Dog Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 1 of 1 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,840 Posts
You could, but like others said, it could make life difficult and expensive.

I got a pup during summer right after my last year of undergrad, before I started grad school. But I still live at home and my parents were happy to help out. They also wanted me to have this dog so I wouldn't be hiking alone. So there was always somebody home I could trust to watch him.

Another perk to living at home is reduced cost of living. They don't charge me rent and I don't use any more electricity than they do on their own (I'm a bit of a minimalist and very energy conscious). So my part time jobs allow me to pretty much take care of the rest of my personal expenses, including pet care, and that's a lot because I have a LOT of animals (3 cats, 3 dogs and a handful of reptiles).

That's on top of paying for gas/car maintenance, research expenses for my thesis, food, any recreational activities etc. It does add up. And you never know when an unexpected expense will come up. Shortly after I got my puppy, he started cocking his head. He had fox tails stuck in one and it was $200 to remove them. Or when I took my car in for an oil change and they had to go and tell me I needed new brakes and a fuel filter too. I'm lucky I get grants that pay for my tuition, and this year I've actually made a profit being a student because I received a $3800 grant. I'm applying for more. Side note: Grants are your friend. Apply for ALL the grants!.

I don't think I would have gotten a dog if I was not in the situation I was in with supportive parents. Remember that if your not living at home, a dog can really add to your expenses even more, beyond just basic care and vet.

A lot of land lords require a pet deposit, and an increased rent fee each month to keep a dog. You might have a hard time finding a place to rent period with a dog. I went with my boyfriend to Utah while he took a summer course at Southern Utah University and I took my dog. It was a bugger trying to find a place to stay. College towns are not always the most dog friendly places. Real estate doesn't like dogs and students living together...It suggests disaster and lost profits.

If you decide to have roommates to reduce housing expenses, remember that they will be around your dog. They may not treat your dog the way you like him treated. They may be irresponsible and leave the door open so your dog escapes. They may not be on board with helping care for your dog when you aren't there, so you might not be able to count on somebody else letting him out to potty or playing with him. If the dog causes problems in the house and chews on stuff or pees in the house, it can create major roommate drama.
 
1 - 1 of 1 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top