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I am looking for a friendly dog ​​for small children. What breed you recommend in choosing the right dog.
 

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Golden retrievers and labs are what my mind goes to first, but they need a lot of exercise as well and fit best with more active families. Well bred American bullies are swwet too. I don't know as much about them but I don't think they need as much physical activity.
Just make sure, whatever breed you go with, to go with a responsible breeder to ensure the dog will be healthy and will have a good stable temperament.
 

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American bullies are very active dogs.....need lots of exercise. Built for working. Not the easiest dogs to handle. Have had several friends who own them. Aggression level tends to be on the high end. Good dogs, protective, can take on almost anything they run into......but could easily be too much dog for alot of people.
If an easy going, child friendly dog is what the OP is looking for why not check the rescues and shelters and see whats out there?
SirRiley said goldens, good dogs. Could also check out king charles spaniels, corgis, I've seen some white labs and white retrievers recently who had super good temperaments....
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Collies, Rough or Smooth; not Border. Hands down, the best children dogs in my opinion. They tolerate so much and will do anything the kid asks. They're not crazy high energy either. If you're going to get a dog with small children though, you might want to get an older dog instead of a puppy, because puppies are like having another baby. You could check breed specific rescues, or contact breeders for a retired dog, if you're looking for an older dog. Collies, specifically, will be really challenging to find in a regular shelter because they aren't as common and the Collie community is really good at pulling them out as quickly as possible to get them cleaned up and into good homes.

Checking shelters/rescues for a solid, calm, adult mix dog could work too but, with little children I would be extra cautious with your search.
 

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From my experience with Rough Collies, I think they would make a wonderful addition to a family with young children. I suppose Smooth Collies would be all the same without all the shed. I've never owned one but been around numerous Rough Collies and their families for years. Not that it is a negative but they do exercise their vocal chords with appropriate alert barking as do many breeds.

Collies seem to be as friendly as can be most generally and I've entertained the idea of getting a Smooth.
 

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You'll want to consider other factors such as size, energy level, grooming needs, etc. to narrow down suitable breeds but...
For families with young kids, I tend to suggest beagles, bichons, pugs, and other sturdy but smaller breeds that tend to be social/outgoing.

Just less trouble with small kids being knocked over and play getting too rough that is often common with pups of larger "family friendly breeds".
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This is a hard question to answer, as there are a lot of breeds that do great in the aspect of children, but depending on the rest of the family's lifestyle, may be unsuitable.

Any herding breed may tend to be nippy with children. Terriers tend to be high strung and - in my opinion - a bit too nervy with children. Labs are generally good family dogs, but it depends often time on their individual lines, as I know there are a lot of bite reports and whatnot.

My mind goes to suggesting Golden Retriever, although I'm a bit biased as that's my top breed for nearly everything.

It's also worth mentioning that whatever dog you get, be aware to train your child, too! Show them how to respect your dog's space, and know what warning signs to look out for in a dog that's irritated, anxious, or otherwise fearful.
 

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Absolutely agree that it's the children (and all adults in the household, too) who need to be trained about how to behave with a dog as much as the dog needs to be trained. Even the most mellow dog in the world will have his/her breaking point and shouldn't be pushed to it by a child who hasn't learned, or is too young to understand, that there are some things they just shouldn't do to a dog.

Also, in terms of breeds, you also have to take into consideration the individual dog. There are always going to be exceptions to the rule, so make sure the particular dog you choose has the temperament you want and will suit your household in other ways. For instance, if you intend to travel a lot with your dog, it's important the dog is fine in the car. Or if you aren't a particularly active family, you don't want a high energy dog. Or if you don't want to spend a lot of time and/or money on grooming, you don't want a dog who will require that. There are just a lot of factors you need to consider.

You might look to see if there's a dog show or a "meet the breeds" events in your area, so you could see a number of different breeds at once and might be able to talk to people who own the breeds (though that's more likely at a "meet the breeds" event than at a dog show, where the owners/handlers might be too focused on showing/competing to be able, or willing, to talk to you, which is completely understandable). Even if you're thinking you might rescue a mixed breed from a shelter, seeing the different breeds will give you an idea of what they're like, how big they'll get, etc., so that if you see a mix of particular breeds available, you might have a somewhat better idea of what that dog's genetic heritage may have given him/her. Just FYI, my last two shelter mutts have worked as therapy dogs and my current dog has also done a little competing in rally and obedience and has trick dog titles as well. So, it's possible to find a friendly, reasonably biddable mixed breed in a shelter, too, though if you're more interested in a purebred, that's what you should go for. Everybody has to select the dog that's best suited to their personal needs for the relationship to be a successful one.
 

