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Hello, I'm planning on getting a dog and have narrowed the breeds down to havapoos and cavapoos. I know they aren't technically breeds. There is an amazing havapoo available very soon but I'm concerned about her being much more active than and bark more than most cavapoos. In a sense, I've gotten the feeling from many dog websites that they are prone to "small dog syndrome". I was initially drawn to the cavapoo because of their sweet and loyal personality where they can run in the park but still lay with you on the couch. I'm a bit biased as I have an adorable and sweet cavalier. I know that not all dogs Hit The stereotype of breed but I'm just saying generally. Would the havapoo need more excersise than and bark more than the cavapoo? Do most have that gentile, loving, relaxed yet still able to run around personality? If it helps, the havapoo will be around ten pounds and the cavapoo will be closer to thirteen or fourteen.
 

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I honestly don't know much about havanese crosses but finding a good crossbreed breeder could be quite difficult. Cavaliers in particular can suffer from some really nasty congenital conditions (heart problems, syringomyelia) that good breeders try to eliminate through responsible breeding like carrying out health tests and careful selection of parents. Good breeders do tests on their breeding dogs (proper tests, not just checks to say the dog is capable of siring/carrying a litter) to breed out these conditions. Unfortunately with the popularity of these crosses there are many puppy farmers/ puppy mills who are more interested in exploiting buyers than the long term health of the puppies they are selling; and pet owners who think it would be lovely to have mini versions of their own pets but lack the understanding of responsible breeding.

It used to be believed that crossbreeds had the best of both breeds and health problems were 'bred out' but in fact you could well get a puppy who has inherited health defects from both parents. So crossing, for example, a cavalier with a poodle, you could get a puppy who has heart problems from the cavalier side and hip dysplasia from the poodle side. Both sides could have eye problems these could cause long term pain and distress to the dog and the owner to incur on going expensive vet bills. Marilyn Munro allegedly once suggested to Albert Einstein that if they had babies they would be amazing with her beauty and his brains. Einstein allegedly replied how awful it would be if it were the other way round. You get the picture!

There are some responsible breeders of crossbreeds and that is a good thing. But they are very few and you may have to search extensively to find one.

Have you considered a purebred poodle? It would be far easier to find a responsible breeder, and they can be left in a shaggy clip if it is the look of the traditional clip that puts you off. They are smart, friendly, trainable little dogs that give you the the qualities you want with far less risk of the problems if you research breeders.
 

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To me a cross is a cross.. No fancy name makes it any better or worse than any other pet dog.

Whatever you decide be aware you are paying for fashion. As regards traits or personality it could go either way.

We had a cross Bouvier des Flanders /St Bernard. He was the only black pup with a full tail in a litter of 12.
As he grew he looked Bouvier but with the build of a St B, he was gentle and most likely less 'ón guard ' than many Bouviers but if pushed or if he felt the need to protect us he had the build and weight of the St B to more than make his point.

Bouviers are generally considered hypoallegenic/low to non shedding but Max was a constant shedder our house was always cover in huge clumps of coarse hair that rolled like tumbleweed with any draught.
St B's tend to drool but Max didnt...

The truth is with any cross you just do not know what you are getting...
 

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I know what you mean about the difficulty in finding a reputable breeder. I must have called like 30 and lots seemed very fishy or refused give me the health info. I have extensively looks into poodles and even found a good breeder with some available that I liked but in the end, I realized that I couldn't keep up with their energy or barking. And about the crossbreeds, I understand that they might take 90 percent or more after one parent or the other which is why I narrowed the search down to these two dogs. The cavapoo doesn't seem likely to fall on either extreme. I was just wondering about the havapoo. Even with purebreds, it is difficult to predict the personality of an individual dog but there is usually an average.
 

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Sorry, what I meant was that I have asked our member Dogslife to comment. By putting the @ in front of his name, he should get a nudge to join the thread.
 

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Hello, I'm planning on getting a dog and have narrowed the breeds down to havapoos and cavapoos. I know they aren't technically breeds. There is an amazing havapoo available very soon but I'm concerned about her being much more active than and bark more than most cavapoos. In a sense, I've gotten the feeling from many dog websites that they are prone to "small dog syndrome". I was initially drawn to the cavapoo because of their sweet and loyal personality where they can run in the park but still lay with you on the couch. I'm a bit biased as I have an adorable and sweet cavalier. I know that not all dogs Hit The stereotype of breed but I'm just saying generally. Would the havapoo need more excersise than and bark more than the cavapoo? Do most have that gentile, loving, relaxed yet still able to run around personality? If it helps, the havapoo will be around ten pounds and the cavapoo will be closer to thirteen or fourteen.
Thanks @JoanneF. I wouldn't have seen this thread if you hadn't mentioned me.

I am, perhaps, uniquely qualified to talk about this. I have personally had two "long term" dogs. One of them was a poodle and one of them was a cocker spaniel.

What I can say for sure is that each dog is different. Each dog has its own personality and the differences between individuals is greater than the differences between breeds. I am an expert in two specific dogs but I'm not an expert in any other way.

Neither of the dogs I had were barkers. Obviously both of them barked but there was always a reason for it. My current dog (the poodle) will go out on the balcony and bark at his "friends" as they walk past, particularly if they are barking too. To make him stop I go out on the balcony too and ask him, "what's up... are you barking at your friends?" and then say "en.. klaar" (Dutch for "and done"). At that point he stops.

The point here is that you can train a dog to stop barking, to a large extent, on command.

As for exercise: the spaniel needed a lot of exercise. We used to just leave the front door of the house open so that the dog could go outside on its own initiative. She spent a large part of the day outside and I'm not actually sure how much exercise she got. I am, however, much more attuned to the amount of exercise our poodle gets.

Poodles (as a breed) need a royal fuc-ton of exercise. We walk our poodle 4 times a day on most days. He runs with my wife, 5km a day at a minimum. We walk him at least once for an hour or more and play fetch with him for a while, either with sticks or balls. We also hire a walking service to take him once or sometimes twice a week to walk in a pack for several hours and in the weekends we walk him for 12km or more at least once off leash. This, we have discovered, is pretty much the minimal amount of exercise he needs in order to be content.

I don't relate to "small dog syndome" in the very least. I don't think that "small dog syndrome" is really a thing. What I believe is that you need to "tune in" to the needs of your dog and try your best to give the dog what he/she needs in order to be content. If you do that then any dog you choose will be fine.
 

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Ours is a poodle/bischon mix, IMO a perfect mix. We have had her for over ten years, great dog, companion, and just good company.
 

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We've had toy poodles and yorkipoos. Both are said to be high barkers but our poodles hardly ever barked and our Yorkipoo only barks when someone's at the door. After we had our third child she increased her barking a little bit if someone she didn't know or didn't say hi to her first and tried to approach our kids.
 
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