Dog Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys

I have a adult GSD and he is a total Alpha. I am thinking of getting some more pups and the first one to the gang is going to be a male Amstaff puppy 70 days old.

Does anyone have any experience with Amstaffs and other dogs and breeds?? I dont want a situation where the new additions clash with the GSD.

I have been told and in my reading I have also learnt that if kept with other dogs from a young age then it is generally not a problem ,but some blogs/websites did mention they are prone to be Dog aggressive.

If there is someone with this particular experience your feedback will be much appreciated. I am planning to get one within the week.

Udit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
Unfortunately, Amstaffs are genetically predisposed towards dog aggression. If an Amstaff has dog aggression, it cannot be trained out. Often, Amstaffs and pits can do great with litter mates until about a year and a half to two years old then they "turn on" and become DA. Do NOT get an Amstaff the same sex as your GSD! You would just be asking for trouble. If you do get an Amstaff, do NOT leave the dogs alone when you are gone. Countless stories of people coming home to a dog fight with seriously injured dog. You may have to "crate and rotate." I have 2 pit bulls and LOVE the breed but as an owner of an Amstaff or pit you must be diligent and responsible. There are several Amstaff and pit bull forums which can provide much information. Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,208 Posts
First of all define what you mean by "total Alpha". And how does he get along with other dogs? Is he neutered? And how old is he? Also where are you planning to get an Am Staff puppy? There are a lot of unsavory people that breed and sell them.

Unless the puppy you get is really wimpy and good I would advise against getting an Am Staff puppy. Like someone said they (and GSDs) are both prone to dog-dog aggression. Along with that, they're both male. The best combos with potentially aggressive dogs are *usually* female/male so I would suggest getting a female puppy instead, and only after you saw your dog get along with her.

I think this whole situation needs a bit more consideration before you dive in and bring a new pup home.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,222 Posts
Unfortunately, Amstaffs are genetically predisposed towards dog aggression.
Do you honestly believe that? Every animal on the face of the planet is predisposed to aggression - it's offensive or defensive.

Have to agree with Tracie tho, sounds like you need to do some work with your GSD before even considering bringing in other dogs. If he's the dominant member of the family, then you're likely set up for failure before you begin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,623 Posts
Do you honestly believe that? Every animal on the face of the planet is predisposed to aggression - it's offensive or defensive.
It's science. All dog breeds are predisposed to certain behaviors, whether we like it or not. If this weren't true, we wouldn't have different breeds for hunting, herding, etc. There are many dog breeds that have a higher chance of becoming dog aggressive than others, it's not exclusive to amstaffs or pit bulls. Jack russells and blue heelers are some examples. It's not a bad thing and continuing to pretend that it doesn't exist does more harm than good.

There is an ongoing (as far as I know) experiment that has been going on for 50+ years about linking genetics to behavior in foxes. A lot of the domestic pet foxes you see now are a result of this experiment. They took aggressive foxes and bred them with other aggressive foxes, and more docile foxes with other docile foxes. Later on they would have a fox kit born from aggressive parents be raised in a docile litter by a docile mother. The kit from the aggressive parents grew up to be aggressive despite being raised the same way as the docile foxes and growing up surrounded by docile foxes. Genetics DO play a role in temperament.

However, I don't want to argue or get off topic, so I'll stop it there. I would also like to know what you mean by your GSD being "alpha". Does he just not like to be challenged? Or does he have a tendency to fight? If you were to get an amstaff, I think a female pup would be a better option.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
442 Posts
An amstaff is not a good choice if your plan is to have more than 2 dogs who live together peacefully always. A male amstaff is not a good idea even if you are content with only 2 dogs, as same sex pairs are more likely to have problems than opposite sex. A female amstaff would be potentially more likely to be ok with your male GSD, but it would be dependent on both dogs' individual temperaments. The description of your GSDs temperament makes it sound like he might be a bit pushy or overbearing, which is probably not going to go over well with any amstaff, and breaking up fights between 100+ lbs of dog is no fun for anyone, nor is keeping dogs separate for life, so I would avoid that particular combination of dogs/breeds.

Dog aggression is not a trait which is exclusive to pit bulls and amstaffs, but they are certainly breeds in which it is more likely to occur due to the breed's extensive fighting history. The national breed club says the following:
In general, an Am Staff should not be left alone with other dogs. Dog aggression is something that can develop in even well-socialized dogs. Aggression towards humans in this breed in non-threatening situations should never be seen. They are very good with children, but keep in mind children and dogs of any breed should never be left alone together.
The UKC breed standard for the APBT (many dogs registered with either registry are also registered with the other or have recent ancestors that were, and if you are in europe, some amstaffs supposedly are APBTs registered as staffs due to importation/breed restrictions) says the following:
Because most APBTs exhibit some level of dog aggression and because of its powerful physique, the APBT requires an owner who will carefully socialize and obedience train the dog.
and
Note: Although some level of dog aggression is characteristic of this breed, handlers will be expected to comply with UKC policy regarding dog temperament at UKC events.
Keep in mind as well that while the AKC and some amstaff breeders claim that their dogs have been bred away from their fighting heritage (and according to some, dog aggression), there were amstaffs that were used for their original function as a fighting dog as late as the 1970s, and some still have that heritage fairly recently in their pedigree. You may increase the odds of getting a fairly dog tolerant amstaff by selecting one from a breeder whose dogs are dog friendly, but that is no guarantee, and I would avoid breeders who are unfamiliar with, or deny the effects of the breed's history as a fighting dog.

Just as small terriers which were used in the past for vermin eradication would be expected to retain an increased propensity and ability to eradicate vermin, breeds used extensively (and bred selectively) for fighting should be expected to still retain a propensity and ability to fight with other dogs more readily and effectively than a "generic" dog.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top