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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For the last month I've been working at a kennel where I'm exposed to many different dog breeds. I find myself going in love with giant breeds such as the Mastiff, Cane Corso, and Great Pyrenees.

How did you choose the dog breed you currently own, and what kind of dog would you love to have in the future?

Those that have giant breeds, what are their personalities like? Were they difficult to train?

I rescued a mix and we got our beagle as a puppy just by chance on Craigslist. We didn't seek out a beagle or research other breeds, we just wanted a puppy and that was the first thing we found. I have many years ahead with my dogs but it's fun to imagine what other dogs we'd like to have :)
 

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You are probably already happy about having a Beagle in your home. They are wonderful companions, helping make life more enjoyable. I got my first Beagle in 2001 and he turned out to be the perfect dog for me. It's always good to read about other Beagle owners (guardians).
 

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I have a giant breed. Gentlest soul with us, never even nipped as a puppy, doesn't play rough just want's to cuddle, doesn't destroy furniture, yet will rip the throat out of any intruders.

Being highly independent and reliant on more on instinctual behaviors makes them simultaneously difficult to train but at the same time in need of less training.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You are probably already happy about having a Beagle in your home. They are wonderful companions, helping make life more enjoyable. I got my first Beagle in 2001 and he turned out to be the perfect dog for me. It's always good to read about other Beagle owners (guardians).
Yes! My beagle is so affectionate. His personality is perfect, he loves to swim and hike and I love going on like adventures with him. He also plays hide n seek with his toys and it's the cutest thing I've ever seen. I absolutely love how he has to be right up against me in bed when we sleep! He really makes me remember to appreciate the little things in life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have a giant breed. Gentlest soul with us, never even nipped as a puppy, doesn't play rough just want's to cuddle, doesn't destroy furniture, yet will rip the throat out of any intruders.

Being highly independent and reliant on more on instinctual behaviors makes them simultaneously difficult to train but at the same time in need of less training.
Which giant breed? I'd imagine teaching them to walk nicely on a leash is most important..the giant breeds at work could drag me all over if they wanted to lol
 

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Which giant breed? I'd imagine teaching them to walk nicely on a leash is most important..the giant breeds at work could drag me all over if they wanted to lol
every dog should learn how to walk on the leash.
it's not more or less important with a big dog than with a small dog.
I owned only medium breeds (Boxer and dogo canario mix) until now and most dogs I know also aren't giant breeds (shelter dogs...Rottweiler(mixes), Schäfi(mixes), SoKa(mixes), lab(mixes), Akita, several hounds, Dackel...), but if they really wanted they could easily pull me off my feet. :)
I suppose the only difference in training between big and small breeds is, that with very small breeds you've got to be much more careful because they can get hurt much easier and there are a lot of predators like cats, crows, seagulls or hawks that can easily kill such a dog.
 

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I fostered two Mastiffs who had no formal training at all. They ate the wall, next to the door where they went out to do thier business. But. I taught them to walk on leashes and it only took one day to do it. I was surprised how smart they were, and how easily trained. They learned to not beg, to leave the room when I said "out", to not be too rough, to walk politely on the leashes, to sit, to down and that was all in one week. I mean they were consistant in being obedient to those commands. I was impressed with them. Then I had to give them back. Bummer.
 

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I did the same thing! My mother passed away and I got a kelpie puppy. I had no clue what kind of puppy i wanted at the time. He's EXTREMELY high energy, super muscular from all the exercise, about 40lbs of solid muscle.

My white gsd puppy is very different. Other dogs come up to play and at 3 months old he just lays there like he doesn't really care. He's aloof and calm the way you see large older dogs behave.
He's younge, hyper, and very vocal. It's like having a conversation. If I tell him not to do something he will stop doing it but bark at me as if to say "but I WANT to!"
He howls at me when he's hyper and bored too, so he goes out for walks/dog park about three times a day. That part is difficult because I get home from work and can't relax until I get his energy out somehow.
Since he's going to be so big, I'm very strict with leash walking and socializing. I also don't let him on couches or jump on people. My 40lb kelpie is allowed on furniture and even that gets bothersome especially with company. Let alone a 2nd dog eventually weighing 80lbs.
 
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