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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my Grandparents have a dog named Lucy, she is a miniature Australian Shepard, and she has waaaaay too much energy. They can't afford training because she just got hit by a car and lost her leg... but they need help. She has already ripped up their couch and shoes and everything. And yes, she is not a puppy. Any ideas on training???
btw: she won't sit still for training you can probably guess.
 

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Hi, well in general a healthy dog has a good amount of energy but Australian shepherds have A LOT of energy because they are herding dogs, ripping out stuff is just a sign of anxiety and stress, if you want her to stop the behavior you have to work her physically and mentally, good long walks with activity's like running or biking are a need. For the mentally part, try to train her, at first in obedience and then you can try to teach her agility, fly ball or something similar. I know it sounds like a lot, more because is your grandparents dog, but you will see the change, anyway if you really can't do all of this try to work on a really good recall, take her out on a long line and play with a ball or something similar to try to burn energy. Something important is:
Hiperactive dogs don't exist, if someone tells you " you should put the dog on meds" it means they're are just getting the dog high.
I hope this helps, if you have any questions let me know
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi, well in general a healthy dog has a good amount of energy but Australian shepherds have A LOT of energy because they are herding dogs, ripping out stuff is just a sign of anxiety and stress, if you want her to stop the behavior you have to work her physically and mentally, good long walks with activity's like running or biking are a need. For the mentally part, try to train her, at first in obedience and then you can try to teach her agility, fly ball or something similar. I know it sounds like a lot, more because is your grandparents dog, but you will see the change, anyway if you really can't do all of this try to work on a really good recall, take her out on a long line and play with a ball or something similar to try to burn energy. Something important is:
Hiperactive dogs don't exist, if someone tells you " you should put the dog on meds" it means they're are just getting the dog high.
I hope this helps, if you have any questions let me know
Wow, @Green_wolfie, this is really helpful! I wasn't expecting someone to reply with such a long response... They already throw ball and go on long walks, so do you think hiring a trainer would be the first choice? Or them training her themselves? (I mean they are getting older since they are my GPs.)
 

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Wow, @Green_wolfie, this is really helpful! I wasn't expecting someone to reply with such a long response... They already throw ball and go on long walks, so do you think hiring a trainer would be the first choice? Or them training her themselves? (I mean they are getting older since they are my GPs.)
[/QUOT
Wow, @Green_wolfie, this is really helpful! I wasn't expecting someone to reply with such a long response... They already throw ball and go on long walks, so do you think hiring a trainer would be the first choice? Or them training her themselves? (I mean they are getting older since they are my GPs.)
This is weird coming from a dog trainer but i prefer, owner's training their own dog Becuse for dogs (and some humans) training is bonding. I have train dogs who end liking more being with me, then with their owners and i think that's sad for the owners. So if you're grandparents can't train her because of their age, you can hire a trainer, if they think they can do it, go ahead... Also ¿How long and often are the walks? Whenever you're hire a trainer or you/ or your grandparents train her, try to do a really good energy burn before starting, working with a calm/no anxious dog is easier at least for now. Important: Get really inform of training methods, tools etc. Before starting to hire or train the dog. There's A LOT of training methods and some can't be abusive and others don't work for all dogs and you be hurting the dog and waisting time and money. Hope it's help
 

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I have two 'high energy' dogs and have found that while ensuring they get enough opportunity for appropriate physical exercise, it is the mental 'exercise' that truly satisfies them and tires them out.

Suggest looking into 'brain games' for dogs, they don't require a lot of physical exercise from the owner, but are often a lot of fun and mentally stimulating for the dog.
10 Fun Brain Games For Dogs - Puppy Leaks
Brain Games For Dogs | Battersea Dogs & Cats Home
 

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I have two 'high energy' dogs and have found that while ensuring they get enough opportunity for appropriate physical exercise, it is the mental 'exercise' that truly satisfies them and tires them out.

