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Hi all, I am from The Netherlands and am writing this post on behalf of a good friend of mine living in the USA, Cleveland, Ohio.

This friend has a Chesapeake Bay retriever (mixed with another unknown breed) named Jake (brown) of about 10 years old. He adopted the dog at a relatively young age from a shelter after it had been on the street for an unknown period of time, possibly a year. It's basically a sweet dog but has some behavioral problems, it has happened in the past a couple of times that he bit a passer by without provocation. It seems some past experiences sometimes cause anxiety.

This friend is suffering from depression and to be able to move on with his life and get to a situation to help himself he needs to find a new home for his dog. Understandably he wants a good home for his dog and euthanasia is out of the question because he feels responsible for the animal. The depression however is standing in the way of him making the proper arrangements to find his dog a new loving home, which is why I am trying to help him as a friend.

I am seeking your advice on what he could do, or possibly what I could do to resolve this situation and help my friend and find his dog a good home where he can reach old age. Of course, me being in Europe doesn't make it any easier.

I thank you in advance for any help!
If you have any questions please let me know.

Regards,

Jager
 

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The United States is particularly litigious, and many jurisdictions have a 'one bite' rule saying in essence that after the first bite, since the owner now knows of the dog's proclivities, he can be held financially responsible for a dog bite. I've seen the figure $20,000. associated with the average cost of a dog bite.
If the owner transfers ownership without disclosing the bite history, he remains liable.
I get it that he feels responsible for the dog. However, he also IS responsible for innocent people including children that might be endangered by this dog.
Finding a home where the new owner puts training into a dog (but still has liability) might be possible for a young dog, but finding such a home for a ten year old dog may be far more difficult.
He could talk to some dog rescue groups. He could also revisit euthanasia if no acceptable home could be found. It is a difficult choice, but to put others at risk is unthinkable also, and any new home would have to be made aware of the risk and the financial liability.
 

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The United States is particularly litigious, and many jurisdictions have a 'one bite' rule saying in essence that after the first bite, since the owner now knows of the dog's proclivities, he can be held financially responsible for a dog bite. I've seen the figure $20,000. associated with the average cost of a dog bite.
If the owner transfers ownership without disclosing the bite history, he remains liable.
I get it that he feels responsible for the dog. However, he also IS responsible for innocent people including children that might be endangered by this dog.
Finding a home where the new owner puts training into a dog (but still has liability) might be possible for a young dog, but finding such a home for a ten year old dog may be far more difficult.
He could talk to some dog rescue groups. He could also revisit euthanasia if no acceptable home could be found. It is a difficult choice, but to put others at risk is unthinkable also, and any new home would have to be made aware of the risk and the financial liability.
Hi Lucille, thank you so much for your response. My friend is aware of this liability and this is also the reason I mention this behavioral problem in my opening post. I agree this dog would not be suited for a family with small children.
BTW, how would one go about about making it official the new owner is told about the behavioral problems?

I always had a feeling this dog would be best suited on a farm or something similar where people this dog meets are usually known by the owner or at least someone who is used to 'difficult' dogs.

To put his behavior in perspective, these are the incidents that happened in the last 8 years:
-tried to attack (but never bit) a person walking towards him and my friend in the opposite way on a rural path (walking the dog which was leashed).
-bit a jogger in the leg (minor laceration) in the hallway of my friends apartment building where he lived at that time. They were coming out of the apartment and this person was jogging by possibly startling the dog.
-A neighbor walking by the garden, dog was getting ready to be walked and on a leash but lashed out at the neighbor's leg, also minor laceration. This was a person the dog should have known.

No incidents with children. The dog was frequently walked by my friends mother (an elderly, small woman) without any incidents.
I also met this dog myself and never felt threatened of saw aggressive behavior. However, sometimes he seems to get triggered by something.

No liability suits where ever started against the dog / my friend.

Any chance you could provide me with a link to such a dog rescue group in his vicinity (Cleveland, Ohio)?
 

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I am just an ordinary dog owner, so do not know of any Ohio rescues.
Your friend would have to keep a copy of a signed, dated written disclosure to the new owner, disclosing the bite incidents. It should also clearly say that this is a transfer of ownership, so that the new owner could not later say he was merely boarding the dog.
 

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BTW you might rethink a farm. A farm is a business, and as such there are legal requirements for invitees, those who come there for a business purpose, requiring prior adequate warnings of known dangers, which this dog definitely is.
 

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Sorry I missed the mixed part. But that is somewhat of a rare breed and many breed rescues help dogs that are part of their choice breed too so you can still try.
 

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BTW you might rethink a farm. A farm is a business, and as such there are legal requirements for invitees, those who come there for a business purpose, requiring prior adequate warnings of known dangers, which this dog definitely is.
When I said farm I actually meant more something like a rural domicile or a farmstead or something similar, so definitely not a business. English not being my first language it is sometimes hard to use the correct terms ;)
 

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Breed rescues will also help mixes of their breeds so it's definitely worth a shot! :)

Even if these rescues won't/can't take him, they may have connections to other people who he could try.
 

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Breed rescues will also help mixes of their breeds so it's definitely worth a shot! :)

Even if these rescues won't/can't take him, they may have connections to other people who he could try.
Right, which is why I am trying several things. I also send an e-mail to vet ranch (I assume their YouTube channel is known here) who are based in Texas but hoping for a referral. So far after one week no response from them. Don't blame them, I assume they are bombarded by requests. But it is the reason I am now trying some other ways, like this forum, so far it works :D

Thanks all!
 

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You may get a better response if you contact places via Facebook instead of email.
hmm yeah, I guess you are right because of the public nature of FB.
However, I am not a big Facebook fan and have no account. If all else fails I will consider creating one, after all it's for a good cause.
 
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