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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I want to research way ahead of time different breeds of dog to see which is really most compatible with me. I am not currently seeking a new dog but would like to get some ideas for when I will be. I have this long list of desired traits, lol, which I know may be impossible to hit all the points. It would be my ideal, however. I do understand each dog is an individual and there are variations within breeds but I would be interested in other people's input. Here is my dream dog list:

1. Must be friendly and confident with people and kids. I am not looking for a guard dog or a lawsuit. Also, I would like for it to be easy for the vet to administer care if needed.
2. Must be friendly with other dogs, non reactive to other aggressive dogs.
3. Non reactive to livestock. Horses, sheep, cows, goats, etc.
4. Prefer short coat.
5. Somewhat intelligent.
6. A lively dog that enjoys long hikes and daily walks. Sometimes a 8 to 10 mile hike.
7. Medium to large size.
8. Moderate barking would be OK, just not excessive.
9. Not neurotic or fearful.
10. Would like a dog who likes the company of its owner, a velcro dog is OK.
11. Likes to swim.
12. Willing to work with a high energy dog.

Of course I am willing to put in the training and work that is needed. I have experience with dogs of all kinds of personalities so I would not be a first time dog owner. Also, the dog would almost always have company as I work out of my home. So what do you think? Do any of you own a dog that fits this description?
 

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Based on your bullet points, a showline Golden Retriever hits all those points the easiest. They're the best match theoretically (if not one of the best). "Friendly and confident" with people and dogs is very much genetic, but is also a matter of training in the puppy stages and how you socialize.

But those are pretty basic dog requirements that many dogs fit in. You can also look at dogs in rescue with foster parents, who are already adults/young adults with a mature and known temperament. You can foster first to "try out" the dog, and go for a foster to adopt situation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Based on your bullet points, a showline Golden Retriever hits all those points the easiest. They're the best match theoretically (if not one of the best). "Friendly and confident" with people and dogs is very much genetic, but is also a matter of training in the puppy stages and how you socialize.

But those are pretty basic dog requirements that many dogs fit in. You can also look at dogs in rescue with foster parents, who are already adults/young adults with a mature and known temperament. You can foster first to "try out" the dog, and go for a foster to adopt situation.

I have already pretty much ruled out a golden retriever. Their coats are every difficult to deal with where I live. I took care of one for a friend for a few months and while she was a real sweetheart, her coat was a nightmare. My sister also has a sweetheart of a Golden Retriever, but just not what I am looking for.
I have had several "rescues" over the past few years and while I am not ruling that possibility out, I was kind of looking for a pedigreed dog this time around.
 

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How about a Labrador? Because to me that looks like a description of one.

Or the shorthaires sister of my dog's breed, the Smooth Collie? It is not as perfect match as a retriever but might be worth finding out. You must socialize it with cattle and horses though so it would not try to chase them later. Swimming is though unguaranteed.

Shaved poodle? Other water dogs would fit otherwise but I have met/heard of too many fearful or aggressive Spanish Water Dogs to recommend this breed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Have you considered a Lab?
Considered it and actually I have a friend who shows and breeds labs but I am not a real fan of the looks or the personality of the ones I have been around. Not really sure why but I don't really feel a connection there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
How about a Labrador? Because to me that looks like a description of one.

Or the shorthaires sister of my dog's breed, the Smooth Collie? It is not as perfect match as a retriever but might be worth finding out. You must socialize it with cattle and horses though so it would not try to chase them later. Swimming is though unguaranteed.

Shaved poodle? Other water dogs would fit otherwise but I have met/heard of too many fearful or aggressive Spanish Water Dogs to recommend this breed.
Smooth Collie sounds like a possibility.

My most recent experiences have been with what I would call "bull breed" mixes. I absolutely love the looks and personality and stability with people of the AST and APBT, but I just don't want to deal with the animal aggression quite frankly. I am OK with a dog who kills rodents, actually welcome that, and they don't have to get along with cats either.
 

