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Today I adopted a 10 month old mini Poodle/Daschund mix. (70% poodle 30% doxen)
He is named Prince Taylor and is very small. He's very sweet and well socialized, he does well with everyone and is really responsive to having his name called.
The people who owned him before us, however, had done absolutely no training with him.
He has always been allowed to yelp in his crate. He quiets down after a while, but I need to train him not to yelp at all. This is my second dog (my first was a shih tzu that was essentially a perfect dog) and I have no idea how to teach him not to bark while in his kennel. I mean, he's been allowed to all his life, how do I unteach that?

I want to train him to become a therapy dog, but my sister says he's too active. He's very bouncy, excitable and happy-go-lucky, but he loves everybody and likes to flop in people's laps while they pet him.
Do you think he'll grow out of this? (he's also not currently neutered, but he will be soon)

Also, he loves other dogs but my sister's dogs hate him. Should they just stay away from each other?

Thanks!
 

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It's Dachshund (badger dog) not Daschund (the trash), it's an important difference. ;)

I can't help you much with crate training, because my dog roams the dog freely (crate are not really common here outside of sports events or dog shows), but a lot of Dackel are pretty vocal to my personal experience and to some point you've got to work with what you've got.
Dogs make sounds.
they are social living being.
they communicate with humans with sounds...probably also because a lot of people are pants at reading body language.

Does your dog seem content in the crate? bored? distressed?
If he seems to be unwell in the cage, I'd try reintroducing it from the very beginning again, slowly making it an enjoyable place to be with treats, interesting crate games, praises and loads of patience. :)
make it interesting, fun and rewarding for the dog to be inside the crate.

with the "flopping in people lap"-thing...Sancho does that too if he likes the person Teo did that too. It looks more funny than with your dog though, because they are/were ca. 3-times as heavy and a lot bigger than your dog. :D
I don't think he'll completely grow out of it, but it can be that with growing up he'll be much more people selective and only does it with "his special human" or only with family members.
A lot of dogs become like that when they're around 2 or 3 years.

when it comes for therapy I think it depends on what you want to do with them.
However a lot of (adult) Dackel can be a bit nippy and not so tolant of strangers handling them and perhaps that's not the best thing for a therapy dog.
You've got to keep an eye on the dog and decide if he's able to do such a job and if the dogs enjoys doing such a job.
Best would be to have a therapy dog group with you to help you evaluate the dog's behaviour and decides if he fits this purpose.
 

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It's Dachshund (badger dog) not Daschund (the trash), it's an important difference. ;)

I can't help you much with crate training, because my dog roams the dog freely (crate are not really common here outside of sports events or dog shows), but a lot of Dackel are pretty vocal to my personal experience and to some point you've got to work with what you've got.
Dogs make sounds.
they are social living being.
they communicate with humans with sounds...probably also because a lot of people are pants at reading body language.

Does your dog seem content in the crate? bored? distressed?
If he seems to be unwell in the cage, I'd try reintroducing it from the very beginning again, slowly making it an enjoyable place to be with treats, interesting crate games, praises and loads of patience. :)
make it interesting, fun and rewarding for the dog to be inside the crate.

with the "flopping in people lap"-thing...Sancho does that too if he likes the person Teo did that too. It looks more funny than with your dog though, because they are/were ca. 3-times as heavy and a lot bigger than your dog. :D
I don't think he'll completely grow out of it, but it can be that with growing up he'll be much more people selective and only does it with "his special human" or only with family members.
A lot of dogs become like that when they're around 2 or 3 years.

when it comes for therapy I think it depends on what you want to do with them.
However a lot of (adult) Dackel can be a bit nippy and not so tolant of strangers handling them and perhaps that's not the best thing for a therapy dog.
You've got to keep an eye on the dog and decide if he's able to do such a job and if the dogs enjoys doing such a job.
Best would be to have a therapy dog group with you to help you evaluate the dog's behaviour and decides if he fits this purpose.
Aha thanks! I was never the best at spelling XD

Yes, I would let him roam but he's not housetrained, which we're working on.
 

