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Discussion Starter #1
I own a Jack Russell girl already, but I really want another dog, the hard part is to decide what breed to get
I was dead into Czechoslovakian vlcak until I realized that there are only three breeders in my country, and after having contacted every single one of them without a single respond, I kinda gave up
After my dreams where crushed and shattered (Sarcasm is a wonderful thing, isn't it?), I started to look into getting a Pembroke Welsh Corgi (I know, Czech Wolfdog to a Corgi? I've got a large variety of taste in dogs), but it just didn't sit right.
I love Corgis, but I really want a large dog.

I know getting a dog is something I should decide on my own, but I wanted to get some advice on what breed might fit me, get an outside opinion, you know?

So here's some info about me;
I'm very active, I love to go out for walks, and love to swim with my Jack Russell. I absolutely adore nature, and It's important that my dog should be able to run lose without a leash
I live in a big house with a big yard in the middle of nowhere, surrounded by woods and lovely big fields
I have an online job, so I have all the time in the world to raise a dog, and wouldn't have to leave my puppy alone
I do have some other animals, like cats, rats, and of course another dog, so it's important that the puppy doesn't have too much of a preydrive

Remember that this is mostly for fun, to see what dog people think suits me, but I might get some good suggestions too, who knows?
 

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Maybe a Czech or DDR GSD might be an idea. Both are real working line dogs and would need a firm hand of sorts. I only mention this because of your mention of a Vlcak which somewhat matches up with the two GSDs I mentioned regarding temperament. I suppose a tamed down version of all three would be a WGSL GSD.

Your situation with being able to spend 24/7 raising the dog would be a huge plus in my breed selections because they generally require a seriously committed handler or do best in that type of situation.

You know, a Malinois might be a possible candidate as well.

Best of luck in your journey and pursuits to a new addition to your pack.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Maybe a Czech or DDR GSD might be an idea. Both are real working line dogs and would need a firm hand of sorts. I only mention this because of your mention of a Vlcak which somewhat matches up with the two GSDs I mentioned regarding temperament. I suppose a tamed down version of all three would be a WGSL GSD.

Your situation with being able to spend 24/7 raising the dog would be a huge plus in my breed selections because they generally require a seriously committed handler or do best in that type of situation.

You know, a Malinois might be a possible candidate as well.

Best of luck in your journey and pursuits to a new addition to your pack.
Czech GSD is something I've definitively have been thinking about!
But there are so many different types of breeds, and even mixed breeds that it gets very hard to decide
I want to consider every possible breed before I make a decision, but that's hardly possible
 

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You could volunteer at a shelter and get familiar with different kinds of dogs. Descriptions online can be different than experiencing 'the real dog'.
 

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It is difficult to recommend a breed because your place sounds like a dream for so many breeds in FCI1 (herders) and FCI2 (stockier cattle and guard dogs) groups and there may be suitable dogs also in other FCI breed groups.

If you really want a vlcak you could check breeders also in other Nordic countries. Depending where you are located, travelling to the neighboring country may be less than a trip to the other end of your own country. But vlcak sounds also very demanding breed so you should probably get very familiar with them in real life before considering one.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
It is difficult to recommend a breed because your place sounds like a dream for so many breeds in FCI1 (herders) and FCI2 (stockier cattle and guard dogs) groups and there may be suitable dogs also in other FCI breed groups.

If you really want a vlcak you could check breeders also in other Nordic countries. Depending where you are located, travelling to the neighboring country may be less than a trip to the other end of your own country. But vlcak sounds also very demanding breed so you should probably get very familiar with them in real life before considering one.
I know a lot about Czech Vlcak, but I have never met one irl before because of how unusual the breed is
Although I wouldn't mind going to a neighboring country, I would like to consider other breeds before I do that, encase there are breeds that I have totally overlooked that would fit perfectly with me and my lifestyle (That hopefully are a little more common and easier to get to than a Czech Vlcak)

Are there any specific breeds you would like to recommend, if you have past experience with them, or just think they sound like a nice dog?
 

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You sound like an amazing home for an Aussie or Border Collie!
 

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Given time isn't a problem- how much training/how intense a dog do you actually want? If you're attracted to the idea of an intense dog, do you have any ideas of activities you'd like to do?

