Dog Forum banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, so I was wondering at what age could I begin exercising a Great Dane? I understand that Great Dane puppies really aren't suppose to be "exercised," but when does it become okay to do so?? I was assuming around once the dog is 12 to 14 months?

I mean, can Great Danes "really" be exercised at decent levels? Look I by no means need a Greyhound, but the dog needs to have similar energy levels as my own.

As in I would like to go for a 1 hour period of time roughly 3 -4 days a week doing between 45 - 80 minute jogs + 15 minutes of walking with dog. Usually, I'll just end up doing 45 min to an hour of jogging though with a 5 min warmup and at least a 10 min cool down.

Now, I wouldn't just instantly start exercising the dog on my workout routine schedule; I would work up her stamina over a gradual period of time, of course.

Btw, the "main" puppy that I'm considering has dam of who measures 35" at the withers and weighs 130 pounds, and the sire is 38" at 175 pounds, so both dogs are tall, but are on more of the lean and athletic side in ratio to their heights. Also, the (female) puppy is the second largest/tallest of the litter...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Because of their huge frames, Danes really shouldn't be heavily exercised until 16-18 months and some aren't done growing until they're 36 months old. More than moderate exercise before 18 months can cause all sorts of bone and joint issues.

Greyhounds are quite lazy and actually probably need some of the least exercise of any common household breed. As a general idea, the larger the dog, the less heavy exercise it will need. Border Collies and Huskies have some of the most demanding exercise requirements of popular dog breeds while Great Danes, Mastiffs and St. Bernards need smaller amounts of exercise.

If you want a dog that's going to jog with you for an hour 3-4 times a week, I don't think a Great Dane is for you, especially one that could weigh in the 130-150 lb range. When they get tired, they could easily hurt themselves by overexerting to keep up with you. They're typically regarded as a lazier breed and would far rather curl up on the couch than go out for a run.

These are all general statements, and you could end up with a Dane that absolutely loves jogging. But if you're looking for a breed that truly enjoys heavy exercise, you should probably look elsewhere.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, Greyhounds "can" be lazy. That being said, if they were true lazy dogs they wouldn't be able to run as fast and have as high stamina as they do. Plus, other Mastiffs (since Great Danes are Mastiffs, although I usually don't associate them as so) and St.Bernards are "extremely" heavy-set dog breeds. Great Danes aren't. Although they're obviously not as thin and frail in appearance as Greyhounds, they're more times than not, they're on the leaner (but tone) side of dog builds.

I mean, just like Greyhounds "can" be lazy, they're capable of running for hours a day; I especially know this since my current dog is a Greyhound mix herself. I'm looking for a new jogging partner though since my girl is getting elderly and recently developed arthritis, although because of her age I haven't used her a real exercise partner for quite some time now.

I agree with you though... I mean, I'm just on the fence about this a bit. I mean, her parents are very lean built although they're not light weight per-say, and the male is even leaner than the female from a visual standpoint.

I'm tempted to go with a Doberman Pinscher... my 3'rd choice is a Weimaraner... The thing is though Dobermans are in some aspects higher maintenance than Great Danes socially, although I think Doberman Pinschers are actually more fond on the owners and families because of some of these personality traits...
I'm having a much more difficult time though finding a Doberman Pinscher breeder that meets both my standards and price at the time within reasonable driving distance, so that's been a bit of an issue... Also, I'm looking to get a Red and Rust Doberman that's above average height for the breed... preferably a female, so my picks on the pups are more limited..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Well, Greyhounds "can" be lazy. That being said, if they were true lazy dogs they wouldn't be able to run as fast and have as high stamina as they do. Plus, other Mastiffs (since Great Danes are Mastiffs, although I usually don't associate them as so) and St.Bernards are "extremely" heavy-set dog breeds. Great Danes aren't. Although they're obviously not as thin and frail in appearance as Greyhounds, they're more times than not, they're on the leaner (but tone) side of dog builds.

I mean, just like Greyhounds "can" be lazy, they're capable of running for hours a day; I especially know this since my current dog is a Greyhound mix herself. I'm looking for a new jogging partner though since my girl is getting elderly and recently developed arthritis, although because of her age I haven't used her a real exercise partner for quite some time now.

I agree with you though... I mean, I'm just on the fence about this a bit. I mean, her parents are very lean built although they're not light weight per-say, and the male is even leaner than the female from a visual standpoint.

