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I'm sure anyone with a hound is a familiar with this story, but up until this dog I'd only had spaniels primarily and all my dogs were raised from puppyhood which made consistent, firm training a bit easier. I have a very sweet and wonderful and rescue dog of indeterminate breeding -- but best guess is a hound/spaniel/lab mix (around 30lbs), he's around 4 years old. Neutered, fairly beta but INDEPENDENT. He definitely wants to make everyone happy, but I have tried everything under the sun to keep this @*(#% dog in the yard and nothing has worked. He doesn't go off leash except in completely contained areas, but we recently moved to a new place with a big yard and another dog with a fence that has holes every which way. For the first month or so he mostly stayed in the yard and only go out when two gates were left open simultaneously. Now he's gotten a lot bolder, and even though the other dog is a total shadow dog and never leaves, he has found every cat hole and secret escape route (despite my constant efforts of patching the fence) and he just RUNS. He's not even chasing anything or a scent, he just sees an opportunity and goes -- for hours. He does NOT come wandering back eventually. The only way I get him back is that he is very people oriented and will immediately run up to any stranger he sees (or leap in their car!) and they will grab him and return him. I know he just sees it as a game, and at his rescue he was kept on a chain constantly which I don't want to do. He gets plenty of walks and attention and stimulation, but nothing works. Neighborhood rules and expense prohibit me from putting up an entirely new fence without any holes, so I have finally ordered an invisible fence as a second line of defense with the existing fence (which would be great if he weren't able to fit through all the cat holes that I can't keep up with).

Do folks think, with proper training on the fence, that this will keep him in? He won't ever be left out unattended..and I'm super ambivalent about it, I don't like the idea of the electric shock at all but at this point I just don't know how to keep him safe and I'm terrified he's going to get hit by a car one of these days. Everything I read, and the pound when I picked him up from his latest escapade, said an electric fence never works with hounds but I'm just not sure what else to do. And other people say it works perfectly -- so I'd just liek some opinions and advice on it all, or other suggestions!
 

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Using electric fences and the like isn't something your going to be recommended on this forum.

I think proper training without the electric shock is the way to go. If he's out in the yard keep him on lead and stay with him, he should be left unattended knowing he's an escapee.

Plus electric fences aren't a solid barrier so if a dog is determined enough and being a hound I doubt he'd stop running, dogs can just run right through it. I would recommend them for any breed of dog.

If you can't afford to make a new fence and dig down into the ground and lay chicken wire so they can't dig down then you'll just have to supervise him when outside and keep him on a long line.
 
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Invisible fences are a bit of a misnomer, they're a training tool not a fence. If used as a training tool they can be used effectively. If used as a fence they're almost never effective.
 

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I'm not a huge fan of them, but I think in your situation, and how you plan to use it, it may work and be a good idea. I know many people on here are completely against any sort of physical consequence, but i do think there are times in which it is needed for the safety of the animal. Much better a quick shock than hit by a car.

You can't put up a new fence but there is a fence there, so I think as reinforcement it may work. It's also not as if you plan to leave him out there by himself. Just because he's a hound does NOT mean it won't work. True, they do tend to be tougher and more able to run through, but it doesn't automatically mean he will. At this point it's obviously too dangerous to have him out there unless on a leash. I would give it a try and see how he reacts.
 

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I have the exact same problem. The thing is the very first time your dog got loose it was so much fun and so rewarding that it's just instilled. Very, very heard to undo the conditioning that did.

My solution with my dog is to just never let him outside off leash :( He gets two short calm walks a day and two or three trips a week to the dog park. He doesn't get to hang out in the yard anymore. Maybe when his recall rate improves. I'm working on that, but I don't think it will be up to 100% any time soon.

The problem with electric fences is that eventually he'll learn that the best way to make the shock stop is to just force through it. You're hoping that he'll learn to turn around and come back when the shock starts. But he might very well learn that the shock stops when you just keep going forward. Couple that with the fact that once he's out the shock will stop AND he'll be free to explore, then you've got an even worse problem to deal with.
 

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A dog that determined might bolt through it and deal with the pain of the shock. Not a fan of invisible fences for multiple reasons, least of which is that there are lots of dogs they just don't work with. Like someone else said you just can't let him off leash on your property.
 

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In my experience and electric fence WILL NOT hold a determined hound in. Is there any reason why you cannot properly secure your existing fence? Every once in a while I walk my fence line to make sure there are no holes or gaps.
 
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