Breeds that come to mind:
- Belgian Shepherds (Malenois, Groenendael, Turvuren)
I think in Europe they haven't been segregated into different breeds as much the way they have in America, so they tend to pop up out of the same lines, at least in the case of Mals and Turvurens, not 100% sure if the Groenendael does also. Choosing a breeder who can help match you with a lower drive/energy/less intense pup might also be a good choice unless you have plans to participate in some kind of sport.
- German Shepherds
Given you're in Sweden you'd have access to some nice European lines, I'd bet, and could stay away from the low drive, walk-on-their-metatarsals show lines. A working line GSD would be a FUN dog for someone who is home all the time
- Border Collie
- Aussie
- Kelpie (though I don't know how common they are in Sweden, though)
- German Shorthair Pointer
I know these guys tend to be VERY popular with people who like to hike, they're supposedly really great hiking companions and have a really fun energy level. They're getting more popular around me, lately, and I've loved every one I've met.
- Visla
These are THE jogging companion around me, and also seem to be really popular hiking/nature dogs.
- Aussie Cattle Dog
Don't know how popular these guys are in Sweden, but IMO they're really fun companion dogs and are very Jack Russel-like in their temperaments. From what I've seen, they almost always end up at least dog selective as adults, if not downright dog reactive, though, so that is something to keep in mind.
- Weimeraner
Similar to the Point/Visla; another fun dog for a nature-goer, and they have a very fun bouncey energy about them, plus they're a beautiful color. Again don't know how popular they are in Sweden.
- Doberman
- Rottweiler

Given you will be home for so much of the day, it might be a good idea to do some training to get the dog used to being alone, even if it requires going out of your way to leave the house when you otherwise might not, because most of the breeds I mentioned can be prone to separation anxiety and it is a pain to have a dog used to someone being home 24/7 and then have your situation change and end up with a dog who can't be alone because it never learned how to.

Also, most of those breeds would benefit from/ be easier to live with doing some kind of 'job', whether that be a sport that you guys practice in the back yard or trick training or what have you.
 

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Moonstream: Groenendaels can have Tervueren puppies because Groes are usually dominant black and can thus carry non-black which in this breed is masked sable. I have heard of some study where BSDs were DNA tested and they found recessive black in them too. If it exists in the breed, two Tervuerens carrying it could get a black puppy - which would be registered as Groenendael by our kennel club. I assume the Swedish kennel club would do the same. I don't know about the Swedish kennel club but in the Finnish kennel club some variety crossings are nowadays allowed (Malinois x Tervueren, Tervueren x Groenendael, and Malinois x Laekenois).

When I read the OP for the first time, a picture of a Malinois flashed into my eyes. Although regarding FCI1 breeds and especially those bred for work (ie herding or schutzhund) it might be good to have some interest towards dog sports like obedience, agility, or tracking. These dogs truly enjoy when they get the chance to use their heads.

So...
Belgian, German or Dutch shepherd
Australian cattle dog
Finnish reindeer herder (more independent, I believe)
Hungarian mudi and Croatian shepherd (smallish, owners say that you either hate them or love them)
Chodsky pes
Really, there are many European herding breeds, not all are even registered by the kennel clubs
Beauceron...
Smooth collie (calmer and easier to handle than the more intense herders)
East European Shepherd (VEO)
 

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Yeah, I didn't think to mention Mudis or Beauceron because I've always been under the impression that they both do best in a home that has gotten them with the intention of doing some kind of dog sports, which the OP didn't mention. I don't feel like I've heard of a whole lot of lower drive Mudis or Beace, but I guess they probably do exist and I may just not have heard of them because those are two fairly uncommon breeds in the USA still. I would one day like a Mudi as a sport dog, though, I think- I love the blue merle color the breed has and they have a pretty cool coat texture. Cool to know about the Belgian Sheps. And how could I forget Dutchies! Very few things are more striking than a really stripey, brindle-y Dutch Shepherd.

Another one I just though of, though they're probably a little on the small size of what you're interested in, is a Pyrean Shepherd. Small but really striking little dogs- like big dogs in a little body, from what I've read.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Given time isn't a problem- how much training/how intense a dog do you actually want? If you're attracted to the idea of an intense dog, do you have any ideas of activities you'd like to do?

