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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there :) Im just after some advice and personal experience with dogs with allergies and feeding homemade dog food. My 4 month old puppy has a rash on her stomach. My vet has looked at her twice and now recommend to take her off beef as it could be allergies. I did some research and saw that grain free might be the best option for her as well. The people at the pet shop also agreed I brought some pet food which is suitable. Ive been doing some more research and saw that homemade pet food is another option. Is this something that has worked for other people? Thank you! Any advice is much appreciated :)
 

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Homemade is always an option but, whether raw or cooked, it's extra effort to prepare the food and, especially with cooked, you will probably need to add vitamin and mineral supplements to the food. Dogs do need some fiber so, no grain may not be the best, depends on the dog. Pumpkin ans sweet potato are good grain alternatives.

You may want to consider a raw diet for your dog, that's a bit easier to balance. Prey Model if your dog won't eat or, you don't want to feed fruits and vegetable at all, BARF if you do.

I feed Prey Model and give pumpkin, sweet potato, cooked rice and cooked oats as treats/fillers.

Even with a homemade diet, you will want to feed a small amount of kibble at least a couple of times a week to keep the dog eating kibble. It may need to for overnight at the vet or, if you board it while on vacation. Not every facility will feed homemade dog food.
 

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Homemade is always an option but, whether raw or cooked, it's extra effort to prepare the food and, especially with cooked, you will probably need to add vitamin and mineral supplements to the food. Dogs do need some fiber so, no grain may not be the best, depends on the dog. Pumpkin ans sweet potato are good grain alternatives.

You may want to consider a raw diet for your dog, that's a bit easier to balance. Prey Model if your dog won't eat or, you don't want to feed fruits and vegetable at all, BARF if you do.

I feed Prey Model and give pumpkin, sweet potato, cooked rice and cooked oats as treats/fillers.

Even with a homemade diet, you will want to feed a small amount of kibble at least a couple of times a week to keep the dog eating kibble. It may need to for overnight at the vet or, if you board it while on vacation. Not every facility will feed homemade dog food.

Thank you! I had a look at the Prey Model and BARF quickly but will have a better look into them tonight. Do you cook the pumpkin and sweet potato or leave it raw? Thanks for your advice! That gives me another area to look into :)
 

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I would definitely look into the raw diets. There are a lot of benefits (healthy teeth, beautiful skin and coat, small and infrequent poops, more energy) AND a raw diet is perfect for dogs with allergies and itchy skin because you can control exactly what your dog eats. Happy research :)
 

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I partially cook the sweet potatoes, enough that I can easily peel them. Pumpkin I feed raw but, these are wolfdogs, with the jaw strength and teeth to handle breaking open whole pumpkins and, eating them - toys and treats all in one for them. I'd cook it or, use canned, solid pack for smaller or less powerful mouths.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I would definitely look into the raw diets. There are a lot of benefits (healthy teeth, beautiful skin and coat, small and infrequent poops, more energy) AND a raw diet is perfect for dogs with allergies and itchy skin because you can control exactly what your dog eats. Happy research :)
Thanks! One of my parents German Shepards is on a raw diet because she gets itchy skins so I'm definitely going to try this with mine :)
 

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I partially cook the sweet potatoes, enough that I can easily peel them. Pumpkin I feed raw but, these are wolfdogs, with the jaw strength and teeth to handle breaking open whole pumpkins and, eating them - toys and treats all in one for them. I'd cook it or, use canned, solid pack for smaller or less powerful mouths.
Thank you! Unfortunately I've never been able to find canned pumpkin where I live but I can definitely cook it. Thank you so much for your advice. Im definitely going to give raw food a go!
 

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I'ts usually in the baking row at the grocery store. Just make sure it's SOLID PACK, not Pie Filling. Pie filling has sugar, spices and other things added.
 

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Thank you! Unfortunately I've never been able to find canned pumpkin where I live but I can definitely cook it. Thank you so much for your advice. Im definitely going to give raw food a go!
If you go with commercial raw, its still processed, most have other unnecessary ingredients as well. Same concept as kibble. Commercial is commercial. If you go with prey model, the most natural raw, do your research. Its easy once you get it, but you do need to know how to get started, and then how to feed it correctly.
 

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Grain-free dog food sounds like a winning innovation for dogs, and it’s all over the pet store shelves. Dry dog food, wet food, puppy food: they can all be grain-free, along with your dog treats. After all, it’s impossible to imagine our dogs’ wild ancestors going crazy over a field of corn or wheat. Why feed our dogs unnecessary ingredients they don’t naturally hunger after? Should we not free them from the shackles of common grains?!
 

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Yes, corn is bad but, the grain replaces the stomach and bowel contents the wild canines would eat, they do need some carbs and fiber in the diet not a lot but, some. Even in the wild a wolf will nibble at ripe berries and, they do eat the contents of the stomach and intestines, or crop and gizzard if it's a bird. Their prey are grazers and rodents mostly, so they get grain, seeds, nuts and, fiber that way.

I do feed prey model but, I am able to feed whole animals sometimes so, they do get that. When I can't feed whole animals, they get cooked rice and a small helping of kibble to replace the plant matter content of a whole animal diet.
 

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Grain-free dog food sounds like a winning innovation for dogs, and it’s all over the pet store shelves. Dry dog food, wet food, puppy food: they can all be grain-free, along with your dog treats. After all, it’s impossible to imagine our dogs’ wild ancestors going crazy over a field of corn or wheat. Why feed our dogs unnecessary ingredients they don’t naturally hunger after? Should we not free them from the shackles of common grains?!
You're forgetting that in the wild, canines are predators and, do eat the stomach and, intestinal contents of their prey. That might be grasses, grains, seeds, fruit, whatever the prey eats. As domestic pets, they don't have that option so, their food needs to provide a suitable equivalent to the partially digested plant matter they would eat naturally.

I do agree that corn and wheat are not the way to go but, there needs to be something there to replace the plant matter portion of a wild diet.
 
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