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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi! My name is Josh, and I am very soon going to be the proud parent of the most adorable 8 month old Pit Bull rescue. Nice being on the site. I still have a few days until his homecoming, but I was wanting to get advice and opinions on his welcome home presents? So far I have a large Serta dog bed/couch (spoiled already, I know), an extra large/strong Mammoth dental rope, extra large water bowl, large food bowl, and matching nylon leash and collar with engraved tag. Going to pick up a large kong later. What are your thoughts wonderful people? It did feel kinda hard looking for toys that would be strong enough to survive him when he is older. Most I found were for working and toy dogs.
 

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Sounds like you have the basics covered. Post some pics for us. As much as I love the small breeds, always had a soft spot for pitties. Good on you for rescuing one.
 

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Hi! My name is Josh, and I am very soon going to be the proud parent of the most adorable 8 month old Pit Bull rescue. Nice being on the site. I still have a few days until his homecoming, but I was wanting to get advice and opinions on his welcome home presents? So far I have a large Serta dog bed/couch (spoiled already, I know), an extra large/strong Mammoth dental rope, extra large water bowl, large food bowl, and matching nylon leash and collar with engraved tag. Going to pick up a large kong later. What are your thoughts wonderful people? It did feel kinda hard looking for toys that would be strong enough to survive him when he is older. Most I found were for working and toy dogs.
Is he home by now?
What my rescue AmStaff mix loved: squeaky ball! And, what she also absolutely adores is a green pig with blue polka dots that has a squeaker which is sounding like a pig!
She is not nearly 9 month old, have had her for 3 months and made it through 10 (if I remember correctly) soft/plush toys, she just loves to rip them apart.

Also, in regards to the dog bed. Don't use it at first, at least as long as you're not sure about him being totally housebroken in your house/apartment. It would be sad to have it messed up. Our girl also tried to take her bed apart in the beginning, so she now has 2 old blankets for her crate (which she doesn't eat and are washed more easily) and the dog bed for the kitchen area (she sleeps in her crate in our room, she is not 100% house broken yet).

Enjoy this guy and make sure to post some pictures! :)
 

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I agree with the squeaky toy!! My pitbull puppy (4 months) LOVES anything that squeaks.

I also got this for her:
https://www.kongcompany.com/products/for-dogs/rubber-toys/classic-rubber-toys/classic-goodie-bone/
She has the smaller puppy version, her kibble fits perfectly inside. Not sure how big your 8 month old is so you will have to choose the appropriate size (and double check your dog's kibble to see if it can fit into the little grooves). I find that dog interactive/puzzle toys are good for my pup because it helps tire her out and makes her work for her food. There are a TON of great interactive toys out there. This might website might be helpful:
Pitlandia: Top 10 Food Dispensing Dog Toys


I also just recently purchased this:
Pet Supplies : Pet Toy Balls : Pet Qwerks Irresistaball Treat Ball : Amazon.com
But some of the reviews said that only small kibble/treats fit.

Congrats on your new puppy! Please update us and show us some pics! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Yay wonderful people! Gonna be a few more days until I can take him home because of my house's seller needing to go out of town for work. Around the 25th. Can't stop thinking about him (ToT)

As far as toys go, I was a little hesitant getting anything that he'll destroy in a couple hours, but I'll most certainly look into squeaky toys now!

With the bed, I can wash the casing. If he wants to be a brat and destroy it, he'll have to learn to cope with towels like you said. I can see where holding off on it at first is beneficial. Would hate for that bed to be a victim in housetraining or retraining.

The picture doesn't capture his full cuteness but it will have to do
 

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Oh I forgot to add that rubber "chuck it!" Balls are pretty durable. The ones that come with the "chuck it!" Stick is the fuzzy one that I don't recommend.
 

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Oh I forgot to add that rubber "chuck it!" Balls are pretty durable. The ones that come with the "chuck it!" Stick is the fuzzy one that I don't recommend.
we had a rubber chuck it (think rubber but hollow) that stayed very well in tacked and our heeler loved it, his favorite ball, then we got a three month old shepherd mix puppy who saw he liked it so much so she managed to cracked it, now our heeler hates it as it pinches his tongue when he grabs it :( i don't even know how she could if he couldn't. Now we get them solid rubber bouncy balls from the dollar store that are similar size to tennis balls the seem very durable.
 

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we had a rubber chuck it (think rubber but hollow) that stayed very well in tacked and our heeler loved it, his favorite ball, then we got a three month old shepherd mix puppy who saw he liked it so much so she managed to cracked it, now our heeler hates it as it pinches his tongue when he grabs it :( i don't even know how she could if he couldn't. Now we get them solid rubber bouncy balls from the dollar store that are similar size to tennis balls the seem very durable.
Oh no!!! good to know!!! I will keep an eye out as my puppy grows. She's still small but who knows with Pitbull mouths lol
 

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As silly as it sounds, be careful with squeak toys. I've seen dogs develop sort of a prey drive in the sense that they are trying to kill the squeak toy instead of play with it.
 