Suggest looking into 'brain games' for dogs, they don't require a lot of physical exercise from the owner, but are often a lot of fun and mentally stimulating for the dog.
10 Fun Brain Games For Dogs - Puppy Leaks
Brain Games For Dogs | Battersea Dogs & Cats Home
That's true, they are really good but some of them can cause more anxiety on the dog if the dog is already anxious for the rest, they are really good, still i would take it as an addition more then a replacement of training for mentally activity's
 

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That's true, they are really good but some of them can cause more anxiety on the dog if the dog is already anxious for the rest, they are really good, still i would take it as an addition more then a replacement of training for mentally activity's
I wasn't implying that one might use 'brain games', (of which one can pick and choose which works for their dog) instead of training, but as an additional way to work with a dog to enable them build their ability to focus and use their brilliant minds.
 

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Sorry to hear about Lucy losing a leg!

There are no "quick" fixes. Training has to be done in small increments, and you have to make it fun and rewarding for the dog! And as others have said, it's both fun and helps with bonding, so I agree owner (or maybe grandson/grandaughter) is best!

Destructive behavior, like chewing up the couch and shoes is usually caused by two things. First, a lack of exercise and mind stimulation. What does a typical day look like for this dog? Does she get time outside to run and play? Does she get walked regularly? Does she get played with?

The second reason that's also pretty common is that dogs like to chew stuff. Does she have plenty of things that are okay to chew on? You didn't say how old, but young dogs especially like to chew.

I think you'll see a lot of that bad behavior disappear once she's getting adequate exercise and training.

How "trained" is she now? By that I mean, what commands will she dependable do?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Sorry to hear about Lucy losing a leg!

There are no "quick" fixes. Training has to be done in small increments, and you have to make it fun and rewarding for the dog! And as others have said, it's both fun and helps with bonding, so I agree owner (or maybe grandson/grandaughter) is best!

Destructive behavior, like chewing up the couch and shoes is usually caused by two things. First, a lack of exercise and mind stimulation. What does a typical day look like for this dog? Does she get time outside to run and play? Does she get walked regularly? Does she get played with?

The second reason that's also pretty common is that dogs like to chew stuff. Does she have plenty of things that are okay to chew on? You didn't say how old, but young dogs especially like to chew.

I think you'll see a lot of that bad behavior disappear once she's getting adequate exercise and training.

How "trained" is she now? By that I mean, what commands will she dependable do?
she has lots and lots of toys and gets time to run around freely in the yard 3-4 times a day. When they are gone they usually leave her out, but then she is okay. She is about a year and a half old, and it seems the more people around her the more destructive.
 

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she has lots and lots of toys and gets time to run around freely in the yard 3-4 times a day. When they are gone they usually leave her out, but then she is okay. She is about a year and a half old, and it seems the more people around her the more destructive.
Well, that's interesting! So more like an anxious response then.

But again, having toys and being played with are not equivalent. Puppies and even older dogs love to play WITH their people!

My dog, as a puppy, learned to fetch with upbeat, high energy, direct interaction. She would not have shown much interest in "just" the toy.

Sounds to me like maybe you OP (= original poster, in case you haven't seen that!), could help out a great deal by playing with the dog in the yard for a bit, prior to training!

Then, initially use a leash, though I typically don't with most puppies, your dog is not a small puppy and it can help you show her what you want. All positive and upbeat, of course, just some gentle guidance!

Use treats for sure, something the dog really loves. Start small, and the incrementally get to the response you're after.

Say you're teaching a sit (which most dogs already know, but just as an example. First step, and disregard this if you already get it, is to lure the dog into a sit by pinning the reward between you thumb and your palm, and showing the dog so they get and are interested in the scent, then move your somewhat closer hand upward and a little back toward the dog, causing them to sit, then reward with the treat by opening your hand.

Anyway, the food at this point in training may seem like a bribe, and to some extent it is, you're building engagement. The key is, you incrementally up you criteria for success and reward!

Anyway, as I said initially, there really are no short cuts! Exercise first and foremost, then short training bursts, then play works best!

Your Grandparents can engage the pup in the backyard, even without moving much. But just giving her toys and leaving her outside won't really ever work.
 
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