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Discussion Starter #1
I may be crazy but I have this notebook and im planning EVERYTHING to do with my new puppy. I have schedules for each week until she gains her adult bladder, I have lists of things I need before and will need and have bought almost everything even though she is still 6 weeks away from coming home.

Anyhow.. I want to make a list of all the topics of her "lessons" (time I have set apart to teach her things using clicker or other positive reinforcement). I also want to make a list with detail on everything I need to teach her "through doing". Here is what I have so far;

Learn Through Doing
- Go Pee
- that mouthing is bad, but have to research info on that
- that chasing cats is bad, but have to research that one too
~I was thinking of seeing how she naturally ends up telling me she wants out, and changing it to bells or something only if it ends up needing changing, but maybe this is a bad plan?

Lessons
- Crate games and any thing else crate related to make it a happy place
- sit, lay (I know I have a habit of using down like get down so I don't want her to get mixed up), stay, come, attention
- Crate ( the word)

Incase it matters, she is 3/4 border collie and 1/4 corgi

Also I will be teaching her lots more "tricks" when she has the important stuff out the way because I think it will be a fun thing for us to do together. but I want to make sure I get everything covered that is important. I have contacted someone regarding puppy classes but due to the timing they wont be until January and I get her at 8.5 weeks old nov 26 (2nd shots are nov 30). I also plan from there to enroll in whatever I can with the club, again just for fun. Very much looking forward to enrolling in agility :)
 

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Good luck. Just remember, sometimes things don't go to plan and we may have to alter our strategies. Patience, flexibility, kindness and understanding are some of the trainer's best tools.
 

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for the beginning the only thing my dogs learned was that their name means "something awesome happens so i should follow this human that said my name", "doing your business outside means that human will throw a party" and "if the human points on the blanket, and I go there I get cuddles and yummies".
Don't overdo it with training.
the first weeks should mainly be bonding with your new dog and exploring the world together.

both of my dogs reacted better on bodylanguage in the beginning and it is good for them to know this simple signlanguage, since some dogs get hearing impaired when they get older. I accompanied all my commands with a specific hand sign.
I can use what ever command i want, when it'S the right intonation and I use the right hand sign.
 

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Mouthing is not bad, it is how they learn bite inhibition. Mouthing and hurting you is bad. If you are playing with a young puppy mouthing is ok, just stop play and turn your back immediately mouthing gets rough. Depending on your dog, you may want to squeal in pain, but I have heard BC's are sensitive (never had one) so be careful not to scare your puppy, you just want to demonstrate that roughness = you hurt and play stopping for a while.
Also as soon as she has had all her shots (before if you can find a good puppy group or know nice vaccinated dogs) get her interacting with other dogs. Then she learns to be social and how rough she can be with other dogs.
I still let my dog use her mouth (very gently) when playing. But that is personal choice, when you choose to phase out mouthing is when you give your dog something else to chew on instead of you.
When my dog was spayed and fell asleep on my lap I moved a little, it really hurt her and she was still loopy from the medicine, her teeth went right for my face, and gently grazed my cheek, no injury. With no bite inhibition, things could have been really bad. It is soooo important to teach good bite inhibition.

Another thing to add to your list. Exposure, to as many different things as possible while she is young, gradually increasing noises (with lots of cc) cars, trucks, stores, kids, visitors. People of different ages and group sizes, the list is endless. A young puppy is far more accepting of weird things (introduced in the right way) than an older dog.

Personally I wouldn't work on cat chasing until she is older. We only worked on potty training, her name, recall, bite inhibition, socialization, crate, sit and maximum exposure in the first few months. Impulse control for a young puppy is tough, and there is plenty to do even without that. Depending on your dogs personality and progress, you can introduce simple impulse control excercises at 4-6 months.

