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I really need to rant and I don't know if any of you have experienced similar situations. I have been training my Kelpie puppy to not jump on people when he greets them. At home, we have been ignoring and avoiding eye contact with him as soon as he jumps onto us. If I'm sitting down and he jumps up, I stand up and take a step into his space so he feels uncomfortable enough to stop. He has been making tremendous progress until yesterday when a guest visited our house. He owns a kelpie too but he allows the dog to hump and jump on people. When his dog nips or bites, he just uses a stick to beat the dog and provides little positive reinforcement training or exercise.

So my puppy was excited to see him and I told the guest that he needs to stand up and ignore the dog as soon as the dog jumps onto him. Don't touch, make eye contact or say anything to the puppy. Guess what? As soon as my puppy jumps up, the guy starts patting and stroking him! Again, I asked the guest to stop patting and ignore but he picked the puppy up and let the dog sit on his lap!!! I never allow my puppy to sit on my lap until I say 'cuddle' and he happily comes over. That is the only time he is allowed to jump onto my couch/chair. I was so pissed because he kept on reinforcing my dog's jumping every time he jumped up on him.

I say the same thing to people on the streets who also seems to ignore what I tell them. Luckily, he is on leash so I just give him a correction and get him off people in time but they always say 'it's okay he is so cute' and continue to pat him when he is clearly trying to jump onto them again. Why don't these people just damn listen!
 

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Hmm, I think with your friends, there is not much that you can do to change their behaviour. My suggestion would be to put the dog in an exercise pen or outside before your friend arrived, that way the dog wouldn't have the chance to jump and have the behaviour reinforced. If the friend asks why the dog is not visiting, you can let him know that you are currently working on behaviours and don't want guests to accidentally reinforce the wrong thing. You can explain what you are trying to do and add the caveat that if the friend wants to help you work on the behaviours and would be willing to do x,y,z (ignore the dog when it jumps), then you would be happy to try. Structure the conversation as if it's about the dog learning and you not wanting to burden your friend with having to jump through your hoops to help train the dog.

Should the friend not follow through, grab the dog, and remove it to a quiet place. You can placate the friend with "oh sorry, dog is not really behaving and we seem to be reinforcing this behaviour. Let's give it a break and try later". Again, it's not about your friend not complying (except it is), but about your dog needing a break and a reset.

Finally, when walking, I never allow my puppy to run up to strangers and vice versa. Usually when strangers approach, focus my attention on the dog- I ask it to pay attention to me or do a short training exercise. This often deters people from coming over or slows them down. If they ignore my body language (which is clearly NOT saying "please come over and pet my dog without asking"), I shift my body so it's between the stranger and the dog. Often I will grab the dog's collar gently to remind it to keep it's feet on the ground. Should the dog jump, I offer a correction. Should the person say "it's ok", I firmly say "it's cute not, but won't be when she's older. Can't let her get away with it forever!". If a person asks to pet my dog (which is preferable), I say "only if all 4 paws are on the ground". My favourite people are the ones that ask to pet my dog.

If your dog jumps and you go to offer a correction, you can place your body between the well-meaning stranger and the dog, and then only move out of the way when the dog is calm. This creates a barrier so people can't keep trying to pet the dog while you are giving a correction.
 
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