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Do you feed your dog garlic?

  • Yes

    Votes: 3 20.0%
  • No

    Votes: 9 60.0%
  • Undecided/Still Deciding

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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do you give your dog garlic?
If there was a specific study or article that swayed you one way or another, please share.

I only recently learned that garlic is supposedly toxic to dogs. I also know that there are many people who say feeding your dog garlic in small amounts is good. I even had people recommending giving my dog garlic when I was looking for a natural flea and tick preventative. Then as I started reading labels more closely on treats and food, I discovered that garlic is in some dog treats and food. Even some that I had fed my dog.

I've been reading some research on what the hazards/benefits are, so that I can make an informed decision. At this point I am of the opinion that I will not give my dog garlic until I know more. If I am swayed by the benefits, I will not give my dog anything premade with garlic because I would want to know exactly how much I was giving him.

I would love to know other people's opinions but even more I would love to know the reasons behind your opinion.
 

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I voted: Yes

While I do not directly feed my dog garlic, I do share table scraps occasionally - in the form of potatoes, which -in our family- generally contain a quantity of garlic, so indirectly, yes Toby ingests garlic with no ill affects.

That said, I would not advise others feed garlic to their dogs (in the form of cloves, raw or cooked) because there IS a risk to doing so and I would not want to be responsible for guiding someone in that direction and having something terrible happen to their dog.

I do feel (and have found) that small quantities of indirect garlic have very little negative affect on my dog.
 

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I don't purposely feed him garlic, but if he consumes a little from my sharing part of a meal with him I don't worry about it. What I don't let him have, at all, is onions. If what I'm eating has onions in it I won't share it with him.
 

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I think if you can mitigate any tick and flea problems with the use of an appropriate amount of garlic than you should, rather than putting the liquid poison on your dog. I know enough other people who are having success with the use of garlic as a preventative and I may soon become one myself. Currently, I stretch out the application of the Frontline to more than every 30 days probably closer to 45-50 days during the active months. I am a fan of Dr. Becker and truly believe she has your dog's best interests at heart.

https://www.facebook.com/doctor.karen.becker/posts/114109371942083
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
I think if you can mitigate any tick and flea problems with the use of an appropriate amount of garlic than you should, rather than putting the liquid poison on your dog. I know enough other people who are having success with the use of garlic as a preventative and I may soon become one myself. Currently, I stretch out the application of the Frontline to more than every 30 days probably closer to 45-50 days during the active months. I am a fan of Dr. Becker and truly believe she has your dog's best interests at heart.

https://www.facebook.com/doctor.karen.becker/posts/114109371942083
My dog had a severe allergic reaction to Frontline Plus, which made me leary of giving any other chemical topical so and led to my research on alternative remedies. I found the below link that recommends Rose Geranium essential oil for ticks. There is also a link on that page to other bug repellents with essential oils. After reading that site and others, I now put a mix of Rose geranium, peppermint and lavender on his collar daily which seems to work. If I know I'm going to a higher risk area than normal, I also use Vets Best spray on.

Easy, Natural Tick Repellent That Really Works - Primally Inspired
 

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Garlic is considered potentially harmful to dogs. It's on the chart on my vet's wall, along with a list of other bad foods and household items, and toxic plants. Here's photos of the charts, sorry they are a bit blurry as I took them with my cell in low lighting.

Photo 1
Photo 2
 

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Garlic is considered potentially harmful to dogs. It's on the chart on my vet's wall, along with a list of other bad foods and household items, and toxic plants. Here's photos of the charts, sorry they are a bit blurry as I took them with my cell in low lighting.

Photo 1
Photo 2
Yes and I bet your vet says feeding raw is bad as well.
 

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I absolutely do not feed garlic. Arsenic won't kill you in small enough doses either but I'm not going to take that risk. Somehow, 'It's only a LITTLE toxic!' doesn't appease my anxiety when it comes to my dog, who already has anemia problems and garlic can make it worse.
 

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Cut with the arrogant attitude please

My vet sells raw in their clinic in the freezer/refrigerated section of their cat and dog food options.
With garlic in it?