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Carly, our beagle mix, is almost a year now. We got her from the shelter at 16 weeks. I have three kids now ages 4, 8, and 12, and she is awesome with them. Their friends, too, who are always around. Before we got her, my husband did a lot of reading about children and dogs and concluded a beagle of some sort would be ideal. So far he has been right. I agree with Tilden' s comment above about training the kids, too. We still have to watch our youngest as he tends to get overly snuggly with Carly...laying on her and being touchy feely when she clearly wants to be left alone. So it's an ongoing process!
 

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Consider a well bred Boxer. They can be higher energy, but ime they are easy to train, like kids, good with regular exercise- good off switch, medium size so not too large, easy grooming. There are health concerns so I would go with the best breeder possible.

Other than that, you could look in shelter or rescue to find an older dog pure bred or mix breed that meets your requirements. I'd look at multiple dogs and visit with the same dog(s) several times. If in a rescue the foster home can give you a good idea.

American bullies are very active dogs.....need lots of exercise. Built for working. Not the easiest dogs to handle. Have had several friends who own them. Aggression level tends to be on the high end. Good dogs, protective, can take on almost anything they run into......but could easily be too much dog for alot of people.
I'd have to disagree about Am Bully.
They were never meant for work. They are in the companion category. I understand there is variance but with many build is not conducive to work, nor the skull / muzzle. The activity level varies of course, but most are fine with regular exercise, nothing to strenuous and you do have to be careful in certain weather due to heat intolerance with some. I'd also not put them as highly aggressive, the dog aggression has been greatly reduced (in many at least), some may have a level of prey drive, some may not, many still retain human social behaviors others have a more territorial nature (I'm sure this has to do with what breeds were mixed into specific lines), then you've those that are simply unstable- that's not acceptable or the norm but like with Kimbo dogs, anyone looking should research!

I'm not an Am Bully expert by any means either and I understand there different categories so there are those capable of working / sporting, it just isn't typically what most are breeding for nor to be expected (unless you go for a line like that). Overall the purpose of AmBully was reduced animal aggression, in an exaggerated package (big head, wide chest, short legs or large size, ect).
Some XL Am Bully have guardian type breeds in background so would be similar to bandog in looks, aggression level and working capability - some of those would also be reg as something else too.
Standard is a heavy set dog, bred for looks, some have drive and all, but not like in comparison to an actual hardcore working breed. They are still overall bred for looks and companionship.
Classic looks more like a AmStaff / heavier AmStaff. They are physically capable for working if they have the drive for it. If you can provide a walk and play they should do well though. If you can handle the needs of a Lab (often energetic and slow to mature) one can probably handle an Am Bully.
Pocket is in no way a working bred dog, often smaller bulldog breeds in the background means more laid back temperament, lower energy and body not physically capable of handling a lot.

Other not recognized types like micro would be even more extreme then pocket and exotic forget about it - seem intentionally bred for deformities, some can't even live a normal life in my opinion or meet the equivalent capabilities of an average companion. If a dog can hardly move or breath what is it capable of?

A well bred bully is hard to find, very few breeders actually care about anything other than money, rare colors and freak looks. If one is interested in them look for one of the few breeders that actually health tests, breeds normal structure, a dog being Champ doesn't equate to good structure you have to look at the "class" they are in and judge for yourself, but if they compete in conformation, dog sports, health tests and temperament tests / are known for producing stable temperament then you've probably found a rare good breeder to get a pet dog from.

I'm not an Am Bully hater, just don't see most as capable of handling much of anything, even if mentally capable there comes a question of physical limitations some can't even breed or give birth naturally
American-Bully-Pocket-size-Codename-Blood_1523199222214.jpg
 

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Yeah.... I have to disagree with Boxers being easy to train. My dog is half-boxer and he is as stubborn as you like. I also know other boxer owners and they say the same thing. They are great dogs but you need patience and knowledge to train them.
What's the other half?

Let me restate.
In my experience Boxers are easy to train. As they (ime of ownership of Boxers) learn relatively quickly. Positive reinforcement (praise or treats) worked well for me. My dogs were fairly biddable, rather than stubborn. Seem to thrive on learning new things, so beyond obedience was easy to train. Nose work, bringing me things, opening doors, ect. I like dogs that learn fast, but are also obedient.

However, apparently your mileage may vary. Best bet is to talk to the breeder about their dogs and specific lines they are working with to know the expectations of easy to train vs moe challenging.
 

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My current dog is twenty five percent boxer, twenty five percent gsd shepherd mix, twenty five percent Chow Chow, twelve and a half percent each lab and American Staffordshire terrier. He's huge! Much taller and heavier than all the breeds Except gsd, and very defiant and stubborn. Learns tricks very quickly with treats. Only does them when he feels like it or for food or attention.