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I have already pretty much ruled out a golden retriever. Their coats are every difficult to deal with where I live. I took care of one for a friend for a few months and while she was a real sweetheart, her coat was a nightmare. My sister also has a sweetheart of a Golden Retriever, but just not what I am looking for.
I have had several "rescues" over the past few years and while I am not ruling that possibility out, I was kind of looking for a pedigreed dog this time around.
Goldens generally have an easy medium coat with not a lot of shedding, relative to the heavy-shedding breeds. :p But I totally missed the short coat bullet point.

If not Labs either... Smooth collies as a herding breed will want to herd livestock, if that's a problem. Maybe consider a livestock guardian dog, like Great Pyrenees or Newfoundland? Newfoundlands love water and are famously great with kids and livestock and are pretty much the bombproof breed of the dog world. But they shed heavy heavy and drool like there's no tomorrow LOL.

A standard poodle might also be a good choice? :p

The thing is that a lot of "higher-energy" breeds, excluding Goldens, more or less have a higher chance at being reactive or nervous towards this or that, kids or animals. So just looking at your bullet points, it more becomes a matter of your training and socialization and genetics, less the breed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Goldens generally have an easy medium coat with not a lot of shedding, relative to the heavy-shedding breeds. :p But I totally missed the short coat bullet point.

If not Labs either... Smooth collies as a herding breed will want to herd livestock, if that's a problem. Maybe consider a livestock guardian dog, like Great Pyrenees or Newfoundland? Newfoundlands love water and are famously great with kids and livestock and are pretty much the bombproof breed of the dog world. But they shed heavy heavy and drool like there's no tomorrow LOL.

A standard poodle might also be a good choice? :p

The thing is that a lot of "higher-energy" breeds, excluding Goldens, more or less have a higher chance at being reactive or nervous towards this or that, kids or animals. So just looking at your bullet points, it more becomes a matter of your training and socialization and genetics, less the breed.
Never really thought of higher energy breeds having a higher chance of being reactive, so that's something to consider. Its Ok if its a herding breed as it will never be off leash, or allowed to roam amongst livestock. I just don't want a dog going nuts on the leash lunging toward every horse, cow, etc. that I walk by which I know mainly comes down to training, but I'd rather not deal with it. I like the personality of standard poodle, just not sure about the coat.

I've been spoiled because the dog who has been my regular walking/hiking partner is not technically my dog. He belongs to my son-in-law and daughter who have just recently moved and took the dog with them. I am still currently driving into town to pick him up and bring him back with me during the day but I know eventually that may come to an end. Having such a great dog in my life has made me realize that I really need a dog that is good out in public with other people and animals. He's really a fantastic dog.
 

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What breed or mix is your daughter's dog?
What do you think about hounds? They are pretty sturdy dogs with generally a good disposition towards people and other dogs.
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IMO, show bred Labs are far different from field bred. It's worth meeting some hunting Labs just to see.

Poodles are great too. It wouldn't be terribly hard to keep him/her shaved.

Additionally, have you thought about a hound of some kind? They aren't always reliable off leash in terms of recall, but can be really awesome otherwise.
 

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I'd say go through a dog breed database, find a dog look you like, and then go from there as your list of requirements meets a lot of dogs. Most of the "traits" you want are personality based so if you find a dog you like the look of then you can contact breeders and find the dog with the personality you want. From there it's all about the training and socializing you put in ;)
 

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1. Must be friendly and confident with people and kids. I am not looking for a guard dog or a lawsuit. Also, I would like for it to be easy for the vet to administer care if needed.
2. Must be friendly with other dogs, non reactive to other aggressive dogs.
3. Non reactive to livestock. Horses, sheep, cows, goats, etc.
4. Prefer short coat.
5. Somewhat intelligent.
6. A lively dog that enjoys long hikes and daily walks. Sometimes a 8 to 10 mile hike.
7. Medium to large size.
8. Moderate barking would be OK, just not excessive.
9. Not neurotic or fearful.
10. Would like a dog who likes the company of its owner, a velcro dog is OK.
11. Likes to swim.
12. Willing to work with a high energy dog.

