Dog Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a 5 year old cockapoo. I always brushed her teeth a few times a month since she was a puppy. The vet told me a few months ago she had gingivitis and he put he on antibiotics and told me to brush/use a mouthwash. I've been trying to keep up with it and recently started doing it once daily. She HATES it to the point where it seems like it might hurt a little and her breath smells bad. I feed her a combo of wet and dry organic dog food. The problem areas are only her front teeth. Two of her bottom teeth are a little loose. All other teeth are fine.

I'm hoping someone can tell me if I should keep brushing/using mouthwash and it will get better or if she needs to have her teeth cleaned by a vet and go on antibiotics again. I had her to the vet over the summer and showed him her teeth and he said they were not bad enough just yet to do the cleaning.

See pictures







Any and all advice is greatly appreciated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,884 Posts
It looks like she needs to have a dental at the vet under anesthesia and have some teeth pulled. She has significant gum recession, and it's starting to expose the roots of the teeth. There's tarter between them, resulting in decay.

Unfortunately dog teeth are like humans....Some of us have genetically good teeth and hardly ever get cavities. Others have genetically bad teeth and can't even look at sugar without getting a cavity no matter how many times we brush.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,820 Posts
Overall they don't look horrible, but if some are loose they likely need to be removed and it's probably where the smell is coming from. How do the back teeth look? A lot of the time the front ones will look O.K. but the molars are bad.

What do you mean by mouthwash? Is it one prescribed by the vet?

Once you figure out if any need to be removed by the vet you can start giving her Raw, they have to be raw, meaty bones to help keep her teeth clean. Depending on her size give her either turkey necks, or chicken wings, backs or necks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thank you very much for all the feedback! I am calling a different vet today as mine said they were not bad enough for a professional cleaning when I brought her at the end of the summer.

Her back teeth are totally fine which is the odd part! It is really only her front teeth that have an issue. So feeding her raw bones like that will really help keep her teeth clean? She loves bones so she would not complain about that! She weighs 11 lbs so how many should I give her per week?

The mouthwash I am using is from her vet. It's supposed to prevent tarter build up. The name of it is Virbac Animal Health Oral Hygiene rinse...see link below:

Virbac Animal Health C.E.T. Oral Hygiene Rinse|Chlorhexidine Rinse

I wish they made some kind of antibacterial mouthwash for dogs. I've tried a drinking water additive that is supposed to help but then she doesn't drink her water bec she can taste it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,884 Posts
Virbac is good stuff. Another good brand for oral hygiene stuff is Tropiclean.

Yeah her teeth really don't sound that bad on the whole. But those front teeth do need to be pulled, especially if they're loose :\ I imagine it's causing some discomfort too. They're just going to continue to decay until they fall out completely, and having all that nasty bacteria living in there can lead to gum issues.

Raw bones definitely do help. I've been feeding a completely raw diet for 8 years now. My chihuahua mix was switched to this diet when she was 6. She's 14 now and aside from a chip and a few missing, her teeth are fabulous. Very minimal tarter. My GSD was switched to raw when she was about 2. She has absolutely no tarter. My youngest is 5 and has been on raw since he was 5 months old. His teeth are still pretty white, and tarter is very minimal since he's bad about actually chewing his food. But I imagine all of their teeth would be much worse if I had them on kibble and didn't do some kind of brushing routine.

Also, I have a cat that I switched to raw. He actually had some tarter build up. After 6 weeks on raw, it all came off all on it's own. It probably saved me from having to do a dental on him in the future since he had tarter build up at such a young age.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Very interesting with the raw diet. I had Willow on a raw diet when I got her at 8 weeks until around 2 years. It got expensive so I switched to an organic wet/dry food combo.

I'm curious if you have suggestions on raw food brands that are reasonably priced. I'd be 100% open to switching back as I know it has so many amazing health benefits. Thanks!

I also made a vet apt to have her exam done and blood work to set her up for the cleaning...I can't wait to hear the damage done to my wallet, but she is so worth it <3
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
290 Posts
I'd just go with PMR if you're looking at raw that will actually help with the teeth. It's the bones and act of biting them that removes tartar and keeps the mouth healthy. Premade raw foods like patties have, at best, very tiny ground pieces of bone which won't do anything to help clean the teeth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,884 Posts
Very interesting with the raw diet. I had Willow on a raw diet when I got her at 8 weeks until around 2 years. It got expensive so I switched to an organic wet/dry food combo.

I'm curious if you have suggestions on raw food brands that are reasonably priced. I'd be 100% open to switching back as I know it has so many amazing health benefits. Thanks!

I also made a vet apt to have her exam done and blood work to set her up for the cleaning...I can't wait to hear the damage done to my wallet, but she is so worth it <3
I agree that raw food brands are very expensive.

I do prey model raw (PMR). My meat is all purchased from the grocery store, or butcher. I've also received free meat from hunters, and I sometimes buy or am given live animals to be used as meat (chickens, turkeys, ducks, and rabbits mostly).

It's much cheaper this way. I'm able to get chicken for sometimes as low as 49 cents/lb, pork as low as 89c/lb. Most of the time I'm able to keep it under $2/lb, often less, on average.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
368 Posts
from what is visible in photos, cleanliness is not the issue... exposed roots and periodontal disease is. Those two severely affected incisors will need to be removed (no saving teeth with that degree of recession). Incisors are often at risk of this problem aside from diet concerns... genetics can be a problem, but so can excessive grooming (hair gets wound around the tooth bases and causes gingival recession and tooth loss)... no hair in photos, but may have been there before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
One thing on the recessed gums, be sure not to brush her teeth too hard. I did this to myself, and damaged my gums over the years. It's also possible to brush away the outer layer of enamel. Apparently both are very common (especially for those of us who had braces as we think we need to scrub).

Your dog's teeth are so white, I'd wonder if the gums have been pushed back from the brushing - maybe ask your vet when you're there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,393 Posts
I am a real believer in daily brushing. I brush Samantha's teeth every morning. When she was 3, her teeth were heavily tartar coated. Our Vet cleaned them, but the process was so hard on Samantha, I vowed to do whatever I could to substantially delay or eliminate the need for her to go through that again. She is now seven years old, the Vet checks her teeth and says they are great, and need no intervention. Her teeth look good, very white and clean, and her breath is good. I think the reality is genetics are a factor, just as it is in humans, but I do know that our routine does keep the tartar at bay, at least a significant % of it.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top