I'm tempted to go with a Doberman Pinscher... my 3'rd choice is a Weimaraner... The thing is though Dobermans are in some aspects higher maintenance than Great Danes socially, although I think Doberman Pinschers are actually more fond on the owners and families because of some of these personality traits...
I'm having a much more difficult time though finding a Doberman Pinscher breeder that meets both my standards and price at the time within reasonable driving distance, so that's been a bit of an issue... Also, I'm looking to get a Red and Rust Doberman that's above average height for the breed... preferably a female, so my picks on the pups are more limited..
Greyhounds don't have stamina, they're sprinters. So perhaps whatever your Greyhound mix is mixed with gave her stamina :)

That aside, I think a Doberman or a Weimeraner are MUCH better options for you, although I can see how your aesthetic needs would make it hard to find one! If you do find a large rust-colored female Doberman, make sure to post pics, because she would be a beautiful dog!

With Dobermans and Weims, you could start exercising them at a much younger age than Danes, plus they live longer (GDs have a life expectancy juts a bit over 7 years, if you didn't know that already). So you could have a GD as a running partner from between about a year and nine months to five or so, which is middle- to old-aged for them, whereas with a Weim or a Doberman, you could jog them from a year old until they're seven or eight. You'd also be facing lots fewer health issues, especially from a reputable breeder, which is where you're looking.

Sounds like you're asking all the right questions and it's really a relief to see someone who is getting a dog that matches their lifestyle. You wouldn't believe how many people log on here and want Border Collies or Huskies when they live in apartments and work 9-5 jobs!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Great Danes not only cannot be OVER excersised for the first 18-24 months, but they must be carefully monitored with even normal amounts. Even Long walks on pavement and other hard surfaces are a no no. NO JOGGING. PERIOD. Play between dogs can cause injuries and often does...so rough play is discouraged. Even after two, GD's are not endurance dogs...they don't go for long periods. Some danes are higher energy and endurance than others of course, as with any breed, but in general these aren't active lifestyle dogs.
Not to mention the other many factors one must consider before owning and raising a dane. The amount of excersise you want from your dog is honestly, the last in importance when it comes to what you need to think of before getting one. I don't know a lot about Dobes, but I will tell you that the vast majority of GD's are the farthest thing from "low maintance" you can get. Even the healthy ones. They are truly a wonderful, magical breed but definitely not for everyone and I hope you will do a lot of research on all aspects of GD's as well as what to look for in a breeder before ever making the choice to bring one home. So many now, are being rehomed because people aren't prepared for the reality of a gd. And as this is the breed of my heart and soul, I have to responsibly tell everyone who is askign about them these things.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
The amount of excersise you want from your dog is honestly, the last in importance when it comes to what you need to think of before getting one.
If you're talking specifically about Great Danes in this sentence then I understand where you're coming from, but in general, I think finding a dog whose exercise requirements fit the activity level of your lifestyle is one of the most important factors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
if you're looking for a dog to run... Don't get a dane. Its not likely going to work well. You also have to be extremely careful with them while they are growing. No runs. None. Even after the heavy impact of running will not be healthy for their joints. I'm sorry but I will be honest, you shouldn't get a dane. Danes ARE mastiffs through and through... Even if you don't see them as mastiffs they are. Living with one would really show you that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
If you're talking specifically about Great Danes in this sentence then I understand where you're coming from, but in general, I think finding a dog whose exercise requirements fit the activity level of your lifestyle is one of the most important factors.
Yes I was talking about the things one must consider before getting a dane. Meaning, there are much more important factors than whether your dane can run with you. Like health issues, temperment, whether you can truly handle a giant dog that literally wants to be attatched to you 24/7. Whether you have small kids (most reputable rescues and breeders won't sell to anyone with kids under 12 generally) Financial costs, etc. Living with a dane can be a dream,or a nightmare, depending on what you end up with. So that's what i meant. Because I agree with you totally, energy level is a HUGE deal when deciding a breed for your lifestyle. Nothing worse than a hyper/active dog for a lazy person, or vice versa.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Yes I was talking about the things one must consider before getting a dane. Meaning, there are much more important factors than whether your dane can run with you. Like health issues, temperment, whether you can truly handle a giant dog that literally wants to be attatched to you 24/7. Whether you have small kids (most reputable rescues and breeders won't sell to anyone with kids under 12 generally) Financial costs, etc. Living with a dane can be a dream,or a nightmare, depending on what you end up with. So that's what i meant. Because I agree with you totally, energy level is a HUGE deal when deciding a breed for your lifestyle. Nothing worse than a hyper/active dog for a lazy person, or vice versa.
Totally. I was really wanting a harlequin the last time I was looking for a dog but I decided that I needed to do WAY more research before getting myself into the breed, and also have a separate bank account solely to pay for any vet bills that may crop up. As a graduate student, I didn't have the extra funds to pay for large vet bills, so I decided to hold off. I'm not a super active person, but I do want to live in a home with lots of space, so I think I would lead a good life to share with a Dane... Eventually :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Well, I read a few people here saying how I should do my research first and so on so forth, but no worries really I've done "all of my research" (then again, one can always do "more" research, since there's always new things to learn) prior to buying a Great Dane. As in for example, I even know the "exact" diet I would be putting the dog on from each few months of puppy-hood all the way up to the last few years of life. Anways, I'm fairly educated when it comes to dogs and dog breeds in general period (not to toot my own horn lol)