Breeds that come to mind:
- Belgian Shepherds (Malenois, Groenendael, Turvuren)
I think in Europe they haven't been segregated into different breeds as much the way they have in America, so they tend to pop up out of the same lines, at least in the case of Mals and Turvurens, not 100% sure if the Groenendael does also. Choosing a breeder who can help match you with a lower drive/energy/less intense pup might also be a good choice unless you have plans to participate in some kind of sport.
- German Shepherds
Given you're in Sweden you'd have access to some nice European lines, I'd bet, and could stay away from the low drive, walk-on-their-metatarsals show lines. A working line GSD would be a FUN dog for someone who is home all the time
- Border Collie
- Aussie
- Kelpie (though I don't know how common they are in Sweden, though)
- German Shorthair Pointer
I know these guys tend to be VERY popular with people who like to hike, they're supposedly really great hiking companions and have a really fun energy level. They're getting more popular around me, lately, and I've loved every one I've met.
- Visla
These are THE jogging companion around me, and also seem to be really popular hiking/nature dogs.
- Aussie Cattle Dog
Don't know how popular these guys are in Sweden, but IMO they're really fun companion dogs and are very Jack Russel-like in their temperaments. From what I've seen, they almost always end up at least dog selective as adults, if not downright dog reactive, though, so that is something to keep in mind.
- Weimeraner
Similar to the Point/Visla; another fun dog for a nature-goer, and they have a very fun bouncey energy about them, plus they're a beautiful color. Again don't know how popular they are in Sweden.
- Doberman
- Rottweiler

Given you will be home for so much of the day, it might be a good idea to do some training to get the dog used to being alone, even if it requires going out of your way to leave the house when you otherwise might not, because most of the breeds I mentioned can be prone to separation anxiety and it is a pain to have a dog used to someone being home 24/7 and then have your situation change and end up with a dog who can't be alone because it never learned how to.

Also, most of those breeds would benefit from/ be easier to live with doing some kind of 'job', whether that be a sport that you guys practice in the back yard or trick training or what have you.

Thank you for all the great suggestions!

I'm not really interested in doing any sort of sports or agility training, but I definitively want a smart dog so I can teach him some tricks

I'm gonna have to look them up a little more about these dogs, because some of them aren't that familiar to me
I've definitively been thinking about some kind of German Shepherd though, I think they are so beautiful, the only turn off is how destructive they can be as puppies, but that shouldn't really be a problem either since I can be outside with him pretty much all day
 

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Honestly you'd be pretty hard pressed to find a smart, active, medium/medium-large breed that doesn't have a tendency to be destructive as a young 'un.

Definitely decide how much training you actually want to do- some of the breed I mentioned really need a training outlet, whether that be some kind of sport like agility, flyball, or disk dog tricks, or something like organized trick training, etc. Some dogs will have more laid back lines/some lower drive puppies mixed in with their litters- like working line GSD, which can have very varying drives.

If you're not specifically interested in doing an organized sport (even just practicing it) I'd be weary of Pyrenean Shepherds, Mudis, and any working line Belgian, Dutch, or German Shepherd. The first two more than the last three, though, since like I said in the German/Belgian/Dutch Sheps there are some lower drive pups (not low drive, but not crazy high drive either) born into working line litters, and especially for the GSD and Belgians I think there does tend to be some separation between pure working lines, multi purpose working/show lines, and just bench/show lines, with the dogs being bred with more of an eye toward confirmation likely producing more not-crazy-high-drive-need-a-job pups than pure working lines. I think Beauceron would be fine given you have so much free time, but they definitely are a step up from just a pet dog, IMO.

Definitely try to get out and see the breeds you're interested in- see what their temperament is like, their drive, and if they have an energy you could live with.
 

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I think Mudis and Belgian shepherds and Border Collies are around same levels in their training and exercise requirements.

I personally do not want a BSD only bred for shows. If it is a lazy coach potato it is not a Belgian nor is an overenergetic nerv-wreck showing any remnants of original working capacity. I'd check out a breeder who does some sport with their dogs although it might be better to skip those who breed the most intense IPO dogs.

My parents have a 8 months old GSD x BSD and that dog is crazy. She has the capacity to focus of a fly and desperately needs training and energy outlet. I think getting her was not a good idea for my mom who only wanted a dog to keep watch and the only exercise is walks and sometimes off-leash time. She is not destructive when people are at home but she counter-surfs, barks, jumps at people, is leash reactive, tries to chase cars, and in general does not sit still for a second.

But if she gets some training or calms down when she matures, she'll be as good as our late Tervs (who likely were show line, although I have no idea) and they were the best dogs once they grew up from the awful teenager phase.

My rough collie has been the easiest dog ever. I bet there are collie breeders of both coat varieties in Sweden who at least temperament tests their dogs, if not doings sports like obedience, agility, or tracking/search. Alva being easy also means that there is no challenge. She is a nice dog but she does not test my skill or give me much experience. But that was originally what I wanted too. Life with her is easy in my environment.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Honestly you'd be pretty hard pressed to find a smart, active, medium/medium-large breed that doesn't have a tendency to be destructive as a young 'un.

