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I have a lurcher, a Chi, and a kitten. Kitten likes to run, lurcher likes to chase, Chi can’t be bothered with either running or chasing. 😁

But.

That does mean the lurcher gets to chase the cat. She doesn’t. We play Chase the Treat instead, so she has that need met, and she doesn’t feel the need to chase the kitten. You could do the same with a toy, a ball & launcher etc.

I think you need to separate them and go back to Square 1. Whoever was here last has their own room, with everything they need - comfy bed, toys, quality time with you, while the other has the rest of the house (and quality time with you). You could swap them on alternate days, so that the one who was confined to one room one day, has the rest of the house the next, and vice versa.

Do NOT let them see each other at all for about a week. Meanwhile, as per the link, take an item from the cat (a bed, a collar, a toy) and give it to the dog to sniff, and vice versa.

Then open the door of the confined pet’s room - just a crack, so the can see each other and smell each other, but can’t get to each other. You could also use a fly screen or a baby gate, if preferred.

Focus on the dog, watch her body language, and praise/reward for calmness. If she makes any move towards the cat, move her away from the door, with a “let’s go”, praise and reward. Keep sessions short, but slowly build them up. And yes, keep the dog on lead for these introductions.

If you have someone available to help you, that would be ideal - have one person concentrating on the cat, while you work with your dog. You need to reward the cat for being calm/associating the dog with good things as well as the dog seeing the cat as a good thing. When the dog stops showing signs of wanting to chase the cat, and/or being calm around the cat, then you can allow them to interact freely - but again, keep sessions short and sweet and build up.

If, at any point in the reintroduction, one of the animals don’t seem happy/relaxed, or the dog stares or lunges for the cat, then go back a step or two for a couple more days.

Again, if you have someone who can be an accomplice and keep one entertained while you concentrate on the other, that would be ideal, but I had to manage it alone, so the kitten got a treat dispenser while I fed the dogs (aka the girls) treats for ignoring him.

We’re about 6wks in, and they’re interacting freely most of the time now, (Twice this afternoon, Kaylus the kitten ran straight past Milly the lurcher, and she didn’t move a muscle) but they’re still separated when I go out.

Always, always feed them separately. I feed my Lurcher in the bedroom, the cat in the living room, and the Chihuahua in the hall. They’re allowed to finish their own meals in peace, while I’m busy tidying up, replenishing water bowls, emptying the litter trays etc. Once they’re finished, their bowls are removed before they’re allowed back together.

DO get rid of the prong and the e-collars.
DO take it at the animals’ pace and try not to rush it.
DO remind yourself that it won’t be forever. ;)
DO keep the dog on a leash until you’re confident she won’t chase the cat.
DO redirect that chase instinct onto something more acceptable - such as a tennis ball.

DON’T rush it. It’s the animals that set the pace here, not us.
 
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