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It's Dachshund (badger dog) not Daschund (the trash), it's an important difference. ;)
Near spit my coffee out. GF is German and bilingual, I'm a newfie trying to learn German.

I can't help on the crate side either, ours uses his kennel when he's on a bone or as a safe zone so to speak, never locked in. Maybe leave the door open for a bit of time, see how he reacts. And if you are looking at using the dog for therapy, get him used to being picked up and handled.

Trying to picture a Poodle/Daschund mix, have a picture?
 

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@PrinceTay02 When it comes to crate training, you're going to want to build all sorts of positive associations with the crate. Leave some awesome treats in the crate for him to find whenever he sniffs inside it or goes inside it completely. I might also suggest feeding him in the crate as well. As for the barking/whining/etc. while in the crate, so long as you're sure he doesn't need to potty, ignore it. Ignoring the attention-seeking noise teaches your dog that it gets him no where to cry and screech while he's in his crate. When he gets quiet, that's when you reward heavily with a lot of awesome treats! He'll catch on soon enough that being quiet is the way to go, unless he needs to go out and potty. Generally, with my own dog, I noticed a pattern: When he wanted attention at night when he was in his crate, he would raise holy hell and practically blow the roof off his crate trying to get my attention. But when he needed to potty, he'd start off whining or something and (if he couldn't get my attention or couldn't get me to wake up) he would then escalate if necessary. And now he sleeps in bed with me haha.

When it comes to him flopping in people's laps and things like that, work on reinforcing what you would like him to do when you pet him. If you would prefer him to lay next to you on the couch while you pet him, reward him with yummy treats when he is doing exactly that. You may also need to teach him politeness, so sitting for attention instead of jumping, keeping all four paws on the floor, etc.

Right now, since he's not potty trained yet, you'll probably want to keep him near you at all times. I tethered Merlin to me with a leash when he was a puppy and, while it is a pain in the butt, it really does help because you can catch him before he eliminates in your home, rather than after it's too late. While he's tethered to you, start rewarding him for things he's doing right: sitting politely, laying down near your feet, chilling on the couch with you, etc. Rewarding while he's relaxed and not running around like a crazy dog will help reinforce that calm behavior and soon enough your dog will want to choose calmer behaviors.

There is a very good chance your dog will calm down some as time goes on, but I wouldn't bet a butt load of cash on him calming down to a significantly more mellow state. I didn't a poor job of training certain behaviors with my dog when he was younger (jumping on guests in my home, being a prime example) because I assumed it was a puppy behavior that he would eventually grow out of. Now, at two years old, he's still doing it and I'm just embarrassed by it. So, bottom line, start working with your dog now on any and all behaviors you'd like to improve. Your pup might mellow out, but it'll will probably be a few years down the road.

The best thing you can do is invest in training classes with your dog. Your local Petco or Petsmart will have classes, but there may also be classes in your area hosted by local clubs or something that you can look in to. Pick a class that is positive reinforcement only (so force-free, aversive free). The class will not only help you train your pup, but it will help build a relationship between the two of you. While you're at it, look around and see if you can find training classes for potential therapy dogs. Also make friends with the trainer for your class, because they might be able to help you determine if your pup would make a good therapy dog. You may want to talk with someone affiliated with a local therapy dog organization as well.

Anyway, sorry for the long, semi-rambling post. I hope it was helpful. If it wasn't, let me know and I'll try to reduce and condense to an easier to understand, more readable post size.
 

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Trying to picture a Poodle/Daschund mix, have a picture?
Ahh not yet XD He won't stay still long enough for me to get one... He's very tiny, with a dachshund face and a schnauzer-like haircut. His fur is very soft and not horrible curly. He's fluffy, and black with brown paws.

He's darn cute :)
Thanks for your advice!
 
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