Dog Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We have a male german shepherd that is an outdoor dog, we let him out to run and play everyday but as soon as he gets out the gate he runs straight into the field and will chase and bark at the horses, ive even caught him trying to bite them. I really like our male but i cannot get him to stop. I have to get out there and chase him back to his pin. We have been letting him come into the house more so now thanks to the weather but not for long cause he pees on everything and hes so big he knocks down my son. Hes doing it so much our littel female shep. is starting to as well and we dont want her to start that habbit. im at a loss here. Do any of you have any suggestions? thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
We have 2 working dogs: Aussie Shepard (Maggie) and Australian cattle dog (Grace) on our 20+ horse farm. We train colts- so our dogs absolutely CANNOT be aggressive with our horses- even though their instinct makes them want to herd/push livestock.

Our quandary is that they have to work stock (ie: follow legs, herd and push cows, sometimes get aggressive with bulls) but know that they are never to act that way with horses.

Since you say that your dog immediately runs down to chase. The behavior has already developed...and unfortunately you need to start from a disciplinary point and not a teaching point at this time. (Since it does not seem like your dog is afraid when exposed...and instead is "looking for something fun to do.")

1. Any bark, bite, or chase should immediately prompt a "Come to Jesus" session.

2. It also helps that we teach them to come inside fences only on invitation. This requires that you dog has a good "Down" and "Stay". If the dog enters the pen while we are working the horses uninvited- we give them one chance "Out"...and then another "Come to Jesus Session" if needed.

3. Since your dog likes to chase- I would get a prong collar and go down to the area with him with leash in hand and pocket full of treats. One show of bad behavior- one sharp jerk. If he continues to ignore you- up the ante. The minute he is good and redirects attention to you- ask for a sit and give a treat. You have got to reward the slightest good behavior.

I am like anyone else, and do not like to chastise my dog...but I have found that especially with dogs bred to herd/work I would rather drill the point home once or twice and never have the issue come up again. Especially around horses...this is a safety issue.

Our dogs are really not big barkers...but they did used to chase...and they do not any longer. We now let them loose on the property and they do not look for trouble with the horses anymore.

Every once in awhile- Grace will be walking behind the horses (okay behavior) but then will reach up like she wants a little bite (not okay behavior). She gets a big butt swat with my lariat and immediately is sent outside the pen.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
There was a Dog Whisperer show about this and it required 2 people to teach the dog, one to be with the dog and one to work the horse so that it tempted the dog. He put the dog on a down stay and the lady would lunge the horse. She was always to put the dog in the same spot and it did work.

I need to do this with my husky, she gets stomped, etc. but can't resist when they play whereas my cattle dog pup got stomped once and now he stays outta the way! Smart little guy :)

Goodluck with your dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thanks for your replys. I think his biggest problem is he is one of 3 shepherds here all my moms. I personally dont get into the dogs, my passion runs more for the horses. But this male is the only one kept outside all day, and she only lets him out once a day to play for maybe 20-30 min. She really needs to work with him and give him more attention, he does not listen to come sit or stay he does know how to shake. And the last time we tryed to put a collar and leash on him he flipped out. We can now put a collar on him and he's fine but not a leash. ANd the other morning he went to far, i saw him attacking my new clyde, bitting at her back hooves, but shes so calm and gentle natured she just let him. it just makes me so mad.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
He has you guys trained! Put the leash on him and hang on. Don't give into him at all. Let him flip out. He'll stop on his own once he realizes your not going to give into him.

He needs more attention and lots of Obedience work. I wouldn't use a prong collar but a martingale. Click on this link: https://www.premier.com/store/Products.aspx?cid=1&pid=11 To see what I use. (Don't like prong collars. Was a vet tech and saw and still see too many people that don't know how to use these properly give real injuries to the dogs. They are good though on some dogs and when used properly). Once the dog is leash broke then you could go to a choke chain. Again, be sure to use this properly. I like the choke chain once the dog is leash broke as they can also hear it. On little "clink" sound and they know to pay attention.

Take him to Obedience classes to work him and learn more training tips.

I agree with cattyinthehatty! Good advise there! The "come to Jesus" sessions are a must with dogs like yours! :D
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top