Nothing "arrogant" about my comment just that a poster showing garlic as an absolute toxic food item is misleading. People look at a poster like the one in your vet's office and walk believing garlic in any amount is dangerous to a dog. Maybe you posted the pics of the posters at your vet's office for some reason other than the obvious.

I'm willing to bet you that many people are feeding their dogs garlic in one form or another and do not even know it. I looked at various dog treats a while ago and noticed it is a fairly common ingredient in many of them as well as many commercially prepared dog kibble. Garlic in Dog Food -- Good or Bad for Your Pet?

Also, if the vet you use sells real raw food, your vet is doing so in defiance of the AVMA guidelines which I find interesting. Perhaps the food being sold at your vet's office is the type which is "cooked" enough to kill any pathogens.
https://www.avma.org/KB/Policies/Pa...imal-Source-Protein-in-Cat-and-Dog-Diets.aspx

I'd appreciate it if you wouldn't resort to name calling as this is a "friendly" forum, so no need for comments like "arrogant attitude". Thank you.
 

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Just a reminder to please remember the rules. One of them is to at least be civil and if you can't be civil, don't post.

Anyway, arsenic also doesn't have any medicinal benefits that I know of lol. Garlic does. Most medicines that we take are toxic, which is why they work.
 

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With garlic in it?

Nothing "arrogant" about my comment just that a poster showing garlic as an absolute toxic food item is misleading. People look at a poster like the one in your vet's office and walk believing garlic in any amount is dangerous to a dog. Maybe you posted the pics of the posters at your vet's office for some reason other than the obvious.

I'm willing to bet you that many people are feeding their dogs garlic in one form or another and do not even know it. I looked at various dog treats a while ago and noticed it is a fairly common ingredient in many of them as well as many commercially prepared dog kibble. Garlic in Dog Food -- Good or Bad for Your Pet?

Also, if the vet you use sells real raw food, your vet is doing so in defiance of the AVMA guidelines which I find interesting. Perhaps the food being sold at your vet's office is the type which is "cooked" enough to kill any pathogens.
https://www.avma.org/KB/Policies/Pa...imal-Source-Protein-in-Cat-and-Dog-Diets.aspx

I'd appreciate it if you wouldn't resort to name calling as this is a "friendly" forum, so no need for comments like "arrogant attitude". Thank you.
There is nothing friendly on this topic from you. Please take your own advice.

My vet is Canadian, AVMA has no jurisdiction over Canadian veterinarians thank god. The food my vet sells is 100% raw. Mountain Dog Food and Big Country Raw are two of the brands I can recall.

No garlic in my dog food.

INGREDIENTS
Chicken meal, steel-cut oats, deboned chicken, whole potato, peas, chicken fat, whole egg, deboned flounder, sun-cured alfalfa, chicken liver, herring oil, pea fiber, whole apples, whole pears, sweet potato, pumpkin, butternut squash, parsnips, carrots, spinach, cranberries, blueberries, kelp, chicory root, juniper berries, angelica root, marigold flowers, sweet fennel, peppermint leaf, lavender.

SUPPLEMENTS
Vitamin A supplement, vitamin D3 supplement, vitamin E supplement, niacin, riboflavin, folic acid, biotin, vitamin B12 supplement, zinc proteinate, iron proteinate, manganese proteinate, copper proteinate, selenium yeast, dried Enterococcus faecium fermentation product.


Repeating your opinion in order to try and persuade others to your point of view and ignoring any evidence that is counter to your point of view is called bludgeoning the process, and is sadly very rampant on these types of boards. While you might have some very valid points, they are getting lost to your dominant behavior and others are less likely to consider your viewpoints because of it. State your piece and move on. Stop telling others what they think is wrong - Especially when their information is coming from a veterinary office and not google. :eyeroll:

I'm out though, as I imagine that, as someone who bludgeons the process, you will need to have the last word here as well. Ciao!
 

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My reasons aren't very scientific, I just had a dog come in for boarding once who's owner requested we feed her 1 tsp of garlic daily in her food. She wouldn't touch her food and when she did, she'd throw it all up soon afterward. That garlic smelling puke and breath is enough to turn me off of the idea. I'm also not going to use something that *might* work with how often Jayne goes up north in the woods.
 