I would consider a standard poodle. You would have to keep the coat short to achieve what you want. But they are great dogs not at all like the small ones.
They love swimming, retrieving , love to run and are quite hardy.
Standard Poodles: What's Good About 'Em? What's Bad About 'Em?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
What breed or mix is your daughter's dog?
What do you think about hounds? They are pretty sturdy dogs with generally a good disposition towards people and other dogs.
Posted via Mobile Device
Yes, I guess depending on which hound, a hound could be a possibility.

My daughter's dog is, a mutt. If I had to guess, a bull breed mix of some kind. We actually found him 4 years ago abandoned on the side of the road, he had mange and was very thin. Very, very terrified and unsocialized dog. I called animal control to pick him up as I was afraid of him getting hit by a car but they said they couldn't pick him up until Monday (this was a Saturday). So we loaded him up and I took him home with me. It took months and months of love and patience to even get the poor dog to walk on a leash without pancaking to the ground. It was a slow process but he turned out to be the best dog ever!!! The gentlest, sweetest, most loving dog and totally non reactive to other dogs and animals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
1. Must be friendly and confident with people and kids. I am not looking for a guard dog or a lawsuit. Also, I would like for it to be easy for the vet to administer care if needed.
2. Must be friendly with other dogs, non reactive to other aggressive dogs.
3. Non reactive to livestock. Horses, sheep, cows, goats, etc.
4. Prefer short coat.
5. Somewhat intelligent.
6. A lively dog that enjoys long hikes and daily walks. Sometimes a 8 to 10 mile hike.
7. Medium to large size.
8. Moderate barking would be OK, just not excessive.
9. Not neurotic or fearful.
10. Would like a dog who likes the company of its owner, a velcro dog is OK.
11. Likes to swim.
12. Willing to work with a high energy dog.

I would consider a standard poodle. You would have to keep the coat short to achieve what you want. But they are great dogs not at all like the small ones.
They love swimming, retrieving , love to run and are quite hardy.
Standard Poodles: What's Good About 'Em? What's Bad About 'Em?

I am thinking that a standard poodle could actually be a strong contender, I like their athleticism and smarts.
 

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Never really thought of higher energy breeds having a higher chance of being reactive, so that's something to consider. Its Ok if its a herding breed as it will never be off leash, or allowed to roam amongst livestock. I just don't want a dog going nuts on the leash lunging toward every horse, cow, etc. that I walk by which I know mainly comes down to training, but I'd rather not deal with it. I like the personality of standard poodle, just not sure about the coat.

I've been spoiled because the dog who has been my regular walking/hiking partner is not technically my dog. He belongs to my son-in-law and daughter who have just recently moved and took the dog with them. I am still currently driving into town to pick him up and bring him back with me during the day but I know eventually that may come to an end. Having such a great dog in my life has made me realize that I really need a dog that is good out in public with other people and animals. He's really a fantastic dog.
It still depends heavily on genetics and training... take the higher-energy thing with a grain of salt/case by case though. I guess what I mean is: take an average King Charles Spaniel or French Bulldog compared to an average Airedale Terrier or German Shepherd. The King Charles/French Bulldog is much much less likely to become neurotic/reactive, compared to the Airedale or GSD.

Your son-in-law sounds lucky! What breed of dog is he? :p

I think there are many breeds (from the right lines/breeder) that apply for what you want, unless liking water is important(?). So it just becomes a matter of training.

I'd definitely avoid the majority of herding breeds, if you don't want to deal with herding drive to begin with... But showline Collies may be ideal. My Australian Shepherd innately wants to flip out on the end of the leash in an effort to chase down livestock or cars LOL.
 
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