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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Well some of you guys may have read my other thread about my puppy being very mouth-ish lately. I read some articles on bite inhibition, tried stuff out and he's STILL biting and now that he's a bit older his bites are starting to hurt a bit more. He left alot of my left arm filled with bite marks and cuts today. I was working with him. Praising him everytime he would let me touch him and then of all sudden BAM he goes into this weird crazy pshyco mode and just starts biting me. This happened a few times today. I'm starting to get a bit frustrated with him...I'm kind of regretting taking in such a young puppy without knowing anything about him (A friend was looking for a home for the little guy; Our family was talking to a few breeders at that time) :/
Advice? Thanks...
 

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I was working with him. Praising him everytime he would let me touch him and then of all sudden BAM he goes into this weird crazy pshyco mode and just starts biting me. This happened a few times today.
Can you elaborate on this? Was this play behavior? Puppy Zoomies? Something else?

Really though it takes time and consistency. Stick with it! They do learn!
Have you watched this video yet?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply.
To answer your question, he'll growl, show me his teeth, sometimes bark, and bite. But really it happens in one quick instant. One second he's fine and then he gets all weird on me.

Yes I have seen that video, and that was the method I was using. He started off doing well but then everything went downhill. :/
 

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The best way to teach a dog not to bite is to ignore him (as long as he doesn't have a piece of you or your clothing). Remember even negative attention, is attention, which is a reward. I find that way too many of my clients are inadvertently rewarding puppy biting by giving it attention. Also you want to make sure you're providing enough exercise. I highly recommend doggie daycare where other dogs will help teach bite inhibition and he'll come home pooped. A tired dog is a good dog - always.
 

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@ albelee I'm not really sure...People here have been saying Jack Russel/ Daschund.

@Crio I've been working with him for a little over a week. 2-3 sessions a day.

@FernDog The first times he was biting I tried ignoring him with no success. He'll still be hanging on to my shoes or skin.
 

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Teaching a dog to inhibit biting and stop on command is very important, but it can take some time, specially if a puppy didn't learn bite inhibition with his mom and litter mates, and/or is too energetic and rough.

- how old is your pup? They tend to bite softer and get calmer when they grow up, but it can take up to even 2 years old.
- exercise him. A pup that lacks of exercise and is bored doesn't listen at all (not to mention that pups don't have good attention focus yet).
- teach him to bite his toys/chew bones instead, and that playing with humans should be through toys, and that any other interactions with humans should be gentle, by doing the following:
- redirect him to chew stuffs and toys every time he tries to initiate play - try to grad his attention by waving the chew stuffs in front of him, get his prey drive focused on the toys, and then give him the stuffs, coz he might not feel interested if you just stuck a toy in his mouth and he will still find biting you more fun.
- reward his calm state, with lots of gentle caressing and gentle tone of voice, without getting him excited. Make him realize that you like that, and that it's comfy for him too. You can also try asking him for kisses instead, but make sure he is calm and won't be rough on you before trying that (and don't let kids do it, specially when you're not sure when he can be rough)!
- get him a play mate - dogs usually teach each other the limits, as long as their energy level is similar (for example, it's better not to put a high energy dog with a low energy dog together, since the high energy one might be too annoying while the low energy one might be too submissive or get aggressive as he might not like rough interaction).
- teach him a command to stop, or ask him to do something like "sit" or "wait" (and then redirect him to chew stuffs or play with you with toys).
- if he doesn't respect the commands or doesn't get redirected, then time-out can be good. It can be done in 2 ways: one is you going away from him (go to a room with him, put a baby gate at the entrance, and when he gets too rough and doesn't listen to your command, go away from the room and leave him behind baby gate for some time, then come back as if nothing happened and repeat - this is like litter mates or mom stop playing coz he played too rough, the difference is that in this scenario, you can really run away from him and not having him hanging on your clothes); or by putting him in a boring room 'till he calms down (this is better for when he really doesn't respect your boundaries, as in when you tell him to stop and he doesn't, not just coz he's biting too rough).


