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So ... what fruits and vegetables are good for dogs and puppies ...?

Are peaches ok ...?
 

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Peaches are okay but NO pits, they contain cyanide. Many fruits and vegetables are good for dogs. Look up a list of toxic to dogs fruits and veggies to get an idea of what you can and can't feed.
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When I add any fruits or veggies to my dog's raw diet I always puree the heck out of them. Hopefully, by breaking them down before they eat them, they get more benefit from the fruits and veggies. I'll puree blueberries, sweet potatoes, broccoli, spinach, peas etc. at times and add it to their meals.
 

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Lots of fruits and veggies are fine for dogs. But like another poster has said, pits (and apple seeds) are dangerous for dogs to eat.

Mine loves cucumbers and apples. He also likes carrots, lettuce, cantaloupe, greenbeans, sweat potatoes/potatoes, and watermelon. But he usually just gets them as once and awhile snacks/treats when we have them.

Something to keep in mind, fruits are naturally sugary so you want to give them to your dog more sparingly.
 

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I personally don't give any. They just don't get enough nutrition out of any of them to account for anything.
From: BARF diet

"Many people assume that a dog's natural diet is a meat only diet.
Unfortunately this is untrue as a meat only diet is highly unnatural and unbalanced. Meat should form only a part of the over-all healthy diet, which should include bone, fruits, vegetables, offal and other supplements as well. For example, the muscle meat eaten by wild dogs forms a small part of the diet that consists of a wide variety of other foods, including bone. "

From: Whole dog journal:
"Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious. Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.
Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.
Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs."
 

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From: BARF diet

"Many people assume that a dog's natural diet is a meat only diet.
Unfortunately this is untrue as a meat only diet is highly unnatural and unbalanced. Meat should form only a part of the over-all healthy diet, which should include bone, fruits, vegetables, offal and other supplements as well. For example, the muscle meat eaten by wild dogs forms a small part of the diet that consists of a wide variety of other foods, including bone. "

From: Whole dog journal:
"Fruits and Vegetables: While not a significant part of the evolutionary diet of the dog and wolf, fruits and vegetables provide fiber that supports digestive health, as well as antioxidants and other beneficial nutrients that contribute to health and longevity. Deeply colored vegetables and fruits are the most nutritious. Starchy Vegetables: Veggies such as potatoes, sweet potatoes, and winter squashes (including pumpkin), as well as legumes (beans), provide carbohydrate calories that can be helpful in reducing food costs and keeping weight on skinny and very active dogs. Quantities should be limited for overweight dogs. Starchy foods must be cooked in order to be digestible by dogs.
Leafy Green and Other Non-Starchy Vegetables: These are low in calories and can be fed in any quantity desired. Too much can cause gas, and raw, cruciferous veggies such as broccoli and cauliflower can suppress thyroid function (cook them if you feed large amounts). Raw vegetables must be pureed in a food processor, blender, or juicer in order to be digested properly by dogs, though whole raw veggies are not harmful and can be used as treats.
Fruits: Bananas, apples, berries, melon, and papaya are good choices. Avoid grapes and raisins, which can cause kidney failure in dogs."
Raw meat/bones/organs provide everything a dog needs nutritionally, and in a more usuable form for a dog. There is nothing in any fruits or veggies that aren't already in meat/bones/organs.

They may "snack" on berries and grass and such, but nothing they are able to live on. And I have yet to see dogs raiding someones garden along side deer and rabbits. If veggies were so important, they would be.
 

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. And I have yet to see dogs raiding someones garden along side deer and rabbits. If veggies were so important, they would be.
I don't know, I could not keep my dog out of my baby tomatoes. She picked the ripe ones right of the bush. She begs for salad and wont leave us alone when we eat watermelon unless we share.
 

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Raw meat/bones/organs provide everything a dog needs nutritionally, and in a more usuable form for a dog. There is nothing in any fruits or veggies that aren't already in meat/bones/organs.

They may "snack" on berries and grass and such, but nothing they are able to live on. And I have yet to see dogs raiding someones garden along side deer and rabbits. If veggies were so important, they would be.
Please cite your sources...? I'm particularly interested in reading more about your claim that there is 'nothing in any fruits or veggies that aren't already in meat/bones/organs.'

Meanwhile:
Dogs Are Omnivores and Should be Fed as Such | Web DVM

"Physiologically, dietary protein for the average adult canine should not exceed 25% of the total daily nutrient intake. In high performance dogs, such as those that participate in in field or agility competition, that requirement may be increased to 27%. Beyond this level of protein the dog suffers deficiencies in other key nutrients, such as soluble and insoluble fiber and anti-oxidants to name a few, while unnecessarily taxing his liver and kidneys with excessive protein metabolic waste.