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True I know my dogs are fairly calm and would never hurt another dog or human I'm not willing to test with cats just because if they don't like them I don't want to deal with the results but true especially with pitbulls (no judgement just what ive seen at dog parks) or dogs with high aggression levels it can cause them to get agressive when a dog squeals and I wouldn't suggest rope with angry dogs either as it stimulate they prey drive like the are fighting over prey. I have seen many pitbulls attack another dog from getting to overexcited. This is probably due to bad owner and bad training but make sure he gets well socialized and when he does play he doesn't get to rough with it, most people won be happy with a pity playing rough with their dog.
 

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True I know my dogs are fairly calm and would never hurt another dog or human I'm not willing to test with cats just because if they don't like them I don't want to deal with the results but true especially with pitbulls (no judgement just what ive seen at dog parks) or dogs with high aggression levels it can cause them to get agressive when a dog squeals and I wouldn't suggest rope with angry dogs either as it stimulate they prey drive like the are fighting over prey. I have seen many pitbulls attack another dog from getting to overexcited. This is probably due to bad owner and bad training but make sure he gets well socialized and when he does play he doesn't get to rough with it, most people won be happy with a pity playing rough with their dog.
Yes, rope pull is another one.

I have a special spot for pitties, love them. But it's a dog under a microscope unfortunately, and you don't want to chance unwittingly instilling something being ok when it's actually not. Pitbull owners especially need to learn to read their dogs body language, find out what's good or bad - know when their dog is playing or being a little more serious. Watch their eyes when pulling on a rope, do they have intensity, they don't want to let go - and are you teaching them not to let go...?

I'm not a trainer or a behaviorist, take it for what it's worth.
 

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Yes pit bulls are a fun breed if trained properly. The only problem I have with the ropes is that it can bring out their instinctive aggression that they sometimes develop by thinking that pulling is a good thing. This doesn't happen to all pits but it is basically up to the owner to ensure that the behavior is in check.
 

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I found with my dog who was always over excited about literally everything the rope was good to teach him how to control himself a little more especially during play time, I sposed it would work with any toy but the rope o found easiest as it allowed him to get excited and grab the toy without accidentally grabbing my. Hes not a pitbull but hes a heeler that didn't know how to let go of toys very well and had one issue he grabbed a childs frisbee as they petted him and didn't want to give it back. It's also a good tool to teach a let go or drop it command as you can keep fingers out the way. I'm not a behaviorist or a trainer but worked with my dog through some minor issues (not yet his major crazyness around other dogs, he's all noise not aggression.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Some of you, especially Jagger, already know I rethought taking home a pittie and decided it may not have been a good decision considering where I am in life. At least not yet. I still love them, but I talked it over with the shelter and they have me set up to take home an Australian cattle mix.

With squeaky toys, I think that socialization plays a bigger part teaching a dog the difference between what is and isn't a toy. Others that are just stubborn and want to play keep away.

As far as the rope goes, it really falls to fighting any dog's naturally impulsive nature I think. But I can easily see how one of those pitties who seemingly snap, inside of their blocky head they thought it was all just a game. Had a chance to meet a police k9 and it was incredible yet a little bit sad. The dog seemed to only exist for that minute of playing with his rope toy as reward for finding drugs. Sooo cute and handsome too.
 

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Though i think its sad that police dogs are taught to be so obsessive about a toy or a rope, all dogs want and need a job to do to feel fulfilled and useful, like with cattle dogs they want to herd unless you train the not to at an early age or give them another job or another way to exert that energy. MOST dogs want to aim to please the owner, German shepherd have protection instincts which makes them such great police dogs, and beagles where bred to follow the scent, i know a beagle who doesn't want to do anything but follow the smells, mainly food smells, but he wont play ball he wont play with squeaky toys just food and smells. and i say most dogs want to please you, i have a German shepherd mix who appears she is deliberately trying to get under your skin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Though i think its sad that police dogs are taught to be so obsessive about a toy or a rope, all dogs want and need a job to do to feel fulfilled and useful, like with cattle dogs they want to herd unless you train the not to at an early age or give them another job or another way to exert that energy. MOST dogs want to aim to please the owner, German shepherd have protection instincts which makes them such great police dogs, and beagles where bred to follow the scent, i know a beagle who doesn't want to do anything but follow the smells, mainly food smells, but he wont play ball he wont play with squeaky toys just food and smells. and i say most dogs want to please you, i have a German shepherd mix who appears she is deliberately trying to get under your skin.
Kinda hard to notice, but you can see they thrive on doing a good job. Addicted to it maybe. They probably want to play and eat all the time sure but they still love working.I swear they're more like people than we give them credit for.

From my experience it seems like herding instincts vary between each dog. Friend's corgi would rather be a puppy it seemed, or a border collie that just wants to have fun. If I successfully adopt my Aussi mix and he takes to training, I definitely have to see what he would like to do. There's even a good dog course nearby for agility and maybe flyball.

I don't even know the first thing about a scent driven hound besides the stories of how their tracking instinct practically overrides almost all of their training. I do get you on those special snowflakes, cousin had a German Shepherd mix I swear you would never know went to puppy school. Gorgeous and fun, but a pain in the rear.
 
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