Definitely decide how much training you actually want to do- some of the breed I mentioned really need a training outlet, whether that be some kind of sport like agility, flyball, or disk dog tricks, or something like organized trick training, etc. Some dogs will have more laid back lines/some lower drive puppies mixed in with their litters- like working line GSD, which can have very varying drives.

If you're not specifically interested in doing an organized sport (even just practicing it) I'd be weary of Pyrenean Shepherds, Mudis, and any working line Belgian, Dutch, or German Shepherd. The first two more than the last three, though, since like I said in the German/Belgian/Dutch Sheps there are some lower drive pups (not low drive, but not crazy high drive either) born into working line litters, and especially for the GSD and Belgians I think there does tend to be some separation between pure working lines, multi purpose working/show lines, and just bench/show lines, with the dogs being bred with more of an eye toward confirmation likely producing more not-crazy-high-drive-need-a-job pups than pure working lines. I think Beauceron would be fine given you have so much free time, but they definitely are a step up from just a pet dog, IMO.

Definitely try to get out and see the breeds you're interested in- see what their temperament is like, their drive, and if they have an energy you could live with.
I think you misunderstood me a little bit, I want a dog that is a challenge, and I do have some agility things on my yard, I just never use them because my JRT got bored of them when she grew up
I want a dog that I can devote my everything to, a really high maintenance, active, crazy dog who I can take out to run with in the woods and on the fields
I really love to teach dogs tricks, my JRT know them all, she's a real circus dog
I am also willing to try some sports if I feel like my dog needs it, I actually competed with my older JRT boy in agility (Who I sadly couldn't keep, so he lives with my mom now)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I think Mudis and Belgian shepherds and Border Collies are around same levels in their training and exercise requirements.

I personally do not want a BSD only bred for shows. If it is a lazy coach potato it is not a Belgian nor is an overenergetic nerv-wreck showing any remnants of original working capacity. I'd check out a breeder who does some sport with their dogs although it might be better to skip those who breed the most intense IPO dogs.

My parents have a 8 months old GSD x BSD and that dog is crazy. She has the capacity to focus of a fly and desperately needs training and energy outlet. I think getting her was not a good idea for my mom who only wanted a dog to keep watch and the only exercise is walks and sometimes off-leash time. She is not destructive when people are at home but she counter-surfs, barks, jumps at people, is leash reactive, tries to chase cars, and in general does not sit still for a second.

But if she gets some training or calms down when she matures, she'll be as good as our late Tervs (who likely were show line, although I have no idea) and they were the best dogs once they grew up from the awful teenager phase.

My rough collie has been the easiest dog ever. I bet there are collie breeders of both coat varieties in Sweden who at least temperament tests their dogs, if not doings sports like obedience, agility, or tracking/search. Alva being easy also means that there is no challenge. She is a nice dog but she does not test my skill or give me much experience. But that was originally what I wanted too. Life with her is easy in my environment.
It's a little strange, because the puppy you just described should be a huge turnoff, but that sound exactly like the kind of dog I want.
I love it when they have so much energy they practically explode with it.
Which is what I was aiming for when I got a JRT, but I was a little unlucky because she is the laziest JRT I've ever met, she didn't really test my limits in the way I wanted her to.
I can't really complain though, she's the sweetest dog I know (even if she can get pretty grumpy when she's sleepy)

My mom actually owns a smooth collie, so I do have some experience with them, but they're a little too calm and easy for what I'm looking for
They are lovely though, my moms collie is very well behaved, and intelligent
 

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Heh, we seem to have similar taste in dogs! I would never change Alva and she is exactly what I asked for when I got her because my situation demanded an easy dog and I can sort of value life with a dog who causes no worry, at least regarding her behavior. She is a perfect pet at home but it is also a pleasure to try different sports with her because she lights up when she gets a chance to chase balls or eat treats.

I like the monster puppy too although I wish I could have had her so I could have set her to the right tracks from the very beginning. Now she has developed or is developing some bad habits and it is less fun to root them off than to draw on a tabula rasa. I am going to dog-sit her for a couple of days this week and I wait for that with a slight feeling of horror. All training efforts I'll pour on that dog to manage her while I'm looking after her will likely have washed out when I meet the pup again.
 

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It sounds like a Malinois, working line GSD, BSD, or sport bred Border Collie would be right up your alley. I think a herding bred BC would have too much calm focus/energy for you. But the sport bred ones, they're freaking nuts.
 

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If that's what you want, I agree with the above suggestions of working line GSD, Mal, BSD, or sport bred (or working line, IMO, although it will be a slightly different ballgame with the herding drive) Border Collie! Your situation sounds like my dream!
 
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