Canine owners that feed raw are the biggest offenders with regard to overloading their dogs with protein, many feeding nothing but a raw meat diet. For these pet owners that are committed to raw feeding, if they are feeding their dogs nothing but meat, I would urge them to integrate fresh or cooked vegetables to represent at least 50% of total dietary intake. Green beans, carrots, broccoli, celery, and spinach are all healthy vegetable sources for dogs. It is also a good idea to integrate complex carbohydrate sources, such as brown rice and sweet potato, as well as some canine safe fruits like cantaloupe, apples, and pears."

Article written by: Dr. Roger Welton is the President of Maybeck Animal Hospital and CEO/Chief Editor of the veterinary information and blog online community, Web-DVM.
 

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A quick google search provides me with lots of examples and proofs for ... ... both carnivory and omnivory. Vets, blogs, scientific papers, etc etc, that all offer detailed proof for their side of the debate. I guess it's just another of those things that people are divided on and have OBVIOUS PROOF to back up whatever it is they believe, like most things.

Personally I suspect dogs are primarily carnivores just like their ancestors, their teeth are very obviously nothing like an omnivore's or herbivore's and their guts have more in common with a cat than humans and pig (and bears!).

But they do seem to be transitioning over the domestication process to better eat basically anything we do, which makes sense given the entire adaption to live alongside us for thousands of years now. Just because an animal CAN eat a food and may enjoy it intensely doesn't mean it's a natural part of its diet. Just look at cats and fish ..or milk. They love it, but aside from dipping a paw in your aquarium cats don't go fishing, and they certainly don't keep nursing into adulthood.
 

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Please cite your sources...? I'm particularly interested in reading more about your claim that there is 'nothing in any fruits or veggies that aren't already in meat/bones/organs.'

Meanwhile:
Dogs Are Omnivores and Should be Fed as Such | Web DVM

"Physiologically, dietary protein for the average adult canine should not exceed 25% of the total daily nutrient intake. In high performance dogs, such as those that participate in in field or agility competition, that requirement may be increased to 27%. Beyond this level of protein the dog suffers deficiencies in other key nutrients, such as soluble and insoluble fiber and anti-oxidants to name a few, while unnecessarily taxing his liver and kidneys with excessive protein metabolic waste.

Canine owners that feed raw are the biggest offenders with regard to overloading their dogs with protein, many feeding nothing but a raw meat diet. For these pet owners that are committed to raw feeding, if they are feeding their dogs nothing but meat, I would urge them to integrate fresh or cooked vegetables to represent at least 50% of total dietary intake. Green beans, carrots, broccoli, celery, and spinach are all healthy vegetable sources for dogs. It is also a good idea to integrate complex carbohydrate sources, such as brown rice and sweet potato, as well as some canine safe fruits like cantaloupe, apples, and pears."

Article written by: Dr. Roger Welton is the President of Maybeck Animal Hospital and CEO/Chief Editor of the veterinary information and blog online community, Web-DVM.
No raw feeder should ever feed only meat. Bones and organs should always be added, and are essential to being balanced.

Dogs have no diatary need for carbs. The get their energy from raw from fat. Carbs are added to kibble, to help hold the shape of the kibble, and to add in energy.

There are no "studies" to my knowledge on raw. It natural, what nature designed them to eat. The studies have been done on wolves in the wild, which is where the reasearch comes from.

I have yet to see dogs (of any kind, including wolves) robbing peoples gardens. They may eat the deer and rabbits who are though.

They have no biological need to HAVE to have grains fruits and veggies. They may like some of the tastes of them, but their lives don't depend on them, and a diet of a majority of those would leave them deficiant of nutrients.
 

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Weather or not they necessarily need it, if they like the taste of fruits and vegies and its not bad for them, I don't see the problem in giving it to them as a treat. (correct me if im wrong) plus I don't think some antioxidants or vitamins from fruits and veggies can hurt.
 

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A lot of people do give them as treats, and that's ok. But, they shouldn't make up 50% of the diet. Then they would more or less be taking on the role of fillers, that will just make them feel full. That's part of their job in kibble. (and to make the person buying the kibble feel "good" about buying a particular food that advertises lots of veggies/fruits). But sure, I say as treats if someone wants to is fine. JMO.
 

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Please cite your sources...? I'm particularly interested in reading more about your claim that there is 'nothing in any fruits or veggies that aren't already in meat/bones/organs.'

Meanwhile:
Dogs Are Omnivores and Should be Fed as Such | Web DVM

"Physiologically, dietary protein for the average adult canine should not exceed 25% of the total daily nutrient intake. In high performance dogs, such as those that participate in in field or agility competition, that requirement may be increased to 27%. Beyond this level of protein the dog suffers deficiencies in other key nutrients, such as soluble and insoluble fiber and anti-oxidants to name a few, while unnecessarily taxing his liver and kidneys with excessive protein metabolic waste.