Just make sure that you don't just give him attention when he's doing undesirable stuffs, or else, just like others have said, any attention will do for him and he will do it even more just to get your attention. Make sure you play a lot with him, take a lot of initiative too! Play with him with toys, so that he will learn that fun is you+toys. Act as if the toy is really interesting for you too, and ask him to sit/wait sometimes too. For example, I play tug with my pup and I tease him with the toy (he has good prey drive), and ignore a bite or two from him while waving the toy. :)

It's better not to play with him in a way that drives him to use his teeth to play - my bf sometimes hugs and grabs and rolls with our pup, and most of the times that we do that, even if not for playing, he would start bite mode (we're trying to amend that).

Our pup was a really annoying biter, leaving me with bruises and red wounds, and he wouldn't stop. But it seems that it's improving while he's growing, so when he's not so excited, his bites doesn't hurt much or at all. Now my hands doesn't have bruises or wounds at all. :D

Just remember that it can take some time, from weeks to months, but keep consistent and patient, since pups are pups, and energetic pups are energetic pups after all.


(and by the way, avoid yelping, it usually makes pups more excited)
 

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Ok, I didn't see the clip but this is what I did with my biter. And I took a few bites along the way.

Every time he would bite I gave a big OUCH and put him in his crate. I played with him near the crate to practice this. After putting him in the crate I left the room. His bite started being less painful. When that happen after every bite I would then give him a toy.

Giving the ouch showed him that biting down hurt me. Now his so well behave and if he wants a belly rub he grabs my hand in his mouth and places my hand on his belly. :D

With my girl she was the little stinker and nothing was working. So every time she bite I would lay her on her side so she could calm down. Some people disagree on this because they say the dog will be scared of you. Trust me, she thinks I'm her pet :p But now even when she's hyper and reaching for my hand she won't bite.
 

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Turn your back, fold your arms so he can't reach them and ignore him while he's behaving like that EVERY time he bites too hard.

Bit by bit, reduce how hard you're prepared to let him bite you and eventually you should be turning your back for just teeth on your skin.

If you don't do it this way, he won't learn a soft mouth on humans which is why (sorry) I don't think the kikopup method is a safe one.


The puppy should NOT be stopped from biting humans before he learns how to decrease the force of his bites.
 

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I should add - the kikopup method will stop your puppy from biting and it will focus the dog on appropriate behaviour and for that it's wonderful - kind and straightforward. What it won't do is allow the dog to inhibit its bite in an emergency situation (such as getting a tail trapped in a car door.)
 

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When he goes into crazy mode, have you determined if he is playing, not resource guarding?

As far as working with him, it's not a matter of doing it in "sessions". Better to approach this as a management issue all day long. It's a mistake to create the situation where he is bitey, then try to teach him not to bite. You will not make any progress that way at all.

1) make sure you are not stimulating him or getting him excited. Getting a puppy all hyped up equals a biting puppy.
2) always have a soft toy to put in his mouth when he get excited.
3) make sure he gets plenty of exercise and toy focused play time to discharge that puppy energy.
4) never, ever use your hands or arms as play things.. That means no wrestling with him.
5) when he gets in the crazy mode, calmly have a time out. You can turn and leave, or lure him to his crate, etc. it's crucial you get very calm when he goes crazy. If you get at all animated or frustrated, the puppy will get worse.

Hope some of that helps.
 

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As far as working with him, it's not a matter of doing it in "sessions". Better to approach this as a management issue all day long. It's a mistake to create the situation where he is bitey, then try to teach him not to bite. You will not make any progress that way at all..
Oh dear, yes. This has to be EVERY time he gets excited and starts biting/mouthing and it's really not fair to try to set him up to do it.
 

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Yeah if you remain calm and interact calmly, your pup will eventually interact calmly too. :) I guess that unless an adult dog has perfect bite inhibition, they do still bite hard if they get too excited, even if they don't do it much anymore.

Another thing I do is that I let my pup mouth my hands when he's calm and it doesn't hurt at all. Mouthing is a natural thing that dogs do to each other anyways.

The only times he can get very excited are when we are playing together with some object, and never only with my hands. If we are to run excited, I will let him know that I don't want his bites, just running around (he tends to get bitey if he follows me running, which is something I'm trying to work out).
 
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