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This Maverick he is half groendael and half husky. We got him at a year as a rescue. He had no training and was kept in a cage by the breeder. Looking for some training tips on his being over protective and biting. Dog Shelf Bookcase Dog breed Carnivore
 

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He is protecting me. He was terrified when we got him but quickly took to me. He walks great on leash, does well with coming and using whistle, basic commands, but he will go after people who come near me and bite their calves which I know is the Belgian sheepdog in him. He does guard food from cats and old lab so I pick it up. Basically growls barks if they come near food or even me. This last is more recent. We live in an rv right now full time so with close quarters it’s difficult to keep him away from me. I try to ignore him but that’s not working. I’ve tried socializing him, he’s good with other dogs most of the time but since the 15 year old lab is going downhill he has become aggressive towards her. He isn’t treat driven making it difficult in training. Overall the biting is the biggest problem
 

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Husky dogs are generally known as the worst dog breed for protection ... they let anybody in :) ( I have 2 GSD / Husky mixes) ... so I agree it's coming from the other side. You are getting a late start ... some remarks about the breed"

"Groenendael is a highly intelligent breed that has the potential to respond very well to training. These dogs do require a high degree of socialization, however, and it should be started at a very young age.... The Groenendael is an alert and sensitive breed – he always knows what’s going on around him and he can be very protective of his family and his territory. These dogs form very strong bonds with family and they can be very affectionate and playful as well. The Groenendael tends to get along well with other dogs and is generally friendly toward strangers"

They are a herding dog so their were specifically bred to protect. While personally a proponent of both positive and negative reinforcement (NR is not the same as punishment) because of this dog's genertics and eager to please nature, I'd presume that it would best not to align yourself on what they were specifically bred to do and, to my view, put the emphasis on demonstrating that you do not need protection.

You said "we" ... so, I'm going to conclude it's not just you and the dogs. Without more detail such as age, early life, etc can't offer much other than this.

For the most part male dogs, to my observations anyway, tend to be more protective of women than men. Society has not yet completely freed us from the male head of household stereotype but much of human behavior differs between the genders. That gap for many of the negative connotations is gratefully narrowing. But we do see difference in body language, vocal tones to which dogs respond in different ways. When I have encountered dogs that have been severely abused, most exhibit more fear indicators in response to men than with women.

When attempting to modify this behavior, you might try "flipping" the dynamic that many shelters use when introducing a new dog to the family pet. In this case, allow the shelter staff to hold your dogs leash and you take the potential adoptee's leash, walk the dog around ,issuing commends that your dog is familiar with ... this shows the dog you are safe, in control and new dog is no threat to you. Meanwhile the new dog sees that your dog is no threat to his handler and the new dog.

When meeting new people, let the other half of the "we" hold the dog on leash. Ask the person you are meeting to let you approach them rather than the other way around. Please note that this isn't a list of things to do in order but things you can "throw in" when the opportunity arises. Have your guest sit down before you do, shake hands (you standing).... bring food, when moving you lead.... essentially emulate the interactions that you have with your dog.

This is not you showing dominance over the new person, it' showing the dog that the person is no threat to you. When the dog appears to be ready to behave appropriately, signal the other half to approach and sit down such that the dog can not reach the new person but still in sight and close enough to get a good smell. If barking or other undesired behavior occurs, it is important that you ... (well the person who is not holding the leash) utter the commands you use to correct such behaviors (Quiet, heel, sit) whatever. When sitting down for your "tea and crumpets", have a small plate with doggie treats .. reward the dog when in ceases bad behavior letting you guest repeat the words, tone and reward.

Can also arrange with a friend to pass each other while walking the dogs.... stop , talk and move on ... let the dogs get close enough to do a sniff. On monday ... you toss both the dogs a treat or two assuming they are behaving... on Wednesday, let your friend do the rewarding. Be conscious of your body language and vocal tones. The more confident your stance and tone, the less threat the dog will assume exists. If you are passing someone and your nervous that your dog will behave badly, then, that may be interpreted as fear of the approaching person and doh may move to protect.

I can't speak from a position of familiarity with the breed. These suggestions ate merely a starting point based upon just a few tidbits of information ... AFAIK, they are not included in the BARQ database so there's little "science" to rely on. I would look to breeder blogs, breed specific rescue groups and owner's clubs for breed specific advice and they've been there, done that". I find rescue groups catering to specific breeds have great insight as they know why they previous owner gave up the dog and what problems adopters have had. Unfortunately there's not a lot out there.... In educating myself about the breed, I found this site quite insightful, especially the right sidebar.

 

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We have a policy on bites that are severe enough to draw blood. In the meantime, I wonder if it is in fact protecting you, or resource guarding with you being the resource. In any case our policy is this.


In the event that you dog has bitten and drawn blood, your first port of call should be a vet visit, including a thyroid check. This is especially true if the aggression is sudden and out of character. After that, you need a qualified, reputable behaviourist who uses updated, positive reinforcement based methods. We may be able to advise methods before the situation escalates to a dog bite but not after; or suggest management strategies in the interim - but as a pre-cursor, not an alternative, to a behaviourist's assessment.

We take this policy because of the seriousness of the matter. If the dog bites another person, you could find yourself civily and/or criminally legally responsible. We simply cannot see the events surrounding the bite. We're not there, we are unable to intervene just before a bite happens, and as such, it would be the height of irresponsibility for members to attempt to advise you on ways to deal with such a serious issue on your own. Any posts advising you on ways to manage the situation yourself will be subject to moderation, including deletion
 
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