here has some of the best info I've seen for helping to get a pup housetrained. http://www.dogforum.com/housetraining/house-training-how-tos-2135/
 

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Housebreaking has always been fairly easy for me. I crate train right away, because they're not likely to potty in there, and after being in the crate for awhile, its a good time for a potty break. The biggest thing is being consistent and very watchful. You have to catch every accident so you can show them that you want them to potty outside. Mine were house trained quickly and easily that way, and virtually never have accidents.

I would avoid use pads if at all possible, because it makes house training much more difficult unless you're wanting them to always use pads.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks so much for the feedback! I guess my anxiety is just getting the better of me and I'm not giving myself enough credit for what I already know. I've scoured YouTube for every bit of helpful info I could over the past few months, so it all comes down to trusting my gut and getting to know my puppy's quirks. I know we'll figure each other out and accidents will happen. As for the pads, I agree that they should probably be avoided if possible, but they'll be a necessary evil for the first little while since I am going to keep her indoors until she's had her full set of shots as recommended by my vet... just to be safe, really.

Cheers and thanks again! Regardless of what I already knew, your feedback WAS helpful! If anything it confirms I'm not an idiot dog owner. LOL
 

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Thanks so much for the feedback! I guess my anxiety is just getting the better of me and I'm not giving myself enough credit for what I already know. I've scoured YouTube for every bit of helpful info I could over the past few months, so it all comes down to trusting my gut and getting to know my puppy's quirks. I know we'll figure each other out and accidents will happen. As for the pads, I agree that they should probably be avoided if possible, but they'll be a necessary evil for the first little while since I am going to keep her indoors until she's had her full set of shots as recommended by my vet... just to be safe, really.

Cheers and thanks again! Regardless of what I already knew, your feedback WAS helpful! If anything it confirms I'm not an idiot dog owner. LOL

I just noticed that your location is in Ontario, If you're in Toronto you should check out when hounds fly for puppy classes. That's where I went with Tucker. It was great!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I just noticed that your location is in Ontario, If you're in Toronto you should check out when hounds fly for puppy classes. That's where I went with Tucker. It was great!
Thank you so much! I'm in Toronto myself. I was looking into attending the Petsmart puppy classes, but since your recommendation has classes even closer to me, this is perfect! :D
 

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I just went through the exact same thing and I can't tell you how many times I posted here worried, looking for answers. I'm really neurotic about my puppy! haha

We used WeePads in our apartment since outside access was a challenge. Especially since they have tiny bladders and need to go very often as a puppy. We kept the WeePads in a specific spot on the kitchen and every time he woke up from a nap, or just got done playing, or anything like that, we would pick him up and place him on the pad and said "POTTY". It was really important to reward him every single time he used the pad or got there but just missed.

We let him free roam the apartment with us since it was so small but of course he had his accidents until he picked it up. We only put down one or two, we couldn't afford to cover the entire floor and then lean him off of it to just using a single pad. Our puppy who is now 5 1/2 picked it up by the 3rd month. An accident here or there but I would say he's been perfect for the last month or so. The only time he has an accident now is if we block his way to the pad or it's too dirty and we forgot to change it.

You will get frustrated and feel like you're doing it wrong and he isn't learning but it will definitely take time, TRUST ME. I have terrible anxiety and ADHD and I got through it. Just make sure you puppy proof your apartment before hand and praise him and give him treats when he/she does use the pad.

It's so funny because now when he uses it, we will be playing and he will randomly run out of the room and we laugh and know he's going potty.

As a side note - to save money on the pads, try to pick up poop with a paper towel instead of throwing away the whole pad. I know it sounds gross but after doing this for half a year in an apartment, the pads get expensive and you will go through them quickly. Definitely invest in odor spay for the room the pad is in. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I just went through the exact same thing and I can't tell you how many times I posted here worried, looking for answers. I'm really neurotic about my puppy! haha

We used WeePads in our apartment since outside access was a challenge. Especially since they have tiny bladders and need to go very often as a puppy. We kept the WeePads in a specific spot on the kitchen and every time he woke up from a nap, or just got done playing, or anything like that, we would pick him up and place him on the pad and said "POTTY". It was really important to reward him every single time he used the pad or got there but just missed.

We let him free roam the apartment with us since it was so small but of course he had his accidents until he picked it up. We only put down one or two, we couldn't afford to cover the entire floor and then lean him off of it to just using a single pad. Our puppy who is now 5 1/2 picked it up by the 3rd month. An accident here or there but I would say he's been perfect for the last month or so. The only time he has an accident now is if we block his way to the pad or it's too dirty and we forgot to change it.

You will get frustrated and feel like you're doing it wrong and he isn't learning but it will definitely take time, TRUST ME. I have terrible anxiety and ADHD and I got through it. Just make sure you puppy proof your apartment before hand and praise him and give him treats when he/she does use the pad.

It's so funny because now when he uses it, we will be playing and he will randomly run out of the room and we laugh and know he's going potty.

As a side note - to save money on the pads, try to pick up poop with a paper towel instead of throwing away the whole pad. I know it sounds gross but after doing this for half a year in an apartment, the pads get expensive and you will go through them quickly. Definitely invest in odor spay for the room the pad is in. :)
Hey Bekah,

thanks for sharing! It's good to read some positive experience with using WeePads :) Will you eventually be stopping their use altogether so he only goes outside?

I'm still kind of flopping about using the pads vs not. I can see advantages to both, but I'm going to try not using them to start. Hopefully she won't pee on me on the way down in the elevator XD

I hear you on the anxiety. I've suffered from it since childhood, so a lot of difficult things that only mildly to moderately affect the average person sends me over the edge with worry and panic, hehe. On that note, I'll do my best to remind myself that it's just going to take time and patience and accidents happen. Thank goodness for enzymatic cleaners, eh? ;)
 

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I have a wonderful plethora of psychological problems, and I can train a dog perfectly fine. Usually it's in situations like the present (where I'm house sitting for my boss and have not only our Husky, but seven other dogs here; not even getting paid... yay...) that make me really start to feel the pressure.
 
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