My last dog was an Akita pitbull mix. He was super high energy and NEEDED at least 2-4 hours of constant running and exercise daily or he was a hyper basket case. Even at age eleven he needed to run and play daily until he got the awful degenerative myelopathy.
He didn't have any problems with heat or cold intolerance until he was maybe ten.
Maybe the Akita? Or he was just my perfect superdog. ??❤????
 

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What's the other half?

Let me restate.
In my experience Boxers are easy to train. As they (ime of ownership of Boxers) learn relatively quickly. Positive reinforcement (praise or treats) worked well for me. My dogs were fairly biddable, rather than stubborn. Seem to thrive on learning new things, so beyond obedience was easy to train. Nose work, bringing me things, opening doors, ect. I like dogs that learn fast, but are also obedient.

However, apparently your mileage may vary. Best bet is to talk to the breeder about their dogs and specific lines they are working with to know the expectations of easy to train vs moe challenging.

He's half Staffy. As Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Not the American variety. George has the stubbornness typical of Boxers and the bullishness typical of Staffies.

Boxers have a reputation for being stubborn because most of them are. The OP may be as lucky as you but there is no guarantee of it.
 

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My last dog was an Akita pitbull mix. He was super high energy and NEEDED at least 2-4 hours of constant running and exercise daily or he was a hyper basket case. Even at age eleven he needed to run and play daily until he got the awful degenerative myelopathy.
He didn't have any problems with heat or cold intolerance until he was maybe ten.
Maybe the Akita? Or he was just my perfect superdog. ??❤????
I wouldn't think solely the Akita, combo of the two. Pits range from moderate to high energy and can be very drivey. So require exercise all seasons, while they don't have the coat to endure the cold (maybe Akita would be better there) brief periods in moderate winter weather outdoors is okay, some just hate the snow and cold, big babies lol. Far as the heat, never had any problems there! I live in a humid climate during summer so 90-100 degrees, 80-100% humidity without issue. I don't overdo it of course and often wet dogs down when working and try to start early, but even by 10am it might be 80% almost 90 we do flirt pole, drag weight, walking, wall climb and then more often do springpole in evening and more walking.

Consider hot and humid south with these dogs hog hunting.

What's the other half?

Let me restate.
In my experience Boxers are easy to train. As they (ime of ownership of Boxers) learn relatively quickly. Positive reinforcement (praise or treats) worked well for me. My dogs were fairly biddable, rather than stubborn. Seem to thrive on learning new things, so beyond obedience was easy to train. Nose work, bringing me things, opening doors, ect. I like dogs that learn fast, but are also obedient.

However, apparently your mileage may vary. Best bet is to talk to the breeder about their dogs and specific lines they are working with to know the expectations of easy to train vs moe challenging.

He's half Staffy. As Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Not the American variety. George has the stubbornness typical of Boxers and the bullishness typical of Staffies.

Boxers have a reputation for being stubborn because most of them are. The OP may be as lucky as you but there is no guarantee of it.
Are you in the UK? Can you describe "bullishness"?
Also do you have any pics ?

No, certainly not a guarantee, but doesn't have to be luck either if they research the specific dogs it can increase their chances.
I found Cane Corso to be more stubborn breed, as if its boring to learn even though she isn't dumb at all. Like if she feels like doing it then its fine, but otherwise lol.
I don't want to steer OP in the wrong direction or anything either. I've seen mixed reviews on how trainable they are and stubborn ones might be more common too, but I know other have had similar experience to me. I'm not really sure the OP overall expectations on training either. It might be best, even if they go with another breed to use a pro trainer.
 

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Yep, I'm in the UK.

By 'bullishness' I mean the typical Staffy way of seeing the world. The whole world is theirs to play in and nothing gets in their way. Through it rather than round it or over it.

Don't get me wrong, I love Staffies. My last one was my heart dog. But they are rarely a nervous dog, in fact you could say they are 'bomb-proof'.

This pic is when I fell in love with him. He was lying next to me and I looked down and said 'Good boy Ty.' And he smiled at me.
 

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Guys, looks like we've veered of topic here...
Please make sure any further posts are related to or answering the op's question. Thanks.
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My dog is a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel and is the sweetest natured, most loving and gentle dog ever. Saying that, she could be very easily intimidated by young children as she would not retaliate. They can make a dog's life a misery if not properly 'trained' and supervised (not to eat/shout near a dog, pull it around or disturb it while eating/sleeping etc.) Breeds like Border Collies are not suitable for young children unless the owners are VERY experienced and knowledgeable. Children should never be left alone with a dog or puppy or be allowed to walk it unsupervised. I would be careful with breeds like bull terriers. It is said they are not aggressive unless poorly trained but it's interesting that most child attacks involve them. A lot depends on experienced and sensible parents. Check out this book - Complete Puppy & Dog Care by Bruce Fogle. It reviews different breeds and is a mine of information generally.
 
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