Also as an individual, I think that exercise and endurance qualifications are in my top 5 reasons for picking out a specific dog breed/dog. I would never put exercise as my last by any means what so ever. Like if I were someone who didn't lead an active lifestyle, I wouldn't care so much (as long as the dog not require high levels of exercise), but I'm very big into my health, so it would be nice to have a good jogging partner again.

Really though, I'm actually moving not "too" long from now hopefully to a different city, and I'm looking to own a dog that either looks somewhat intimidating/on the larger side, since I'm not very intimidating myself, being that I'm a young, small female.
Plus, I kind of get worried now to go out jogging by myself since I had a person who was starting to stalk me, and then I'v had a few men try to pick me up... so now I'm all paranoid to do any outside exercise activities without protective dog.

But yeah, I'm highly considering a Doberman too right now, and btw to be honest I'm not really looking to adopt a dog (although I have checked just incase), since I'm looking for a high quality bred purebreed dog that is strictly within a certain age due to how specific weeks and months of puppyhood highly effect a dog's overall personality and trainabilty long term.

Only problem with buying a Doberman though is that pretty much all the apartments and rentals that I've looked at that actually accept dogs DO NOT allow Dobermans! ... It's been very frustrating too... but I'm sure that someone would make an exception once they realized that the dog is (will be then at least) well trained...

That being said, I know that I would feel safe and well protected by a loyal Dobie... Plus I LOVE dobermans! :) They're "super" easy to train, and if properly brought up are extremely loyal and loving towards their owners/families.

Maybe I will go with owning a Doberman Pinscher? Still on the fence about it, but not gonna lie, while at the Pet Store buying my dog some new care suppliesearlier today, I saw this wonderful red and rust Doberman, that really has made me want a Doberman more a little more now...

Lol This puppy-picking out can be so difficult!
and Thanks for all the advice and input everyone, :) I really am taking what you guys say into consideration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You could try Doberman rescue.:)
There are tons of dobes out there up for adoption, many under a year old!

If you can overlook the color Atlanta Doberman Rescue has a nice female pup!
Dobermans for Adoption

You can also check other rescues, shelters, and even petfinder.com!
Thanks for the link! I know that just before in my last post, I was going on about how I wouldn't really consider on adopting a Dobie, (and although the pup is a 'bit' too old for my liking when it comes to first owning puppies) I really do love that 12 - 14 week old Doberman pup in the link! Depending on the specifics of the puppy though (like when it was seperated from it's mom, which can't be any earlier than 7 weeks for me to adopt it) I would seriously look into adopting a Dobie like that!

Thanks again, I think I will look even more on Doberman Puppy adoption now that I've seen some higher quality Dobermans like this. I might not find the right puppy in GA, but I'll look into TN, SC, NC, and other bordering states too. :) and btw, love your user icon pic! That's the type of Doberman I'm looking to own. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yes I was talking about the things one must consider before getting a dane. Meaning, there are much more important factors than whether your dane can run with you. Like health issues, temperment, whether you can truly handle a giant dog that literally wants to be attatched to you 24/7. Whether you have small kids (most reputable rescues and breeders won't sell to anyone with kids under 12 generally) Financial costs, etc. Living with a dane can be a dream,or a nightmare, depending on what you end up with. So that's what i meant. Because I agree with you totally, energy level is a HUGE deal when deciding a breed for your lifestyle. Nothing worse than a hyper/active dog for a lazy person, or vice versa.