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Not all medicines that work on humans work on dogs. Things we can eat will make them sick. Chocolate and grapes both have benefits to humans! ...That doesn't work on dogs. Just because we use it as some sort of justification for why it's okay for our pets is comparing apples to porcupines, and while others might be willing to take that risk, I'm not. :(

(Arsenic did/does have medical uses incidentally, it's googleable. Mostly seem to revolve around syphilis, cancer and tumors; research is ongoing.)
 

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Not all medicines that work on humans work on dogs. Things we can eat will make them sick. Chocolate and grapes both have benefits to humans! ...That doesn't work on dogs. Just because we use it as some sort of justification for why it's okay for our pets is comparing apples to porcupines, and while others might be willing to take that risk, I'm not.


(Arsenic did/does have medical uses incidentally, it's googleable. Mostly seem to revolve around syphilis, cancer and tumors; research is ongoing.)
Chocolate and grapes is not really a medicine for anything really. It is also true (of course) that we have different natural diets. Chemo is poisonous to everything.. But it's a medicine.
If chocolate had a positive property for a certain condition to a dog... You might give it to them. They would actually be fine. But it does not so why bother? It is only very bad for them under all circumstance.

We are however discussing garlic now, and a lot of the medicinal application for dogs for example is because of ticks. The fact that ticks will not go for dogs or humans I think does have carry over.

I just don't follow your logic.
 

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There is nothing friendly on this topic from you. Please take your own advice..............................................
My posts in this thread are just fine, please reread them if you choose.

It would be more productive if you spent your energy trying to add something germane to the topic of this thread rather than being so combative. If you would have read my previous posts you would have discovered I am on the fence regarding the use of garlic as a tick and flea preventative rather than the fipronil I topically apply to my dog during the season. With that in mind, it would seem highly unlikely that I am trying to " bludgeon the process" since I do NOT currently use garlic, please try and grasp this fact as you make your accusations regarding my conduct.

I might challenge you with this; if the posters in your vet office display garlic as, if you noticed " potentially harmful foods " then why in the world do so many dog food/treat producers use garlic in their products? Obviously, they must not have seen the posters in your vet's office? Better yet, why not ask your vet about small amounts of garlic in a dog's diet as I have done. I have queried 4 different vets about garlic and it uses and have received the same replies in regards to its application as a flea and tick repellant. Basically, it comes down to efficacy in their responses and because of their opinions I am still using the liquid poison ( fipronil ). I could take the position that the vet would prefer to recommend products which feathers the nest of the vet industry rather than garlic farmers but that would be lacking in my process of proper due diligence. My number one concern is the wellness of my dog and since she is potentially at risk for exposure to Lyme disease, I am wrestling with the dilemma of either putting poison on my dog to prevent Lyme disease or using garlic to eliminate the use of fipronil which most certainly is toxic to humans and pets but once again, supposedly all in the amount used.

One last thought regarding garlic and its hazards, I found it of interest that there are vet prescribed dog food kibbles which contain garlic oil or other forms of garlic. Since this is flies in the face of your interpretation of the poster you saw at your vet's office, it might cause you to perform your due diligence regarding the hazards of garlic. My opinion when I view the poster you attached is exactly as it was displayed and the key words are "potentially harmful". I choose to further investigate the use of garlic as a replacement for something much more harmful such as the broad based insecticide topical I currently am using.

Sorry to "bludgeon the process" but in my attempts to give my dog the best possible life, I will not just sit back and rely on what was. Science and medicine is not stagnant and neither will I be.
 

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I'm also not going to use something that *might* work with how often Jayne goes up north in the woods.

This is my current concern as well, I guess I am more inclined to use the topicals which I believe are not necessarily healthy for my dog in certain ways but it does seem to ward off ticks. If I wasn't worried about Lyme disease, I wouldn't use Frontline because I wouldn't have a problem with regular dog ticks getting on the dog but since there are deer ticks here, I have to be more proactive. I have heard enough people claim garlic and other essential oils have worked well for their dogs but I am a hard sell I guess, so far anyway.
 
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