Have fun with your puppy!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
for the beginning the only thing my dogs learned was that their name means "something awesome happens so i should follow this human that said my name", "doing your business outside means that human will throw a party" and "if the human points on the blanket, and I go there I get cuddles and yummies".
Don't overdo it with training.
the first weeks should mainly be bonding with your new dog and exploring the world together.

both of my dogs reacted better on bodylanguage in the beginning and it is good for them to know this simple signlanguage, since some dogs get hearing impaired when they get older. I accompanied all my commands with a specific hand sign.
I can use what ever command i want, when it'S the right intonation and I use the right hand sign.
Thank you for this, it takes a lot of stress off actually lol. And I plan to use hand signals with my commands too.
 

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Mouthing is not bad, it is how they learn bite inhibition. Mouthing and hurting you is bad. If you are playing with a young puppy mouthing is ok, just stop play and turn your back immediately mouthing gets rough.
Okay, that makes a good point. Sounds like an easy enough structure to follow!

Also as soon as she has had all her shots (before if you can find a good puppy group or know nice vaccinated dogs) get her interacting with other dogs. Then she learns to be social and how rough she can be with other dogs.
I actually have a list going of friends with dogs for that purpose. I was thinking of advertising online a puppy play date ( bring proof of shots) but I dnot know if that's such a good idea because I wnot know how well they handle their pup..

Another thing to add to your list. Exposure, to as many different things as possible while she is young, gradually increasing noises (with lots of cc) cars, trucks, stores, kids, visitors. People of different ages and group sizes, the list is endless. A young puppy is far more accepting of weird things (introduced in the right way) than an older dog.
Yep, I plan to bring her to see like everyone I know, I will enroll in classes ( when she is a bit older as none run right after I get her) , I plan to bring her into store and car rides too. Whatever I can think of that is safe

Personally I wouldn't work on cat chasing until she is older. We only worked on potty training, her name, recall, bite inhibition, socialization, crate, sit and maximum exposure in the first few months. Impulse control for a young puppy is tough, and there is plenty to do even without that. Depending on your dogs personality and progress, you can introduce simple impulse control excercises at 4-6 months
That sounds perfect, all things I want to work on too. I want to really focus on crate in till she is used to it since I would like to have a well behaved dog at work ( obviously I don't expect that right away, but I want to give her the best chance at it possible ) :)
 

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, but I have heard BC's are sensitive (never had one) so be careful not to scare your puppy

I cannot stress this enough! They tend to be very soft dogs! My BC puppy (14 weeks) requires VERY little "correction" as in a gentle "Heidi" or "no" for her to completely understand.

My mother-in-law yelled at her when she was peeing in the house while we were visiting, and she ran and hid under the bed and wouldn't come out for over an hour (Not pleased, she is stuck in the way she trained her dog, 20 years ago).
 

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Baths, nail trimming, and physical manipulation of the entire body is very important to teach from an early stage.
 

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Oh, with her having two strong herding breeds, exposure to things that go by very fast while having her NOT chase them is key. There is a BC who comes to the dog park, and they always have to keep her in a fenced area, because she chases cars.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I cannot stress this enough! They tend to be very soft dogs! My BC puppy (14 weeks) requires VERY little "correction" as in a gentle "Heidi" or "no" for her to completely understand.

My mother-in-law yelled at her when she was peeing in the house while we were visiting, and she ran and hid under the bed and wouldn't come out for over an hour (Not pleased, she is stuck in the way she trained her dog, 20 years ago).
I hadn't heard this yet but I am pleased to hear! I prefer that I think because I dnot want to be loud. I have my cats trained like dogs: bed, upstairs, no, sit, come, their names etc.. And they are soft spoken commands and reprimands. She will fit right in :)
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Baths, nail trimming, and physical manipulation of the entire body is very important to teach from an early stage.
Yes, I forgot to add that to my list. Handling feet and teeth and such, baths etc. Did that with my cats too as kittens. I can now bath and shave them with no issues. They don't even try and leave :)
 

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Oh, with her having two strong herding breeds, exposure to things that go by very fast while having her NOT chase them is key. There is a BC who comes to the dog park, and they always have to keep her in a fenced area, because she chases cars.
Hadn't thought of this either, thank you! I thought about herding my cats but not cars and such! That can be scary.
 
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