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Well, I didn’t recommend them because they are all brachycephalic, although it’s true they all are. I chose them because
  • They are small and medium breeds
  • They don’t bark that much
  • They tend to like to cuddle
  • I think they are pretty good in apartments
Although it’s true that they wouldn’t be good with stairs, your typical apartment would have maximum one flight of stairs, which honestly isn’t that bad, so I think that would be fine.
And also, I recommended getting them from a rescue or a shelter, and those guys need to be adopted anyways, and you aren’t encouraging breeding their flat faces, so it works out well in the end.
Brachycephalic dogs often have multiple health problems because they cannot breathe properly. English bulldogs can have that problem and others as well. Not the best idea for a first time dog owner.

There's no breed that "don't tent to bark that much" or that "likes to cuddle". It is entirely dependent on the individual dog, that dog's particular breeding and genetics, and how that dog has been trained, conditioned, and treated. You cannot ascribe those characteristics to a breed in general, because doing so is not going to be accurate. For instance I have known excessively barky French bulldogs and pugs. Barking is a matter of training for the most part. Almost any dog can be trained not to be barky.

I also agree with Joanne that typical apartment buildings are more than one story or two in height, even up to 20 or 30, so it might be that the OP lives many floors up.
 

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I really think rescue groups can be the way to go here. After Miles, who incidentally was a Pekingese Shih Tzu mix, passed away, I contacted a rescue group that specializes in Pekingese dogs. We had a very positive conversation about my living situation, including my work hours, and I adopted Ashes, who's a Pekingese Cocker Spaniel mix.

Like Miles, Asher is middle-aged and he's quite content with two walks a day. While I live in a detached house with a fenced in backyard, he much prefers to be inside rather than outside. He'd do fine in an apartment as long as there's no stairs. When I was working outside the home pre-pandemic, he was fine being by himself and slept throughout the day. He only barks when the mail carrier comes, which I already knew from his foster parents.

There are clearly breed differences: German shepherds, border collies, and cocker spaniels are clearly very different kinds of dogs. I think it's helpful to think about the original purpose of why a breed was developed. A husky was bred to pull dogsleds over miles and miles of snowy terrain, and therefore, not a good fit for apartment life. I gravitate to Peke mixes because I like companion dogs.

Also, the age and energy level of the dog will matter a great deal. When I adopted Asher, I specified that I wanted a dog that could go on neighborhood walks with me. Going though a rescue group can be a great option. They can help find the right dog for you. Good luck!
 

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I think it's helpful to think about the original purpose of why a breed was developed.
So true. If more people paid attention to this and did extensive research on breed types before getting a dog they liked the looks of, or saw on TV, I think fewer dogs would end up in shelters or rescues.

The great thing about going to a rescue is you can tell them exactly what you can offer a dog and they can find a good match.
 

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I really think rescue groups can be the way to go here. After Miles, who incidentally was a Pekingese Shih Tzu mix, passed away, I contacted a rescue group that specializes in Pekingese dogs. We had a very positive conversation about my living situation, including my work hours, and I adopted Ashes, who's a Pekingese Cocker Spaniel mix.

Like Miles, Asher is middle-aged and he's quite content with two walks a day. While I live in a detached house with a fenced in backyard, he much prefers to be inside rather than outside. He'd do fine in an apartment as long as there's no stairs. When I was working outside the home pre-pandemic, he was fine being by himself and slept throughout the day. He only barks when the mail carrier comes, which I already knew from his foster parents.

There are clearly breed differences: German shepherds, border collies, and cocker spaniels are clearly very different kinds of dogs. I think it's helpful to think about the original purpose of why a breed was developed. A husky was bred to pull dogsleds over miles and miles of snowy terrain, and therefore, not a good fit for apartment life. I gravitate to Peke mixes because I like companion dogs.

Also, the age and energy level of the dog will matter a great deal. When I adopted Asher, I specified that I wanted a dog that could go on neighborhood walks with me. Going though a rescue group can be a great option. They can help find the right dog for you. Good luck!
I completely agree.
 

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That is true... But you could also have a mix with one of these breeds that doesn’t have the brachycephalic face.

@Terrii, how many flights of stairs is your apartment?
Hi! I live in a high rise so there are elevators. You can take the stairs if you want but I'm pretty high up so I usually don't.

I definitely would prefer to adopt from a rescue centre, but where I am located in Australia most of the dogs are typically large and have high-energy requirements. If there is a smaller dog like a pug available they will usually get a flood of applications by the end of the day.
 

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Elevators are great!

Living in the States, I'm not familiar with how dog adoptions are carried out in Australia. I live in Southern California, and we have many large public shelters run by both counties and cities. Those shelters are the easiest to adopt from, and that's where I obtained Miles. We also have various privately run shelters in which the dogs are kenneled. Then we have a number of non-profit rescue groups which pull dogs out of the public shelters as well as accept owner surrenders. Many of these groups foster their dogs in private homes. My current dog, Asher, came from a breed-specific rescue group. If and when I adopt another dog, I'll most likely connect that rescue group because I trust them in matching me with their dogs.

Before you bring home a new dog, I think it's really important to be realistic in your expectations. A large, high-energy dog is probably not for you. A smaller adult dog would be more appropriate.
 

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Hi! I live in a high rise so there are elevators. You can take the stairs if you want but I'm pretty high up so I usually don't.

I definitely would prefer to adopt from a rescue centre, but where I am located in Australia most of the dogs are typically large and have high-energy requirements. If there is a smaller dog like a pug available they will usually get a flood of applications by the end of the day.
Ah, well, often something like this is the case, depending on location. But this is also why it's important to put in applications to the rescues ahead of time, so that you are pre-approved and they are ready to adopt a dog out to you. Once y ou do that, then you can stay on top of their listings and jump in fast if a small dog comes up that looks good.
You can also talk to them about what you want and ask to be put on a list of "wanting small dog". That way maybe when one comes in and you have reached the top of the list, they will call you. Of course, I have no idea if the rescues in your area actually will do this, but I know that some of them here do, so you may as well ask.
 

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Hi! I live in a high rise so there are elevators. You can take the stairs if you want but I'm pretty high up so I usually don't.

I definitely would prefer to adopt from a rescue centre, but where I am located in Australia most of the dogs are typically large and have high-energy requirements. If there is a smaller dog like a pug available they will usually get a flood of applications by the end of the day.
Elevators are great!

Living in the States, I'm not familiar with how dog adoptions are carried out in Australia. I live in Southern California, and we have many large public shelters run by both counties and cities. Those shelters are the easiest to adopt from, and that's where I obtained Miles. We also have various privately run shelters in which the dogs are kenneled. Then we have a number of non-profit rescue groups which pull dogs out of the public shelters as well as accept owner surrenders. Many of these groups foster their dogs in private homes. My current dog, Asher, came from a breed-specific rescue group. If and when I adopt another dog, I'll most likely connect that rescue group because I trust them in matching me with their dogs.

Before you bring home a new dog, I think it's really important to be realistic in your expectations. A large, high-energy dog is probably not for you. A smaller adult dog would be more appropriate.
I second looking for any breed specific rescues. They often get crosses of their breed in too.
 
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