Canine owners that feed raw are the biggest offenders with regard to overloading their dogs with protein, many feeding nothing but a raw meat diet. For these pet owners that are committed to raw feeding, if they are feeding their dogs nothing but meat, I would urge them to integrate fresh or cooked vegetables to represent at least 50% of total dietary intake. Green beans, carrots, broccoli, celery, and spinach are all healthy vegetable sources for dogs. It is also a good idea to integrate complex carbohydrate sources, such as brown rice and sweet potato, as well as some canine safe fruits like cantaloupe, apples, and pears."

Article written by: Dr. Roger Welton is the President of Maybeck Animal Hospital and CEO/Chief Editor of the veterinary information and blog online community, Web-DVM.
Look at this...NDL/FNIC Food Composition Database Home Page
 

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This doesn't tell me anything. Here's what I was able to bring up in a cursory search for ground beef on that site, but there's nothing that I can find regarding vitamin/mineral ingredients in bones and organs. If you do find that somewhere, please post! Also, in that list of ingredients for ground beef I can't figure out which ones serve as 'soluble or insoluble fiber or antioxidants', or other such things that fruits and vegetables contain.

I want to add that I've slid further over into your camp! Yes, it's true. After some additional reading in the last several days, I am leaning farther away from the idea that dogs are omnivores based on their teeth structure, length of their GI tract and other things that point to a primarily carnivorous intake. But I simply cannot agree that a pure meat/bone/organ diet is sufficient for a dog's nutrition. There ARE things in fruits and vegetables that are not provided in a bone/meat/organ diet. Definitely they're closer to carnivores than an omnivorous 50/50% balanced meat/everything else diet, but it's just not an all or nothing thing.
 

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This doesn't tell me anything. Here's what I was able to bring up in a cursory search for ground beef on that site, but there's nothing that I can find regarding vitamin/mineral ingredients in bones and organs. If you do find that somewhere, please post! Also, in that list of ingredients for ground beef I can't figure out which ones serve as 'soluble or insoluble fiber or antioxidants', or other such things that fruits and vegetables contain.

I want to add that I've slid further over into your camp! Yes, it's true. After some additional reading in the last several days, I am leaning farther away from the idea that dogs are omnivores based on their teeth structure, length of their GI tract and other things that point to a primarily carnivorous intake. But I simply cannot agree that a pure meat/bone/organ diet is sufficient for a dog's nutrition. There ARE things in fruits and vegetables that are not provided in a bone/meat/organ diet. Definitely they're closer to carnivores than an omnivorous 50/50% balanced meat/everything else diet, but it's just not an all or nothing thing.
Baden Boeroels, boerboel nutrition. This even states that the meat is already in natural, highly bio-available form as is, and the veggies must be thoroughly pulped to be able to digest.

Ant this one, more or less just an educational read. The Great Debate: Do Dogs Need Fruits and Vegetables? - Primal Pooch
 

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Baden Boeroels, boerboel nutrition. This even states that the meat is already in natural, highly bio-available form as is, and the veggies must be thoroughly pulped to be able to digest.

Ant this one, more or less just an educational read. The Great Debate: Do Dogs Need Fruits and Vegetables? - Primal Pooch
Excellent links! Both of them, particularly the Boerboel one (and gorgeous dogs too, I wish I had one!) gets fairly specific on what they feel, percentage wise, their dogs diet should be:

"Here is my recipe:
a) 55% raw bone and meat (a combination of any of the following: chicken heads and feat * beef or pork lung * heart * spleen * liver * throat.
b) 10% raw fat ( any chicken, beef and or pork fat - not the expensive fats - obtained from any abattoir or local butcher)
c) 35% raw green leafy vegetables (not unions, potatoes and rhubarb)
Grind vegetables to a pulp and then mix with rest and grind like coarse mince meat.
Feed once per day for 6 days. 7th day only a raw bone (small puppies 3 times per day and puppies from 3 to 6 months twice per day.)
De-worm puppies once per month until 1 year age"

And then further down:

"Here is my recipe for the BARF diet:
60 % turkey heads or chicken heads and feet (the bone and meat ratio is perfect)
10 % organ meat of chicken, pork, beef or turkey (like heart, spleen, liver, lung, kidney)
10 % fat of chicken, beef or turkey
15 % vegetables like little pumpkin and carrots, beans and lots of green vegetable leafs, also little beetroot. (no potato, union and rhubarb)
5% fruit - it can be little over ripe
First grind the vegetable and fruit to a pulp. Then grind vegetable fruit pulp and the rest together with a coarse grinder. For the turkey heads and chicken heads and feet you need a rather strong grinder. You can freeze in portions. Thaw to room temperature before use. Never cook or microwave the food. After thaw throw the juice that forms over the food.
You can add Alfalfa powder and Kelp powder.
Try and find an abattoir near you or a farmer. "

This is more along the lines of what I was talking about when I mentioned that it's just not an all or nothing thing. And it's not, according to the recommended diet copied above. I did find and read through the 'Great Debate' link in the last couple of days, but I really like the specificity of the Boerboel one you have here. Very helpful!
 
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