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Discussion Starter #1
So I saw someone on my FB was feeding their puppy raisins. I told them to be careful because raisins can cause kidney failure if a dog eats too many, and I sent them a link. They went to the vet today and said their vet feeds his dogs grapes and told them that people need to not believe everything they read on the internet. The FB person then posted on FB, "Thank you to everyone who made me paranoid."

I wasn't trying to make anyone paranoid. I just know that they love their puppy so I wanted to let them know so she'd stop feeding it raisins.

So my question is, are they actually toxic? Every website I click on says to not feed them to your dog.

But this vet is saying it's fine?

I was originally just going to scroll on by but I couldn't get myself to do it. I wish I had still, because now I think they're making me look like an idiot on FB and their many friends are going to read the post and think raisins and grapes are ok.

Or maybe im just being paranoid.
 

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If her puppy gets sick and or dies resist the urge to say, "I told you so!"

Grapes are not too bad, but have been known to cause problems, so I personally do not risk it. Raisins on the other had are known to be deadly. We had a poster on DF around a year or so ago who's puppy died from eating raisins. She did not realize, until it was too late, that her grandchild had been dropping raisins and the pup was eating them. She thought it was only a few, and rushed the pup to the vet, come to find out it was more then a few and the pup passed away.
 
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My understanding is that some dogs can tolerate grapes, but some can not tolerate even one, which can cause sudden and complete kidney failure. Not something I would take a chance with.
 

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@Rain, thank you. I knew this group could help me feel better. I have been second-guessing myself and feeling like an idiot TBH. But I suppose I should get used to this kind of thing if im going to work with dogs as a side-job in the future. :ponder:

Im wondering what was actually said between the owner and the vet. I wouldn't think a vet would say it's okay to give a puppy raisins.
 

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@Rain, thank you. I knew this group could help me feel better. I have been second-guessing myself and feeling like an idiot TBH. But I suppose I should get used to this kind of thing if im going to work with dogs as a side-job in the future. :ponder:

Im wondering what was actually said between the owner and the vet. I wouldn't think a vet would say it's okay to give a puppy raisins.
The raisin thing is crazy, I agree with you and cannot believe a vet would say that. Here's an older story on just how toxic raisins are Raisins, grapes, even in small amounts, can kill a dog | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

I'm wondering if the vet said grapes are O.K but raisins are toxic, like some vets will gay garlic is O.K. but say onions are toxic. If the vet said raisins are O.K. the woman should run to another vet.
 

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Old homestead remedy for worm was to feed garlic and/or plug tobacco to any animal. Most people don't know that grapes, raisins and, muscadines can be toxic to dogs. My vet says a large dog probably won't be bothered by eating one or two grapes, raisins or, muscadines but, you don't want them snacking on them as treats. Smaller dogs shouldn't have them at all. He says about 50% of dogs react severely to them and about 25% can eat tons of them just fine.

Ask your vet, opinions vary but, if he says across the board, it's fine, find a new vet.

Personally I'm not taking chances. My pack, except the puppy, knows not to eat grapes and muscadines and, are never given access to raisins but, if one did eat a couple, he'd be seeing the vet for a dose of peroxide, just to be safe. (or, I'd dose him myself if we were out camping and it was too far to the vet.)
 

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grape toxicity is a real phenomenon and ingestion should be taken seriously. Raisins the same, only they are more concentrated in their potential toxicity. However, saying that, dogs that are actually sensitive to whatever toxin is in grapes and raisins are in the minority. So far there is little understanding as to how exactly grapes/raisins damage the canine kidney, but it is obvious that it does not happen in a lot of dogs.

I have treated a lot of dogs for grape/raisin ingestion- in other words, have made them vomit and then hospitalized for 24-48 hours on fluids... but so far, 100% success rate... or else these dogs were resistant to the toxins. Who knows. Waiting for symptoms to occur is NOT a good idea, though, because by that time, the damage has been done and kidneys do not have any ability to repair themselves... once in renal failure, always in renal failure (with a few exceptions).

But my own personal dogs have eaten literally thousands of grapes and raisins growing in my own yard (years prior to my learning of the toxicity). Never seen an untoward symptom, other than when my Golden Retriever at the entire grape vine (leaves, grapes, stem and all), and was sick to his stomach for a few days (likely the poorly chewed up stem rather than the grapes were to blame). I had about 10 dogs at the time was growing two huge vines that crawled all over the back yard, and grapes/raisins fell to ground all the time. Most of the dogs had no interest in them, but a few ate all they could find. Still nothing.

That does not make me have the attitude that they are harmless for dogs, though, as I have read enough reports in the journals saying otherwise. No way on earth really to know which dogs are sensitive and which are not, without having a tragic experience I am afraid... so at work we treat all ingestions as potentially serious, just in case.
 
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