Lol well, I don't think I need to worry about factors like children, plus I'm not 12 (obviously lolz :) ) and am a young adult I don't think that's going to apply to me. X)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
274 Posts
Only problem with buying a Doberman though is that pretty much all the apartments and rentals that I've looked at that actually accept dogs DO NOT allow Dobermans! ... It's been very frustrating too... but I'm sure that someone would make an exception once they realized that the dog is (will be then at least) well trained...
Actually, I hate to be the one to ruin that idea, but they WON'T make exceptions. If I knew you were going to be living in an apartment, I would have immediately told you that no apartment I have ever lived in has allowed Dobermans, Rottweilers, Staffys, Pits, Chows or Akitas. Many are not allowing German Shepherd Dogs any more.

While it's stupid, it's actually in the leasing contract they make you sign and they are not going to change the contract, no matter how well-trained or well-behaved your dog is. It's an insurance issue and a liability issue in their eyes. Most people who run apartment buildings are not educated about dogs and will look at your Doberman, see a large scary dog, and tell you that you can't have it. :(

ETA: If they let you have your well-trained Doberman, the next person who comes along with a Staffy or Rottweiler is going to say "but I saw someone walking a Doberman around here, why can't I have my dog?". Making one exception opens the floodgates for all sorts of irresponsible dogs and owners.

Dobermans are just not apartment dogs.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,876 Posts
Thanks again, I think I will look even more on Doberman Puppy adoption now that I've seen some higher quality Dobermans like this. I might not find the right puppy in GA, but I'll look into TN, SC, NC, and other bordering states too. :) and btw, love your user icon pic! That's the type of Doberman I'm looking to own. :)
Thanks! He is my newest addition! I was looking for the opposite of what you want! I wanted a calm dog so I needed to go with an adult. Stable temperament and being good with small dogs were also musts for me. He actually came from the SPCA! A friend involved in Dobe rescue told me about him. She is constantly pulling and transporting dogs. There really are many, many dobes in need of homes!

If you are renting you really are going to have a difficult time finding a place that will allow this breed...
Definitely something you need to think long and hard about!
Even if you find an apartment now that allows you to have a Dobe, what will happen if you need to move to a new location and start apartment hunting all over again?
Unfortunately, you are going to be limited by most likely breed and weight.
When I was renting, we were only allowed a total of 2 pets. Could be cats or dogs under 25 lbs. There was also a huge list of breeds that were not allowed. All would have been over the 25lbs limit but it was still in our contract.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
614 Posts
I got my dane as a senior and only had half my research done. I quickly learned that he was not an active dog. Yes, he likes to play sometimes but he's no 5k walker. He actually fits in well with me because I'm not a super active person either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
As in for example, I even know the "exact" diet I would be putting the dog on from each few months of puppy-hood all the way up to the last few years of life.

Also as an individual, I think that exercise and endurance qualifications are in my top 5 reasons for picking out a specific dog breed/dog. I would never put exercise as my last by any means what so ever. Like if I were someone who didn't lead an active lifestyle, I wouldn't care so much (as long as the dog not require high levels of exercise), but I'm very big into my health, so it would be nice to have a good jogging partner again.
Can you explain what you mean by that? Because if you're talking about feeding puppy food I'm assuming you don't already know that a great dane pup should be on a high quality ADULT, all life stages food for the entirety of it's life? Preferably grain free or raw? That there are only one or two puppy foods on the entire dog food market suitable for a growing dane pup and one of them *INNOVA large breed puppy* is now a no no due to the recent issues with P&G? Just pointing this out (more so) for those who are reading who don't know about Great Dane nutrition.

I already explained in a second post what I meant by my comment in regards to "excersise being last" in consideration of a dane. Excersise/energy level is extremely important in choosing any dog yes, but there are more detrimental aspects to adding a GD to your lifestyle than whether they can jog or not..that's all I was getting at.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,678 Posts
You could try Doberman rescue.:)
There are tons of dobes out there up for adoption, many under a year old!

If you can overlook the color Atlanta Doberman Rescue has a nice female pup!
Dobermans for Adoption

You can also check other rescues, shelters, and even petfinder.com!
This is an interesting thread! I am going to follow this one.:) I read the Adoption Policies on the link you posted kmes and I must admit to me some of them were just...:eek::eek::eek::eyeroll:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,598 Posts
finding an apartment that will let you have a dane is going to be as hard of a battle. I looked for a YEAR to be able to have my danes in a apartment. Its not easy because of their size. Also if you want a jogging partner don't consider getting a dane. Chances are you won't have an active enough dog, or if you do, that the long jobs are going to be way too much damage on its joints in the long run.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top