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Hi,

I need some help from some dog experts..

So me and my boyfriend have just got a 1 year old Whippet, she used to live in someones shed with another whippet for the first year of her life... We have got her 2 days ago and i know it is only early days but she won't stop barking when left alone.

The neighbors have said that she has barked the past few days whilst we have been at work, and when we have put her to bed in the kitchen she doesn't stop barking and crying, she jumps up on work surfaces and knocks things off (she's never been in a house before in her life so she doesn't really understand yet)
So the next night we got her a crate - made her a comfy bed in it, we go to bed, and she starts barking again, scratching and thrashing around, and next thing we know she has got out of her crate... we then put the crate next to our bed as we don't know what else to do and she went to sleep instantly.

Do you think getting another whippet would help? Does anyone think that because she grew up with one since being a puppy she needs a companion?
Or do you think we need to ride this out, is it a phase, or??? I don't know what to do so any advice would be greatly appreciated from anyone :)
 

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She needs time to settle in, her world has changed and everything is new to her. I don't recommend getting a second dog unless it's something YOU want for you. You'll likely end up with even more problems and twice the work. Do you have any puzzle toys you can leave her with during the day? Kongs or other food dispensing toys. If she sleeps well at night in your room I'd keep her there. I'm not the best to talk about crating and confinement though. The first night my dane was home she cried and cried. I gave in and brought her into bed where she slept until she was too big to fit with my BF and I. Now she has free roam of the house at night, but she still sneaks into bed sometimes.

So give her time, get some good toys and chews. Exercise, both mental and physical are very important. And patients.
 
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Going from living in a shed to in a house is a big change for her. Give her some time to settle in and learn the rules.
If your going to crate her make sure you spend time with her to do a really good job crate training her. Make it a awsome fun place for her to be. I cant link to it on my phone but it might be worth it to look at the seperation anxiety sticky on here. Not that she nessisarily has seperation anxiety but it might help you to work on getting her comfertable when left alone.
Like annagekos said, getting a kong (or something similar) would be a great thing, you can fill it with lots of yummy things, its would gove her something to occupy her brain and give her good mental stimulation. Making sure shes well exercised can also help take the edge off the stress a bit.
Anyways like already mentioned youve only had her for two days, it can take a few weeks for a new dog to really settle in. Just take it slow and good luck :)
 

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Going from living in a shed to in a house is a big change for her. Give her some time to settle in and learn the rules.
If your going to crate her make sure you spend time with her to do a really good job crate training her. Make it a awsome fun place for her to be. I cant link to it on my phone but it might be worth it to look at the seperation anxiety sticky on here. Not that she nessisarily has seperation anxiety but it might help you to work on getting her comfertable when left alone.
Like annagekos said, getting a kong (or something similar) would be a great thing, you can fill it with lots of yummy things, its would gove her something to occupy her brain and give her good mental stimulation. Making sure shes well exercised can also help take the edge off the stress a bit.
Anyways like already mentioned youve only had her for two days, it can take a few weeks for a new dog to really settle in. Just take it slow and good luck :)
 

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I agree big adjustment, and time is needed.

More important than time is structure and you both staying calm. (Or if need be, go outside and vent your frustration then come back in)

One trick that might work is to put the crate at an elevation so the dog can see you in your bed at night. This gets dog calm and gets dog used to being calm in crate.

Also put dog in crate but with a line-of-sight to you A LOT just in your house regularly. I mean have the dog in the crate but with line-of-sight for hours. When cooking dinner, have the dog in a spot to stare at your ankles. When watching TV/messing around on the computer, have dog in crate where it can see you. This gets dog used to being in the crate.

After a few days of this, step out of line-of-sight just for a few seconds and then step back in. If dog stays calm, reward dog with treat. Start doing this for longer periods of time.
 
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