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Hi,
I am going to look at dogs this weekend at a rescue home. They say on the website that they do home checks, is this likely to happen? I've got a couple of friends who have said that they never had to have home checks. I'm just curious because I live in a flat and worried I'll get rejected,

Thanks
 

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Some rescues do it, some don't. Those that do may or may not do it all the time.

You should be upfront about the fact that you live in an apartment, IMO, and about the size of it. Not all dogs are suited to living in an apartment and the shelter staff may have an idea of the indoor activity level of specific dogs, especially if they are fostered.

My first dog's breeder did a home check because we lived in the same city- at the time we were a 4 person family living in a fairly small 2 bedroom apartment without a yard and they still approved us because the breed we were looking at was well suited for apartments.

The place I got my rescue dog did a home check as well specifically because she wouldn't have done well in a small apartment without a yard. At the time we were living in a duplex 3 bedroom apartment with a medium sized yard, so they were OK with it.

I wouldn't stress out too much about home checks; they may or may not happen but if they do as long as your apartment isn't actually unsuitable for the specific dog you're looking at it shouldn't be a problem.

Some places will refuse to place dogs in homes without a yard or in apartments, but usually that is with good reason (for example, a lot of border collie breed rescues I've seen do this; I've seen this to be true mostly of breed rescues catering to breeds that don't do well in homes without yards).
 

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I recently adopted Sonic.
I was FREAKED about the home check because, a) my original formal application was rejected (no fence) and my house is very tiny and old (wooden cottage) and b) she was matching us up to a young border collie.

Turns out the 'home visit' was out in our yard (small front yard only). She chatted with my husband, I was too nervous and had gone for a 'walk' to calm down. I arrived at the end of her visit. When she saw what my 'walk' consisted of (around the lake, the lake is visible) she looked pretty sure we could handle exercise needs without a fence.

There was no indoor inspection, but since Sonic was delivered to our home, there was a visit in the traditional sense of the term, as in she came in and sat in our living room for a bit to get him settled in. This was fun and pleasant.

Be VERY honest about your home, and your habits, experience, etc.. Do this 'in person'. Many rescues skim through applications and reject based on easilly quantified criteria (no fence--no dog).

My husband did not take 'no' for an answer and telephoned her (he's 'good with people', me, not so much), had a friendly chat about our life-style (lots of daily walks, long time gsd owners, etc..) and obviously changed her mind from no dog to placing us with a high activity dog.

One thing to keep in mind if you don't have a fence or yard (flat) is that your dog needs to be comfortable and acceptably well-behaved from day one. Your new dog will need frequent leashed walks in public spaces multiple times per day.
That doesn't mean he needs to be perfect, or even good at these things, he just needs be tolerable and to tolerate the public spaces where he gets his exercise and potty breaks. Not all rescued dogs can handle that, some have very deep fear issues and need a fenced yard where they can potty and exercise in a safe low key environment, so honesty is important. Some dogs really do need a fenced yard.

Sorry about the long winded answer, but the whole idea of a 'home inspection' had me so freaked out (so much so that I now know I would never allow one to happen) but it didn't, and everything happened on a friendly and casual basis.
 

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I am not sure where you are located but for most of the rescues in Minnesota a home visit is required. When I adopted my puppy they did a home check. As others have stated just be honest.

I volunteer with two rescues as a home visit volunteer and we are mostly looking at the yard or suitable place to exercise the dog. We also look at the condition of the house both inside and out not so much looking at any messes-- we are all human, but to make sure it is a safe environment for a pet. And we have only ever rejected one person after their home visit as they were not willing to make changes to their fence that would ensure the safety of the dog.
 

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I have 3 rescue dogs and had home checks for all 3. It's never anything crazy. I was terrified of what they would find fault with, but honestly, they are mostly checking to make sure they aren't placing the dog into a hoarder type situation or setting the dog up to fail in a situation in which it won't be happy. My house doesn't have a fenced in yard and I have 2 Pitties. As long as they feel you can handle the exercise needs (we live 100 yards from a dog park) they will generally take that into account. But definitely be honest with them about where you live, rescues will take that into account and find you a dog which is good for flat living. If it eases your mind you can often find checklists online that rescues use for home checks to give you an idea of what they might be looking for. Hope this helps and good luck!


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