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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am lost. I have tried everything I can find on Google, vets advise and still no luck.

I have a 2 year old staffy cross, I have had her since she was 17 month old. I got her basically un trained. Basically the people I got her off lied. They said she was speyed and trained etc, she wasn't. They were selling her for a mere £40 and then gave her to me for FREE.

Anyway, I got her speyed etc but it became clear she had some sort of separation anxiety. She would follow me everywhere, cry if I shut a door, howl when I went out till I got back even if someone else was with her, she would chew things (even managed to chew through a door!) And worst of all scratch till she bled. I took her to vets and they put her on tablets. But they haven't worked. The vets are at a whim.

My main problem is though she seems untrainable. She knows her basic commands 'sit' 'lay' 'speak' 'paw' 'bed' 'stay' 'out' 'walkies' etc but will not listen unless there is a treat. I take her for walk after walk and she still messes in the house (but only when I'm not looking, mainly within 5 minutes of me going to bed, and she's smart if I get up she waits.) Today I took her for a 2 hours long walk, yet she came in went upstairs and pooed in my sons bedroom. Tonight I put her outside for 30 minutes, went upstairs after for a wash and she had pooed downstairs in the kitchen. Even though she had emptied her bowels outside both times.

She doesn't listen when been told off, doesn't care I've tried it all. She jumps all over people who visit. She comes on my bed once we are sleeping even though she knows she's not allowed and has her own bed in the room. She jumps on furniture. If I tell her a command without a treat she asks like she doesn't know it. She literally doesn't listen to me ever.

She even got banned from dog training! I have tried one to one dog training with no availe. She's speyed and vaccinated. She's on food the vet recommended I've done everything I've been told to do.

I'm lost. I love her to bits but she's just too much! Help!
 

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I don't know that I have any real advice, but I wanted you to know you're not alone, and it's perfectly understandable that you're frustrated. My Winston has issues with being destructive when left at home. I cannot leave him in the house because he's already chewed up couch cushions, destroyed pillows, and chewed areas of the wall and door/window frames. He has two other dogs at home with him who are perfectly content and always have been, but it makes no difference. I am fortunate enough to have a "Winston proof" room in my horse barn where I can put him. He still chews up the old mattress and cushions I put in there for them to sleep on (the floor is concrete), and the doors are covered with muddy paw prints, so he's obviously looking a way out when I'm not there, but at least he AND my house are safe.
I've gotten him a crate, but have been pretty slack about training him to it and enforcing it as his "proper" place to stay. He's sleeping on the end of my bed right BESIDE where the crate is right now. And I'm letting him...because I spoil him rotten.

My best friend has a female APBT whom she sort of rescued when she was a couple of years old. She was a stray who wasn't spayed, looked like she'd had a litter of pups, and was positive for heartworms. She's a very sweet dog (to people at least), but my friend has to keep her crated in the house when she's gone because she will get destructive. The dog lived outside for most of her life, but has adjusted pretty well. They are in the process of fencing their backyard (this is a new house for them), and then she will get to be outside more. But yeah, even as sweet and mild-mannered as she is (she's about 10 years old now, so has mellowed), she obviously has some separation anxiety/destructive tendencies too.

Can you crate train your girl? Is that an option? I'm not sure how to go about it with a dog who suffers severe separation anxiety. Like I said, I'm hesitant with Winston for that very reason.
 

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Welcome to Dog Forum! Sounds as though you have your hands full!

The Training and Behavior Stickies contains numerous threads with excellent training information. I'd suggest you look through them when you have time. Specifically, I'd recommend these
House Training How Tos
Thoughts on training with food
Separation anxiety
Impulse Control and Calmness
4 quadrants of operant conditioning
Finding a Trainer, Behavior Consultant, or Behaviorist - I'd suggest finding a veterinary behaviorist (or equivalent in the UK) for a consultation regarding the separation anxiety. It's a difficult thing to treat. I've also heard very good things about Malena DiMartino-Price's protocol (book, web site).

With training, one thing to keep in mind is that you want to focus on what you want her to do. If there is something you don't want her to do (e.g., jump on guests), rather than trying to stop that behavior, decide what you want her to do instead and train that behavior.

Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I don't know that I have any real advice, but I wanted you to know you're not alone, and it's perfectly understandable that you're frustrated. My Winston has issues with being destructive when left at home. I cannot leave him in the house because he's already chewed up couch cushions, destroyed pillows, and chewed areas of the wall and door/window frames. He has two other dogs at home with him who are perfectly content and always have been, but it makes no difference. I am fortunate enough to have a "Winston proof" room in my horse barn where I can put him. He still chews up the old mattress and cushions I put in there for them to sleep on (the floor is concrete), and the doors are covered with muddy paw prints, so he's obviously looking a way out when I'm not there, but at least he AND my house are safe.
I've gotten him a crate, but have been pretty slack about training him to it and enforcing it as his "proper" place to stay. He's sleeping on the end of my bed right BESIDE where the crate is right now. And I'm letting him...because I spoil him rotten.

My best friend has a female APBT whom she sort of rescued when she was a couple of years old. She was a stray who wasn't spayed, looked like she'd had a litter of pups, and was positive for heartworms. She's a very sweet dog (to people at least), but my friend has to keep her crated in the house when she's gone because she will get destructive. The dog lived outside for most of her life, but has adjusted pretty well. They are in the process of fencing their backyard (this is a new house for them), and then she will get to be outside more. But yeah, even as sweet and mild-mannered as she is (she's about 10 years old now, so has mellowed), she obviously has some separation anxiety/destructive tendencies too.

Can you crate train your girl? Is that an option? I'm not sure how to go about it with a dog who suffers severe separation anxiety. Like I said, I'm hesitant with Winston for that very reason.

Crate training is my next option I think. The vets say she is too old to start that though but I think anything is worth a try!


Thanks for your input x
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Welcome to Dog Forum! Sounds as though you have your hands full!

The Training and Behavior Stickies contains numerous threads with excellent training information. I'd suggest you look through them when you have time. Specifically, I'd recommend these
House Training How Tos
Thoughts on training with food
Separation anxiety
Impulse Control and Calmness
4 quadrants of operant conditioning
Finding a Trainer, Behavior Consultant, or Behaviorist - I'd suggest finding a veterinary behaviorist (or equivalent in the UK) for a consultation regarding the separation anxiety. It's a difficult thing to treat. I've also heard very good things about Malena DiMartino-Price's protocol (book, web site).

With training, one thing to keep in mind is that you want to focus on what you want her to do. If there is something you don't want her to do (e.g., jump on guests), rather than trying to stop that behavior, decide what you want her to do instead and train that behavior.

Good luck!

Hi thanks you! I will look through all that and try different things! X
 
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