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My boyfriend and I have a 4 month old boston terrier named Odin. I have grown up with dogs my entire life. However, having my own with my boyfriend, he has turned me into someone who over worries about my pup and I'm starting to feel like we have coddled him way to much. He has slept in our bed since he was 2 months old (without any accidents), he sits on our laps whenever he wants. Parvo has been so bad where we lived so we rarely took him outside before his shots where done. He loves to go on walks but once the wind hits him, he's done (which is pretty much a 2 minute walk and I end up dragging him). We always pick him up and carry him if we take him to the car or when I go from my car to my work. Whenever he is bored, lyes down and looks sad, we go out of our way to play with him (even if we just played with him for an hour). If either of us walk out of a room, he gets so upset and concerned. My dogs in the past have never been this way.

How do I correct this without him becoming depressed because he is already very clingy. Is it too late? I just want him have better habits. I'm so scared to change the way I act and he becomes sad or unhappy. I know I need to remember he is just a dog. How do I get out of this "over protective/worry" phase but still know that what I am doing is okay?
 

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It might be a good idea to practice "away" time if he's that clingy, because they can develop into separation anxiety. Is he ever away? Does he panic if you leave him with someone else? (If you ever have). Otherwise some dogs are snugglier and clingier than others. Many small dogs or lapdogs can be more clingy than large dogs because they were bred as companions and sometimes need human attention more.
 
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I would work on slowly spending more time away from him, as was brought up, you don't want him to come down w separation anxiety, that would be awful. Leave him alone for a few minutes at a time, slowly increasing it until he can be left alone reliably for any length of time(w/in reason of course, I mean a few hours at most at his age). Leave things for him to be distracted by, stuff for him to play w and chew on, etc. He will be a bit sad at first, but you just need to tell yourself that it's for his own good. Trust me, you REALLY don't want a dog w bad separation anxiety, it's truly miserable for both dog and human, so nip this in the bud while you still have a chance.
It sounds like you take great care of him, maybe coddle him a little bit ...but that's better than the other way around, certainly.
Sounds like you need to work on leash walking a bit though. It's important that a dog be able to walk on a leash for exercise and transportation and so many reasons really. I don't have really any experience training dogs who won't go forward on the lead, so I may be out of line here (someone feel free to correct me if I am) -- but what does he do if after he's started refusing to walk you drop the leash(but lay it close to you so you can put your foot on it if he tries to run), walk a few feet and call him in a happy and excited voice to come to you, perhaps even w a treat in your hand? May be something to try to see if you can get him going. I would not get him used to being carried when he refuses to walk.
Enjoy coddling your puppy, we've all been guilty of it at one point or another. Just don't spoil him too badly (which it doesn't sound like you are) and you'll have a great companion for many years to come.
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If he can be by himself without barking the entire time you are gone, destroying stuff because he's paranoid (not normal puppy "fun"), etc, then he's alright with the amount of attention you are giving him, but I'd still practice letting him have time away from y'all. If however he is doing any of that then you are going to have to actively work on separation anxiety.

Please remember you don't have to entertain him all the time. It's alright, even healthy, to let him play by himself. If you go to him every time he cries and barks then you are teaching him that that's how he gets you to come back and that is NOT a good thing! If you know he's been fed, pottied, and exercised, then ignore him when he cries for you to come back, wait until he has quit acting up then go towards him, if he cries or barks then stop and ignore him, when he's quiet again go towards him. Keep doing that till you can go to him while he's quiet. Do that every time he's acting upset that you left the room, and do not give in to the noise. If you give in to the noise you teach him that if he cries long enough and loud enough you will go to him. The lesson you want him to learn is that his being quiet is what get you to go to him, his being noisy is what gets you to stay away.
 
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